Registering Designs for Garments

Fashion is an industry where the innovator benefits from a lead time as first mover, but most manufacturers follow trends and though designs may be registered, usually they are not. Copyright may protect exact copying, but generally this is also not an appropriate tool.
Recently, the international fashion brand Diesel, represented by Adv. Daniel Freimann, managed to obtain an injunction against Israeli clothing retailers Hoodies for copying a design of jeans.
Diesel's jeans are shown here:

 diesel from front  diesel from back

Hoodies jeans are shown here:

hoodies from front   hoodies from back

Diesel’s design has a high waist, are form hugging and have stitching extending from the bottom of the pockets, at the knees and at the back of the legs.  

This stitching detail is somewhat unique. Hoodies claimed that their jeans were not a copy, and were considerable cheaper and noted that the decorative stitching on the back pocket was somewhat different. They also argued that the Diesel’s design was for blue and white jeans only. The judge accepted that the back pocket stitiching was different, however, since Hoodies’ jeans had the same basic shape and included such stitching. 

Diesel had filed design applications (nos. 50526 and 51929 and claimed 11 and 9 novel features respectively. Hoodies argued that their jeans did not have all the elements. The judge considered that the issue is one of the impression of the garment as a whole and not one of analyzing novel features against a checklist. 

Hoodies accepted that Diesel had a reputation, but not one for the specific design. Since their jeans were sold at about 15% of Diesel’s prices and since the design was not well known, there was no case of passing off or likely consumer confusion. 

As to the registered design, Hoodies claimed that prior to it being filed, the jeans were on sale, so the design registration was void.

Judge Yaakov Shepser of the Central District Court noted that despite the differences, Hoodies had produced no evidence that there were other jeans on the market that were in this style, and that Hoodies’ jeans included at least 4 or the 9 new design elements. The judge also considered that there was a likelihood of consumer confusion. The Judge therefore ruled an injunction against Hoodies.

Hoodies claimed that as a basic Israeli clothing company, they were ‘honoured’ that Diesel had taken note of them.

 COMMENT

If Hoodies can show that the registered designs are void due to publication prior to filing, or at least that the stitching on knees, front pocket and back of trouser leg was used in Diesel or other jeans prior to the design registration, I think they should prevail.

If, however, there are valid design registrations for these features, I think the judge is correct that combining them with different decorative pocket stitches should still be considered infringing

 

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