Madonna’s Apples

April 28, 2015

Madonna's apples

CNN broke a story over the weekend about a woman who has  had to copyright her breasts in response to revenge porn.

It seems that she enjoyed a long distance relationship and sent her significant other ‘selfies’ that would perhaps be best described as compromising. When the relationship petered out, she was aghast to discover that her significant other had uploaded the pictures to the Internet and they had gone viral.

Apparently, the constitutional right of ‘Freedom of Speech’ under the US Constitution may over-ride rights to privacy. The legal advice she got was to copyright the images.

Now, as the photographer of the selfies, she has rights in the image. If her boyfriend had photographed her, she would not have these rights. Copyright is automatic under International treaty, but to enforce in the US, registration is required. She dutifully, uploaded a hundred or so images to the Library of Congress, where apparently, the images are catalogued but restricted, so only one filing clerk there has seen the images.

Here is the problem. Let’s assume that Ms ‘Hozer B’Tzniyut’ discovers a compromising image on a website. She get’s a lawyer to send a Cease & Desist letter. The site owner may request proof, and will then be sent the full book of pictures. Now, whereas the individual image may come down, the others may be posted elsewhere. Very difficult to work out who has uploaded and to where. Oh, and there are video clips as well.

Madonna, who has an interest in Kabbala, has published a retelling of a story by the Hassidic Master, the Baal Shem Tov, comparing retracting libel and slander with ripping open a pillow on a hill top on  a blustery day, and then trying to collect all the feathers. If Esther Madonna ever decides to try to remove compromising pictures of herself from the Internet, she will discover that the problems are similar.

There is probably a moral in this story somewhere….

Talking of modesty, I was somewhat appalled to hear the opening item on the Mid Day News on Israel National Remembrance Day that a headmaster of a Convent School  Ulpana had invited ex-students now serving in the army to attend the school’s remembrance ceremony, and since they turned up in uniform, wearing trousers, that he asked them not to attend. This story was worrying for a number of reasons. The fact that it got on the news means that the headmaster was set up, and should have known better. The girl soldiers could, however, have worn a skirt uniform. That said, the impressionable school girls are presumably aware both of the school’s policy and of the fact that after leaving school, some girls young women may, nevertheless, wear slacks.

Travelling home for the Independence Day Celebrations, just after hearing this storm in a tea-cup, I picked up a hitch-hiker by Eli. the hitch-hiker teaches in the religious, pre-army program in Eli. He felt that the headmaster was right and and that there was an issue of modesty. I countered that it was an issue of fashion. He noted that one can see the shape a woman’s lower anatomy if she is wearing slacks. I was tempted to point out that he was wearing trousers and one could see the shape of his lower anatomy as well.  He could, of course, wear the dishdash (also referred to as dish-dasha or even gandoora, gandurah or even tawb or taub), the long white robe favoured by our Moslem cousins in the villages around Eli, or Begged Ivri, the style of dress of 2000 years ago, worn by actors playing Jews in films about Masada and the Crucifixion, like Ben Hur, Life of Brian, etc. In other words, clothing is far more about fashion than modesty.

Proverbs 30: 18-19:  “There are three things which are too wonderful for me, Four which I do not understand: The way of an eagle in the sky, The way of a serpent on a rock, The way of a ship in the middle of the sea, And the way of a man with a maid“.

What these verses mean, is that there are things that don’t leave a trace.

In the picture of Madonna above, with her sheitel like haircut and long sleeves, she looks more like a balabusta than like a Sem girl Like a Virgin.

Whilst watching the Ceremony distributing the Israel Prize to notable worthies the following day, I noted that the one female honoree, and also the President of the Supreme Court, Miriam Naor, in her official capacity, representing the Israel Legal System, both chose to wear slacks. This is fairly conclusive proof that slacks for women are an issue of fashion and not modesty.

Then again, bugger it! As the Honorable Miriam Naor walked away from the camera, I remembered, Mr Bumble’s famous saying, “the Law is an Ass.”


Nanobiotica

April 26, 2015

nanobiotica

Israel Trademark No. 246664 for “Nanobiotica” was filed by Dieteti Kol LTD. On it being allowed, Nanobiotix filed an opposition.

Nanobiotix have a pending mark of their own, No. 243678 “Nanobiotix” for classes 10, 42 and 44, and they requesting suspension of the opposition pending a decision in the Nanobiotix case which they consider as relating to the same issue. That case was the subject of a competing marks proceeding, but was allowed and is now being opposed.

Nanobiotix argues that the present proceeding should be suspended to save legal resources and to prevent contrary rulings issuing. The Applicant claims that there is ongoing negotiations towards a compromise. However, the Opposer denies that this is the case.

The Applicant does not wish to suspend the proceeding and considers the Opposer’s request as inequitable in light of the negotiations. The Applicant further considers the Opposer’s case is weak, inter alia due to them not yet having products on the market, whereas Nanobiotica is a brand that has already been launched and has clients.

Ruling

The Deputy Commissioner, Ms Jacqueline Bracha, ruled that the issue at stake is that of a pending proceedings, and that in 9/75 El Okvi vs. Israel Lands Authority, P. D. 29 (2) 477  it was ruled that the authority to suspend proceedings should be used to accomplish two aims: (i) to avoid unnecessary work for the opponent, and (ii) to avoid unnecessarily troubling the courts, which occurs where two courts rule on the same substantive, legal or factual questions and the duplication leads to a danger of inconsistency.

In the present situation the two proceedings relate to identical issues but the tribunal is identical, so there is no reason why the rulings should be contrary. Consequently, there is no rationale to suspend the hearing and Ms Bracha rejected the request.

However, since the two parties acknowledge that this issue is identical, both in terms of law and in terms of the identities of the parties involved, the two cases should be combined and heard together. This is appropriate on grounds of efficiency and to minimize use of court time, and the costs to the parties themselves. The trademark regulations do not provide guidance for combining cases, and guidance may be drawn from Regulation 530 of the Code for Civil Court Proceedings 1984.

The opposition concerning Israel Trademark No. 243678 “Nanobiotix” has reached the evidence stage and on 11 January 2015, the Opposer there, who is the applicant in this case, submitted her evidence. To facilitate combining the two cases, the combination will occur after both sides has submitted their evidence in each case. The parties may submit evidence relating to the two cases separately or in a single submission.

No costs were awarded.

COMMENT

There was an earlier interim ruling regarding posting a bond for these marks. See here. The C.E.O. of Nanobiotica, Zion Yedid, is fighting without legal representation. Nanobiotix is represented by Adin – Liss. We suspect that this has at least passing relevance to the attempt to suspend the proceeding instead of the obvious consideration to combine the cases.


Alpha Dent Implants

April 26, 2015

Alpha Dent Implants        caps

Background

Boris Simnovsky attempted to file Israel Trademark Application Number 243663 for “Alpha Dent Implants”.

Alpha Bio-Tech LTD successfully opposed the registration, presumably on grounds of Alpha being laudatory, Dent Implants being descriptive, and the combined mark being  providing a likelihood of confusion with Alpha Biotech as to the origin of the goods.

The Opposer requested costs of $5694 so The Commissioner, Asa Kling, related to the items in the list for costs in dollars as well, whilst noting his disapproval that the costs were not submitted in Shekels which is the currency that they should be billed and settled in Israel.

Alpha Bio-Tech LTD opposed the mark On 25 December 2013, the sides filed their statements and counter-statements and on 9 July 2014, after the period for filing evidence had passed, The Applicant, Boris Simnovsky, requested to withdraw the mark without a decision on costs, as he had “lost special interest in the Israel market”, and was no longer interested in the mark.

On 14 July 2014, Commissioner Kling ordered the mark withdrawn and the proceedings closed, but gave both sides the opportunity to file for costs, and on 14 September 2014, Alpha Bio-Tech LTD applied for costs.

 

Ruling

A party that gives up during contentious proceedings such as an opposition is considered as losing, see Israel TM 171160 “Pine” in KT&G Corporation vs. Dunhill Tobacco of London LTD, and Israel TM 156955 Avon Products vs. Dean L. Rhoades. The Arbitrator of TM proceedings has the authority to rule costs from Section 69 of the Trademark Ordinance 1972. When ruling on actual costs, the adjudicator is required to determine if the costs claimed are reasonable, proportional and were incurred by necessity, See Basgatz 891/05 Tnuva vs. Input Authority P.D. 60(1) p. 600-615, Nevo 30 June 2005. The relevant considerations are the legal and factual complexity of the file, the amount of work done, especially in filings to the court, the behavior of the parties with respect to each other and to the patent office, equitable behaviour, etc.

As ruled in Tnuva Section 25, the parties must detail the basis of charges and the work done, and whether these were actually collected, and then the onus moves to the loser to explain why such costs should not be paid.

The Opposer’s costs of $5694 consisted of $1298 for preparing and filing the statement of opposition including official fees, $2926 for preparing evidence and $1500 for preparing the petition of costs.

The first two actions were supported by an affidavit and receipts but the charges were the charges were global and not itemized. There was no support for the final charge, and there was not even a framework agreement with the client to do this work.

The Opposer claimed that the applicant did not submit papers in a proper manner which resulted in additional work being incurred. Furthermore, the applicant requested that the opposer withdraw the last submission and the applicant would pay $4000, but this attempt to reduce expenses was unsuccessful.

The Commissioner accepted the Applicant’s allegations that the request for costs was laconic, but did not consider that the Opposer was therefore not entitled to reasonable costs and therefore decided to rule by thumb estimation based on the actual submissions.

After relating to all the relevant considerations (but at least as laconically as the Opposer) the Commissioner ruled total costs of 18000 Shekels ($4500).

Ruling of costs awarded to Alpha Bio-Tech LTD for successfully opposing Israel Trademark 243663 “Alpha Dent Implants” to Boris Simnovsky, costs awarded by Asa Kling 15 March 2015.


DSM IP Assets Opposes IL 177724 to Refine Technologies – Striking Evidence from the Record

April 22, 2015
 Selling Culture?


Selling Culture?

Refine Technologies LLC are opposing Israel Patent Numbers 177724 and 205606 to DSM IP Assets. These applications, titled “Methods For Reducing The Degree Of Aggregation Of Aggregating Cells In A Cell Culture” are a national phase entry of PXCT/EP2005.002374 from 4 March 2005 and a divisional application thereof.

The two applications claim priority from EP 04075702.3 and EP 04075703.1 from 5 March 2004, and from EP 04077656.9 and EP 04077657.7 from 27 September 2005. The parent was allowed and published for opposition purposes on 31 January 2011 and on 27 April 2011 Refine technology LLC submitted an Opposition.
The Opposition proceeding was frozen until the divisional application was allowed and that was opposed on 29 November 2011. The two opposition proceedings were combined and the Statements of Opposition and responses were filed for the two cases together.
Both sides submitted expert opinions. In their answer to the Applicant’s response, Mr Jerry Shevitz submitted a second affidavit and the DSM IP Assets allege that this relates to art that wasn’t cited in the original statement of case and also raises new issues. The sections relating to the additional citations and new issues should be struck as an illegitimate widening of the grounds of opposition. Furthermore, they weren’t an answer to the response.
In an additional argument, DSM IP Assets alleged that Mr Jerry Shevitz relied on a decision of the South Korean court concerning a corresponding application and that this was hearsay and thus inadmissible.

Refine Technologies LLC countered that DSM IP Assets waited more than six months after Shevitz’ answer was filed and that it was thus too late to request that the references be struck from the record. They also allege that the claims were in the original statement of case and so rejected that they were illegitimately widening their opposition. They argued that the new citations weren’t new to DSM as they were cited in Korea and were only brought now, due to the response that DSM filed that ignored these references that they were familiar with. Consequently, the new citations were properly to be considered as being an answer to the Applicant’s response. As to the Korean case being a foreign court ruling, the opposer accepted that it wasn’t binding on the Israel Patent Office or in an way precedential, nevertheless it was a relevant ruling on the same issue by a respectable court and was thus admissible comparative law for the commissioner to consider.

DSM objected to the application as lacking novelty in light of US 6,544,424 from 2003, a patent now assigned to DSM. Whilst admitting that this patent did not relate to Refines ATF (alternative tangential flow) technology, they submitted that this was not relevant to the results obtained. DSM further argued that the combination of US 6,544,424 and other prior art renders the claims obvious. For good measure, they also argued that the claimed inventions were not enabled and the claims were inadequately supported.

In her Ruling, the Deputy Commissioner, Ms Jacqueline Bracha acknowledged that the submission to strike evidence could have been submitted earlier, but felt that the three months remaining to DSM before the hearing gives them adequate time to relate to the issue on its merits.

The material that Refine objected to may be categorized into three groups:

  1. Material that could have been referred to in the original opposition
  2. Material that unfairly widens the grounds for opposition
  3. Material that relates to foreign court rulings

Ms Bracha noted that Section 62 of the patent regulations only allows the opposer to file additional evidence to overcome something refuted by the applicant or in response to a new point raised by the applicant. Consequently sections 2, 19.2, 20, 24 and 41, and the related appendices which were considered as new material or widening were ordered struck from the record. As to foreign court rulings, Ms Bracha considered these relevant and helpful and that these could be submitted, whilst noting that she was in no way bound by them.

No costs were awarded.

Intermediate ruling Refines Opposition to DSM IP Assets Opposition to Israel Patent Applications 177724 and 205606, Ms Jacqueline Bracha, 16 March 2015

 


The German Federal Supreme Court Refuses Parody Trademark

April 21, 2015

Pudel

In the past, I have criticized an Israel Patent Office decision relating to Tigris, to treat all big cats the same – see here.

Now, the IPKAT has reported that the German German Federal Supreme Court (Bundesgerichtshof) has refused to allow a parody of Puma’s famous mark shown below.

PUMA

I note that the USPTO had the good sense to allow South Butt which is a parody of North Face, and think that parodies are fun and where there is o likelihood of confusion, should be allowed on grounds of free speech. It seems that the German judiciary has a less well developed sense of humour.


Vanunu’s hand

April 15, 2015

learned hand

Zoom 77 A. Sh. LTD has sued Buzz Television LTD for copyright infringement in that Buzz Television broadcast the well known photograph of Israeli traitor Mordechai Vanunu’s hand pressed against the van Uno car window, with the information that he was abducted in Rome by Israel’s Secret Service.

Instead of arguing for informational, non-profitable purposes, de minimis fair use, I am not reproducing the offending image here. Those interested in it can type Vanunu hand into their search engines.

Buzz Television LTD included the image (Vanunu’s Hand, not Learned Hand) in a documentary called the Israel Connection that was produced for Israel’s Educational Television channel. They did not receive permission to include the image and Israel’s Education Television was sued and obliged to pay compensation. See Civil Case 9260-09-12 Zoom 77 A. Sh. LTD vs. Israel Educational Television, 16 January 2014.

(ת”א (מחוזי י-ם) 9260-09-12 זום 77 א.ש (2002) בע”מ נ’ הטלוויזיה החינוכית הישראלית (16.1.2014
Buzz Television LTD used a clip including the image on their website as well, also without permission and without indicating the copyright owner. This second usage is the basis of the current law suit in which Zoom 77 claimed 80,000 NIS compulsory compensation without proof of damage under Section 56 of the Israel Copyright Act 2007.
Buzz Television LTD accepted that the image was owned by Zoom and that displaying it on Buzz’ website was an infringing use. The point of contention was the appropriate compensation in the circumstances.

Section 56b of the Law brings various relevant considerations for setting the compensation including the scope of infringement, its longevity, its seriousness, actual damages, profits to the infringer, the defendant’s activities, the relationship between plaintiff and defendant and inequitable behaviour.

In the present instance, Judge Gideon Gidoni of the Jerusalem Magistrate’s Court noted that the photograph has significant journalistic value and was used to market and promote the defendant’s activities. On the other hand, no evidence was given by the plaintiff regarding the traffic to the website in general and the clip in particular. The Defendant claimed that the clip was a minor component on the website and hardly watched.

No evidence was provided as to how long the image was displayed, but one can assume that the defendant was involved in the case against Israel Educational Television 18 months earlier, and could and should have taken down the clip. Buzz Television is a production company working in the media industry and should be aware of copyright issues and should consequently be highly aware of other’s creative rights. The cost of licensed use of the image was 1600 Shekels.

Judge Gidoni noted the damages paid by Israel Educational Television 18,000 Shekels for first infringement and then 50,000 Shekels for a second infringement last year, and that this was a repeat, albeit indirect infringement of the same product.

He also related to third parties reproducing other news images, including Rachmani v. Israel News 2011 (15000 Shekels for an iconic news image)  the learned, but perhaps not very analytic judge ruled compensation of 25000 Shekels. Civil Appeal Basketball League Management vs. Rachmani (the famous Tal Brody lifting the European trophy “we are on the tablecloth map” where 18000 Shekels was ruled and Kfar Blum Kayaks vs. Manara Cliff 2012, where 75000 Shekels was awarded for moral rights infringed by not mentioning the name of the photographer of the tourist attraction.

In another recent case, Zoom sued Tratkover and was awarded 22000 Shekels.

Judge Gidoni ruled 25000 Shekels compensation, 1000 Shekels costs and 3000 Shekels legal fees.

Sh-14-02-30214-730 Zoom 7 vs.Buzz television re Vanunu’s hnad photo, Judge Gidoni, Jerusalem Magistrates Court, 8 April 2015.

COMMENT

Vanunu set up the picture. The handwriting, font and content of the writing on his hand is his copyright. He was also responsible for positioning his hand on the car window and for his posture. Perhaps he deserves royalties as much as he is deserved his jail sentence?  The journalists that caught the image did very little artistic creation, and arguably whoever crops the image for insertion into a newspaper deserves as much credit and name recognition.

There is certainly a value in fidelity of the law, and levels of compensation for similar infringing acts by different parties should, perhaps, be similar. I would, however, like to feel that judges can analyze and reach sophisticated conclusions and not merely bean count.

I believe that there are iconic images, film clips, sound tracks and the like that have a place in any documentary or dramatization of significant history. I think it ridiculous that a birthday party in a film won’t include children singing Happy Birthday. A film of Martin Luther King couldn’t reproduce his “I have a dream” speech.

In Israel, Holocaust Memorial Day starts this evening. When looking for two rapper versions of Israel’s National ANthem, Hatikveh that were the basis of a copyright infringement proceedings, I discovered a BBC radio clip of the first Friday night Kabbalat Shabbat Service from Bergen Belsen after the camp was liberated. After singing the Hatikveh, one clearly hears the then British Chaplain, the Late Reverend Hardman announcing that the people of Israel live. I sent the clip to his grandson, Danny Verbov who thanked me, and told me that he;s sent the clip about one a month. He kindly sent me a copy of Rev Hardman’s sermons that he’d edited. (I am ashamed to say that I used to go out to play during the sermons).

Now, Danny (and presumably the BBC) could have sued me for downloading and copying or linking to copyright material. At one suing a month Danny would solve the problem of spam email and have a nice sideline. Thankfully he is a mensch and has more sense.

I’d like to see standard reproduction royalties for usage of these literary and artistic creations.

I have illustrated this post with a picture of the US judge who detailed the various considerations regarding compensation for patent infringement in Georgia Pacific vs. American Plywood. The reason for referencing this is not just that he found 15 Factors of relevance, which sounds like an extended family seder, or even that the judge is called Learned Hand. I think his analysis is of relevance when calculated copyright royalties as well as patent royalties.

As always, comments and feedback are welcome.


So Israel took his journey with all that he had, and came to Beersheba (Genesis 46)

April 14, 2015

park Carusso

Yesterday I enjoyed a pleasant trip down South to attend the WIPO Roving Seminar in Beer Sheva. The drive was pleasant. Negev is very verdant and the ornithology was good, with a lot of storks and black kites and the odd short-toed eagle in evidence. The event started at 9:30, and, with considerably less congestion getting into Beer Sheva than into Tel Aviv, I arrived at 9:15 am at the Carusso Science Park.

Moshe Lemberg, the Senior Program Officer at WIPO who organized the event introduced himself to me and hoped that I would blog about the refreshments. I thought this was a little surprising as the rogelach and burekas were fairly standard fayre but did make a welcome breakfast. Unfortunately however, the 3 litre hot water urn was inadequate to the task and I was unable to make myself a coffee. That had an adverse affect on my concentration during the first part of the program, and I noted that after Dr Daniel Ben Oliel presented the prize for Excelling Academic thesis in various fields of IP [sic] there were three or four competitors who presented brief talks on their papers for the Israel Patent Office Competition, but have no idea what they talked about. The chairs were too comfortable, I’d left home at 7 am and I was too far away from the screen. My neighbor kept nudging me. I suspect I was snoring a little. I went to the bathroom, washed my face and had a coffee (botz, using water from the now refilled urn), and went back in sitting closer to the front. This was a great improvement and I found the sessions interesting, stimulating and enjoyable.

Those wanting a review of the early sessions are respectfully referred to the IPKAT where the Doyen of IP Bloggers, Professor Jeremy Phillips has some insightful and relevant comments. See here.  For inciteful and irrelevant ones, read on!

Professor Phillips notes that there were 98 registrants. He was sitting in the back corner and was better situated to count heads than I was. I do try to keep tally on these events however, and did a head count on three occasions throughout the day. I noted 60 in the audience. With 5 rovers from WIPO and a large contingent from the patent office, this was less than impressive. I hope that the Haifa event on Tuesday is better attended, and as the program is largely the same, can highly recommend it.

PCT

PC Tea

PC Tea

Mr Matthew Bryan, the director of the PCT Legal Division gave a brief review of the PCT system and recent developments, and the amicable and helpful Dr Michael Bart who heads up the Israel Receiving Office spke about recent changes there. The local Beer Sheva (actually Omer – but who’se counting?) Mukhtar Patent Attorney, Dr Kfir Luzzatto joined Matthew and Michael, and gave some thoughts on the PCT, how Israel joining the system had affected the profession, and how he views International Search Reports from the Israel Patent Office.

Trademarks and Designs

Ms Debbie Roenning, Director of the Legal Division Madrid Register, Brands and Designs Section (BDS) spoke on Madrid system for trademark registration and then on the Hague system for Design Registration.  As well as showing which countries had signed up, she showed which countries were in the process of signing up which was useful. She also had some tips regarding tailoring goods for different jurisdictions, translating the list of goods into Hebrew, adding countries to an existing application and varying classes per country that were very informative.

Ms Anat Levi Sofer spoke briefly about trademarks and Madrid from the perspective of the Israel Patent Office and considered Israel joining Madrid a great success. Ms Ronit Bazik Sofer, head of trademarks at Reinhold Cohn represented the private sector and noted that she had been apprehensive of Israel joining Madrid and indeed, there had been a drop off in work since Israel joined, but with increased prosecution, things had evened out.

Knowing the official figures regarding trademarks filed directly into Israel and via Madrid, and Madrid marks originating in Israel, I think that both Ms Anat Levi Sofer and Ms Ronit Bazik Sofer were being less than objective. (Reinhold Cohn has too large a market segment for their practice not to follow the official statistics). Israel is very good at creating technology, but is less successful at launching international brands. Madrid has not been widely used by Israeli companies. It is possible that with additional prosecution resulting from more trademark applications designating Israel, workers in the trademark office and in private practice feel that they are busy. However, without the lucrative filing and with renewals handled centrally or by bucket shops, the revenues generated are lower that revenues once were. This is true of both patent office revenue and income to IP firms.

There was an opportunity to ask questions. In her first slide, Ms Roenning had shown various recent Israel trademarks filed by Israelis. The slide also included WIPO’s logo. It was tempting to ask why they had chosen what look’s like a roll of toilet paper, but I decided that it would unnecessarily cheapen the event.

Wipe-o

WIPE-O !

WIPO’s Arbitration and Mediation Center

Mr Matthew Bryan gave a presentation regarding WIPO’s arbitration and mediation services.  It was certainly worthwhile reminding those present that there are alternative methods of dispute resolution, and that going to court is not the only option.

Databases

Mr. Yoshiyuki Takagi spoke about WIPO’s databases such as WIPO Green and WIPO Re:Search. This brought some useful online tools to the attention of participants.

Lunch

ravioli

We were pleasantly surprised that WIPO / Patent Office had laid on a sumptuous buffet of ravioli, pizza, macaroni, cheese rolls, garlic bread, quiches, cheeses and salads. Had this been a couple of days after Shavuot (Pentacost) this may have seemed more of the same, but after a week of Pesach, noone passed over the opportunity to dine on hametz.

Copyright 

real life

Mr. Paolo Lanteri, the Legal Officer, Copyright Law Division, Culture and Creative Industries Sector, WIPO spoke about the gaming industry. It seems that I was far from the only participant who wasn’t a gamer. I put this down to a combination of the audience being middle aged nerds.

It was fascinating to learn that the gaming industry is more significant financially than feature films and music combined. Happily people still read.

It seems that protecting IP in games is a complicated issue. The talk was very informative.

Questions were solicited and I made a case for moving over to registration of copyright and shorter periods of protection since I consider the system as broken. Jeremy Phillips took issue with my position and argued that most people in practice can do most of what they want and that the system does give redress for abuses. We continued arguing in the car back to Jerusalem.

Closing session

men in suits

The WIPO representatives and the Commissioner got on stage together as a panel. It was reassuring with INTA coming up, to note that my charcoal suit is apparently in fashion for IP events.

Dr Luzzatto took the opportunity to ask about Arab countries boycotting Israel, giving the example of Jordan that, despite a peace agreement, in practice the legal profession there won’t represent Israelis.

Mr Matthew Bryan first dodged the question by noting that Jordan was not a signatory to the PCT. As Kfir would not let things go at that, he rather sensibly pointed out that WIPO strongly condemns Arab countries discriminating against Israel, and writes strongly worded letters noting that such countries are not living up to their international obligations. He did, however, point out WIPO does not have enforcement police and their influence is very limited.

The Commissioner noted that Israel could theoretically refuse to allow applications originating from countries that don’t accept Israeli trademark or patent applications, but that the Israel Patent Office decided not to adopt this policy.

Retired US patent attorney Bruce Lilling noted that Taiwan, an important industrial nation was kicked out of the PCT mechanism at China’s request.

Recommendation

For those who missed the Beer Sheva event yesterday, I recommend trying to attend the largely parallel but slightly shorter program in Haifa tomorrow. See here.

Gratuitous Political Rambling Digression (its my blog so I can do what I like)

I note that Ms Debbie Roenning (who also wore a trouser suit, but not a tie) is the head of the Brands and Designs Section which shares the unfortunate acronym of BDS, the ‘Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions’ Movement, the allegedly pro Palestinian, but actually notoriously hypocritical and anti-Semitic international movement.

On the way to the conference, I noted Sodastream’s new factory in Beer Sheva. They moved from the Industrial Area by Maale Adumim (a satellite town of Jerusalem on the road towards Jericho) in response to vicious propaganda abroad. In the Maale Adumim factory, Sodastream provided jobs to West Bank Arabs and was a model of co-existence. Forced to relocate, the primary sufferers are the West Bank Arabs.
WIPO is one of the least anti-Israel organs of the UN. I think it might have been very worthwhile for them to have invited Jordanian, Palestinian and Egyptian IP professionals, both government and private, to the event. I am on good terms with professional colleagues in all these jurisdictions, and with others in Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and elsewhere, who read this blog, and chat amicably with me at INTA, AIPPI and other international conferences. Peace is made by trade.

Of course, Israel is not the only country to have been boycotted. To advance U.S. foreign policy and national security objectives, the U.S. maintains laws and regulations that impose economic sanctions against certain countries, individuals, and entities (the “U.S. Sanctions Program”).  31 C.F.R. § 501 et seq.  The Office of Foreign Asset Control (“OFAC”) at the Department of the Treasury manages the U.S. Sanctions Program.  The U.S. Sanctions Program prohibits U.S. nationals and U.S. companies from doing business in embargoed or sanctioned countries and from doing business with individuals or entities subject to U.S. sanctions laws and regulations.  At various times, the US has forbidden their nationals to register trademarks in Cuba and has also failed to uphold Cuban trademarks. Whether or not human rights are more mistreated by Castro’s regime in Cuba or by the US in the Guantanamo Bay prison camp is not clear.


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