Method and System for Producing a Document

October 6, 2015


Israel Patent Application number IL 215110 titled “Method and System for Producing a Document” relates to Rami Dotan and Tal Petel relates to a method of producing a “yearbook”.

The claimed invention was originally rejected as relating to an administrative methodology rather than to a technical method. Furthermore, the claimed invention was rejected as known, in light of WO 2006063327 “Method of creating a yearbook”.

In response to the first office action, the first inventor scheduled a meeting with the Examiner who explained the rejection in more detail.

The Applicant responded to the Examiner’s summary of that meeting, that there is a technical problem in the market in that the graphic designer does not know the students and so it is difficult to correctly link photographs with text.

On 7 August 2013, The Examiner issued a further Office Action detailing why the claimed invention did not relate to patentable subject matter under Section 3 of the Law and added some additional objections.

On 17 November 2013 The Applicant responded with a narrower claim set that allegedly overcame the objections.
In a final rejection dated 26 June 2014, the Examiner again refused the application and the Applicant requested a further Interview.

On 5 November 2014, the Applicant, his “representative for the purposes of the Interview” (apparently Patent Attorney Chaim Brandstatter) and the Examiner met, and versions 4 and 4 1/2 of the claims were discussed. Based on the similarity of the cited art WO 2006063327 “Method of creating a yearbook” and the claimed invention, the Examiner was persuaded to withdraw his section 3 (patentable subject matter) rejection and to focus on the issue of novelty and inventive step (non obviousness).

Furthermore, the parties accepted that the differences between the cited art and the claimed invention were features known to persons of the art.

Following the meeting of 6 November 2015, the Applicant submitted a further version (version 5).

Despite the Examiner considering the claimed invention to be obvious in light of WO 2006063327 together with two elements well known in the art, the Examiner did a further search and discovered USSN 2002/0055955 “Method of Annotating an Image” that allegedly taught these two features. Consequently, the Examiner refused the application under section 5.

The Applicant appealed this decision:

The Applicant felt that the 5th version of claims, submitted after 5 November 2014 was not addressed. The Examiner countered that the elements in version 5 were not supported. The Applicant considered that this went against the conclusion of the meeting, Examiner guidelines and Section 23 of the Law.

According to the guidelines, after issuance of a final rejection, the Applicant can either correct the outstanding issues or request an interview. In this instance, the Applicant attempted to do both, and following the interview, submitted a further claim-set. Thus the Examiner was within his rights to reject the Application following the interview, despite the further amendment submitted.

Neither the Law nor the Regulations provide a maximum number of Office Actions, but the Deputy Commissioner, Ms Jacqueline Bracha considers it unacceptable to understand that the examination allows infinite iterations and the Examiner cannot issue a final rejection.

That said, the case was considered borderline and the Deputy Commissioner was prepared to rule on the merits of the claimed invention, i.e. to look at the final version of the claims.

The claimed invention is:

1. A method for producing a document (30, 32, 36) comprising photographs (38) of persons (16A, 16B, 16C) and texts (42) associated with said photographs (38), said method comprising the steps of:
Manually capturing a single photograph or a single group (A, B, C) of photographs for each of said persons (16A, 16B, 16C), by a photographer (24), and loading the photographs while recording the singularity to a first table (58) of a database (52) being a part of a site (22) on the internet (14);
Manually providing by an organization in which said persons (16A, 16B, 16C) are members, a second table (26) to said database (52), said second table (26) comprising one text (42) for each of said persons (16A, 16B, 16C);
Manually matching, by persons familiar with said persons (16A, 16B, 16C) each of said texts (42) of said second table (26) with one of said photographs of said first table (58);
Upon said manual matching, programmably hiding that text (42) and the photograph matched thereto and any photograph grouped thereto, thereby avoiding failures;
Manually printing, by a graphic artist (20) accessing said database (52), each of said matched photographs (38) adjacent to the text (42) matched thereto,
thereby tracing a failure once a text of said second table (26) cannot be matched with a photograph.

Claims 2-10 are dependent method claims and claim 11 is for a corresponding system.

The claimed invention is similar to the first citation, with two features taught in the second citation.
Since the Applicant does not provide an alternative method of implementation to that given in the prior art, the claimed invention is either not enabled or lacks inventiveness.

Section 12 requires enabling disclosure. Where a method of achieving the claimed invention is not provided, one can conclude that either it is not possible or that it uses known elements and is thus obvious. Either way, in this instance, the Application does not provide enabling disclosure and is thus not allowed.

In conclusion, the Application was rejected.


In Australia, the patent corresponding to WO 2006063327 did issue back in 2005. I am not sure though, that it would still be considered directed to patentable subject matter as such computer facilitated inventions are rather difficult to obtain.
From the number of dubious publications with titles such as Directory of World’s Leading Patent Experts that I am invited to appear in subject to paying exorbitant fees, it does seem that there are patent attorneys who missed out on their high school yearbooks and are willing to pay to see their mug-shot and biography in a directory that no one reads.

The State of the Union Address

September 16, 2015

state of the union

On Thursday 1o September, the Union of European Practitioners in Intellectual Property held their Union Dinner at the Royal Overseas League. The State Taste of the Union Address was given by IP Hall of Fame Inductee, Professor Jeremy Phillips, and the cost for the dinner and talk was 69 pounds a head, with discounts to 44 quid for members. That’s a 420 NIS cover charge discounted to 250 NIS. I reckon that this was extraordinary value for money for dinner and a chance to hear Professor Jeremy Phillips, who is the founder of Managing Intellectual Property (MIP), the IPKAT and much more besides.

The dinner was a last chance to hear Professor Phillips who is planning on full retirement from all IP interests, including lecturing, his editorship of Marques and of the Oxford Journal of Intellectual Property Law & Practice.

Jeremy’s talk was titled “IP in 2015 – Where we are and where I thought we’d be”.

Cinema CityAt great expense, I have managed to persuade Professor Phillips to give a repeat performance in Israel on 7th October 2015 at Sin City, Jerusalem.

The event, including buffet style refreshments, wines and beer, is fully subsidized to IP practitioners of all kinds, legal and cowboy, examiners, judges, clients, patent attorneys, lawyers, paralegals and the like. Places are limited however, and are filling up fast. If you’d like to attend, please register here.

When: 7 October 2015; 5 PM to 7 PM  Add to Calendar

Where:   Cinema City, Itzhak Rabin 10, (Opposite the Supreme Court),Jerusalem

To register,
Contact us here

Patents on Life: The Roles of Ethics, Commerce, and Religion

September 10, 2015


The first afternoon session was entitled “Patents on Life: The Roles of Ethics, Commerce, and Religion” and was Chaired by Professor Tom Berg of the University of St Thomas, Minnesota.

syngenta  Dr Michael Kock, Global Head of IP, Syngenta spoke on “Patents for life: Towards an ethical use of patents on plant innovations”. Unfortunately, Dr Kock has a German accent that is reminiscent of 1960s style war movies, but his presentation as excellent. It purported to look for a balance between corporate greed and the public good and to critically examine genetic engineering, however, essentially was a very informative and persuasive corporate presentation on why none of our crops can be considered natural, noting that carrots were white, until they were crossed with the Persian purple carrot in nineteenth century Holland as a tribute to the Royal House of Orange, to create the orange root we are familiar with. He argued convincingly, that all food was genetically modified.

Dr Kock focused on why introducing a rot resistant gene from Chinese cabbage into cauliflower, white cabbage, brussel sprouts, etc. by genetic engineering was more efficient than selective breeding. However he didn’t really discuss the more controversial topic of transplanting a gene from one genus to another, with the implicit Spiderman worries.  True, the presentation was a carefully crafted presentation from industry. Nevertheless, it does put things into some sort of perspective. He suggested a radical arbitration mechanism based on game theory and the prisoner’s dilemma to determine the correct licensing royalty in IP disputes.

painting the roses red

Professor Margo A. Bagley, of theUniversity of Virginia School of Law ‘Thou Shalt Not Steal’: Morality and Misappropriation in Life Sciences Patenting” and Professor Paul Heald, Professor of Law, University of Illinois spoke about “One Nation Under Pfizer (or maybe Monsanto)”.

I wondered what Father Gregor Mendel  would have thought of it all.

During yet another coffee break, to clarify the point that popular opinion on genetic engineering and science is based on ignorance, someone told me that when presented with a ripe tomato and told that it contained 350,000 genes, 80% of respondents were horrified and wouldn’t eat it.

J-Date swipes at J-Swipe

August 11, 2015

There are well-defined groups of Jewish singles looking for partners. In traditional society, the match-maker paired up potential partners, and made his/her living from so-doing. In the wider society, friends and acquaintances suggested that people who seemed compatible should meet. Depending on the perceptiveness of the match-maker, the date could be very successful or very tedious for both parties.
In 1997 J-Date offered a computerized match-making service to Jews. Apparently their questionnaires enable people to provide more details of who they are and what they are looking for. J-Date quickly grew to become a leading service provider.
If 1997 was the beginning of the Internet revolution, nearly 20 years later things have changed. J-Swipe is an application that lets those interested in dating discover the proximity of potentially suitable partners, to find out a little more about them, and to contact those of interest. It is apparently a circumcised ritually immersed version of Tinder, a similar application that is less tribal. Apparently J-Swipe is the #1 Jewish dating app with users in over 70 countries. They also claim 375,000+ JSwipe users from across the world (which compares nicely with the number of times this blog has been accessed, but my statistic includes repeat views, and the blog has been going for longer).
Both J-Date and J-Swipe target the same audience, i.e. single Jews, and offer similar services. So J-Date sued J-Swipe and also connected hosting sites and the like, threatening to sue them.
J-Date claims patent infringement and trademark infringement.
Their patent is US 5,950,200 to Sudai and Blumberg titled ” Method and apparatus for detection of reciprocal interests or feelings and subsequent notification”
The independent method claim is

1. A method that notifies people that they feel reciprocal interest for each other, comprising the steps, performed by a processor of a data processing system having a memory, of:
receiving input from a first user indicating a user ID of a specific person in whom the first user has an interest, the first user already being aware of the existence of the person whose ID they entered;
receiving input from a second user indicating a user ID of a specific person in whom the second user has an interest, the second user already being aware of the existence of the person whose ID they entered;
determining whether the user ID of the person in whom the first user has an interest matches a user ID of the second user;
determining whether the user ID of the person in whom the second user has an interest matches a user ID of the first user; and
if and only if a match occurs in both of the determining steps, notifying the first user and the second user that a match has occurred.

There is an independent apparatus claim as well:

28. An apparatus that notifies people that they feel reciprocal interest for each other, comprising:
a first input portion, configured to receive input from a first user indicating a user ID of a specific person in whom the first user has an interest, the first user already being aware of the existence of the person whose ID they entered;
a second input portion, configured to receive input from a second user indicating a user ID of a specific person in whom the second user has an interest, the second user already being aware of the existence of the person whose ID they entered;
a first determining portion, coupled to the first and second input portions, configured to determine whether the user ID of the person in whom the first user has an interest matches a user ID of the second user;
a first determining portion, coupled to the first and second input portions, configured to determine whether the user ID of the person in whom the second user has an interest matches a user ID of the first user; and
a notifying portion, coupled to the first and second determining portions, configured to notify the first user and the second user if and only if the first and second determining portions have detected a match.

There is also a means claim and a software claim.

Back in 1999 such patents issued. Nowadays they don’t.

The trouble is, as VOX put it, JDate claims to own the concept of connecting 2 people based on mutual attraction.

Now, J-Date denies that it against market competition:
“This is not about us discouraging market competition,” Michael Egan, CEO of the company behind JDate, wrote to the New York Observer’s Brady Dale. “Our case against JSwipe is about their theft of our technology.” I am not convinced.
Having an issued patent, there is a rebuttable assumption of validity and they cannot be accused of bad faith in attempting to assert their patent against infringers. However, I doubt that the patent would be upheld in court.

When considering validity, US courts are governed by current case law in their interpretation of concepts such as patentable subject matter, novelty and obviousness. Many patents issued at the turn of the millenium will not stand up in court.

In addition to patents, J-Date also claims trademark infringement. J-Date argues that J-Swipe infringes their mark. Back when I was a student in England, college Jewish Societies were known as J-Socs and presumably still are. The left leaning America-Israel pressure group J-Street uses a J for the same reason. The J indicates Jewish. It seems unlikely that the courts would recognize an individual company having rights in the letter J for dating services.
I doubt that the patent would stand up in court as most of the computerized service patents are voidable in light of recent decisions, and the patent in question doesn’t seem very exciting. I also doubt that the argument of trademark infringement will stand up. The thing is that J-Date have deep pockets and see a threat to their market dominance. They are suing because they can.

Yentl is using behavior more appropriate to a troll. Still all is fair in the business of love.

Matchmaker – Fiddler on the Roof (1971)

Deleting Documents in Patent Cancellation Proceeding

August 4, 2015

fighting robots

Aquatron and Maytronics are competing Israeli companies that each make pool cleaning robots.

Maytronics was awarded Israel Patent IL 206154 titled “Pool Cleaning Robot”. Aquatron filed to have the patent cancelled.

In the cancellation proceedings various issues came up such as whether Aquatron had received permission from Maytronics to use the patent. However, in a procedural agreement between the parties, it was decided that the summation statements would not to relate to this issue.

In their summation, Maytronics, did, however relate to the alleged license to use the patent, and so Aquatron filed to have the relevant passages deleted from the file. In their defense, Maytronics’ argued that Aquatron had submitted emails that related to the agreement as part of their evidence, and this had voided the procedural agreement.

Ms Jacqueline Bracha used Contract Law (section 25a) to rule that what was agreed between the sides is binding. Had they intended to state that evidence should be suppressed they could have done so. The disputed sections on the patentee’s summation were ordered deleted from the record, but the emails submitted by Aquatron were allowed.

Israel Supreme Court Issues Long Awaited Decision regarding Service Inventions

July 23, 2015

employment agreement

Isscar is a leading Israel company that manufactures hard metal cutting tools. As an employee at Isscar, Gidon Barzani was involved in the development of hard metal cutting tools at Isscar during the years 1992 to 1995, and again between 1997 and 2001 and was involved in a certain service invention, his actual contribution being a matter of contention. The employee signed various documents that gave up on monetary claims.

In Israel, an employee invention is owned by the employer. However, under Section  134 of the Law, the employee is entitled to compensation, the amount of which is determined by a special committee under Section 109.

The Committee, at the head of which sits the retired Supreme Court Justice, Itzak Englard, the Commissioner of Patents and an university professor, rejected Barzani’s claims as he had had waived his rights to consideration for the inventions when he signed on the general waiver.

Barzani appealed to the Supreme Court as a High Court of Justice (BAGATZ) see here which resulted in the committee freezing its actions.

One of the more interesting legal questions is whether a general waiver as part of the employment contract, where no invention is yet conceived can be considered as legally binding. (Talmudist’s may note a similarity to discussion of unlaid eggs).

The Supreme Court rejected the appeal arguing that it had limited power to interfere since under Section 111, the Bagatz ruling was final. The Supreme Court ruled that Section 134 describes a non-cogent right that is not a socialist employee right that requires special defense. On the face of things and with deference to the language of the clause, the decision appears to be correct, and certainly is sufficiently reasonable that there is no justification for court interference.

Nevertheless, the court noted that in a dynamic and changing world there is room for additional legislation or for companies to come up with voluntary compensation schemes. However, there is no reason for the court to interfere.

Judge Reuven, Deputy President of the Supreme Court quoted Section 109 of the Law as follows:

Where there is no agreement providing compensation to the employee for his service invention, regarding the amount of compensation and the conditions, these will be determined by the Committee for Compensation and Royalties.

Section 111 fixes the finality of the committee’s decision, but there is no doubt that in extreme circumstances, the Supreme Court sitting as a High Court of Justice can interfere. Since, however, the committee includes a retired senior court justice, the commissioner and an academic, interference in its conclusions are likely to be minimal, and this instance does not justify the court’s involvement.

The main argument, following the Actelis ruling of 2010 is concerned with the question of whether Section 134 should be considered cogent or dispositive. The committee came to the conclusion that it is not a cogent right and is not an example of employer-employee labour law where (due to the inherent differences in power between the sides) workers’ rights require special protection. The ruling seems to be correct, but anyway, since the Law states that the committee’s rulings are final, there is no room for the court to interfere.

Nevertheless, the court has criticized the current situation and noted that common sense and natural justice indicate that there is room for a more equitable arrangement,  whether the result of voluntary agreement or of legislation, and such arrangements exist in the private sector.

4353/14 Appeal to Supreme Court, Barzani vs. Isscar, Ruling by Rubinstein Fogelman and Mazuz 8/7/15


There was a lot of interest in this case, and we believe that employers will be giving deep sighs of relief. Employees will probably feel that the system favours the company against the individual. I am aware that some academics have strong feelings, see for example, Dr Shlomit Ravid’s position here and here.

Since the court has criticized the committee’s ruling and is not prepared to get involved, it is not inconceivable that a future committee could reach the opposite conclusion. Indeed, one of the judges of this ruling might, on retirement, sit in such a committee. There may, therefore, be room for clear legislation on the issue.

Personally, I think the Supreme Court decision is correct. I encourage corporate clients to institute compensation programs or at least weekend breaks and the like to encourage employees to come forwards with ideas, but think that changing the law in Israel may result in multi-nationals taking their R&D centers elsewhere, and that is not good for the economy or the workers.

A lack of uniformity in unity of invention

July 20, 2015
As Israel’s leading IP blogger, I regularly get emails and phone calls from students, inventors, academics and professionals, both from Israel and abroad, about various aspects of patent and trademark practice.
Most recently, I received an interesting question on what constitutes unity of invention. The question is rather better than the answer.
All regimes require unity of invention. One is entitled to protect one invention in a single patent. There are separate issues regarding double patenting, i.e. protecting the same invention with more than one patent, but, how is a single invention determined?
The practice relates to claims and differs in different jurisdictions.
In the US, unity seems to depend on the main class that the Examiner classifies the invention as and has to search when evaluating novelty and non-obviousness. One can file up to three independent claims (regardless of type) for the same basic price. However, there is no limit on the number of independent claims in the same class, since the searching requires trawling the same material.
US Examiners love to issue restriction orders due to multiple inventions, and sometimes do this based on the figures. They may require a restriction to a product or process, but may also require an election of a preferred species where different figures show different embodiments. However, once a structure is allowed, corresponding and withdrawn method claims can be allowed and rejoined so long as the method requires using the allowed apparatus.
In Europe, the theory relates to the inventive concept to be searched. In practice one is entitled to one independent method claim and one independent apparatus claim. Anything else and the claims will be reject as ambiguous.
It will be appreciated therefore, that the same claims may be considered as having unity in US but not in Europe and vice-versus.  Indeed, with two independent method claims and two independent structure claims each with minor differences, I’d expect the USPTO examiner to want inventor to elect either method claims or structure claims, and EPO examiner to want one of each.
In Israel (and there is no logic to this – it was a circular from Previous Commissioner, Meir Noam), one is entitled for up to two claims of each type. this can be method, product, system, gene sequence (now no longer patentable anywhere else).
Examiners will require restrictions on unity considerations, but there is no clear definition of unity. If a foreign patent office allows a set of claims one can request allowance under Section 17c and the issue of unity is not a grounds for objection by examiner or in opposition. What this means is that something acceptable in the US or in Europe (or in UK, Austria, Australia and other jurisdictions recognized in Appendix B for purposes of Section 17c) is acceptable in Israel. Since US and Europe have different standards, it will be clear that there is no clear standard in Israel.
See for more information.



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