Sony Clamps Down on Pirate Computer Games

Pirate
Sony Entertainment sued Azam Gever claiming copyright infringement and unjust enrichment, alleging that Gever’s computer shop “McKan Computers” on the main road through Osefiya sold fake disks with games for the Sony Playstation console.
In his defense, Gever claimed to be ignorant of the fact that the disks he was selling were not originals. If Gever could successfully convince that he was unwittingly distributing fake disks, he would not be held responsible. If, however, this defense collapsed, he would be held responsible for damages.
Sony claimed to have copyright in the Playstation and Playstation 2, and in software for the Playstation. They also claimed to own trademarks 95025 and 95026 for Playstation. Sony Entertainment Europe was responsible for distributing in Europe, the Middle East, Africa and the Pacific Rim and franchised distribution rights for the software within those territories, including Israel.
Playstation programs can only be played using the Playstation interface due to special encryption. Any copying, burning to disk of a Playstation game will, inter alia, include copying of the encryption which is copyright infringement of Sony’s copyright. Sony claimed that they are in a perpetual war to prevent their software from being pirated, and that they have spent enormous sums in advertising and promoting the console, They have copyright notices on the disks, on the packages, and appearing on screen.
The defendant did not deny selling pirate CDs but denied knowing that they were pirate copies. Sony sent a private investigator to the shop to see what was being sold. The private investigator and his son testified that they were both independently told that the programs were copies, and that the owner had shown a box of bundles of 50 disks, containing 3 or 4 copies of each game. The private investigator testified that he bought five different games at 10 shekels ($2.50) each, paid 50 Shekels and received a tax invoice for 50 Shekels that indicated thatit was for Sony II disks. The private investigator filmed the visit and submitted the footage as an exhibit. The games purchased included Beyond Good and Evil, Dragon’s Quest, God’s hand, Spy Hunter, and Fifa 2013.
The Plaintiff alleged that inspection of the disks showed clearly that they were fakes that infringed Sony’s Copyright since they were not in cardboard packages with shrink-wrapped cellophane or new DVD boxes and did not include instruction booklets. Unlike the originals, the disks did not have pictures on them and were not stamped with Sony’s logo and copyright notice. Sony sent a Cease & Desist letter and asked for the pirated disks to be handed over and for accounts to be produced for calculating profits and infringement revenue. The parties were, however, unable to come to an amicable settlement and so this case was filed. In the statement of case, Gever was accused of copying or creating fraudulent copies, selling or offering to sell these in the course of his business, offering to sell and holding fake copies thereby infringing the copyright, without permission of Sony and without compensating Sony.
In addition to the copyright charges, Sony alleged unjust enrichment under the law of Unjust Enrichment 1979 and various trade related torts for damaging Sony’s reputation.
Sony sued for compulsory damages of 100,000 Shekels per infringement under Section 56a of the Copyright Law 2007. Claiming years of fraud, Sony requested increased damages of 150,000 Shekels and also applied for an injunction against Gever to prevent him from selling fake disks directly or indirectly.
Gever laconically acknowledged ownership of the shop and that he’d sold programs against the tax invoice, but denied selling or trading in fake software. Gever further alleged that he’d bring expert witness that the software was genuine.
In the preliminary hearing, Gever repeated that the disks were genuine and that he was unaware of “the material”. In a second preliminary hearing he again requested to examine the disks. After the parties held a brief discussion, the attorney for the plaintiff stated that the defendant claims that he sells computers, disks is a mere sideline that produces at most, 1% of income and that if it should transpire that the disks are indeed fake, he was unaware of this. In Gever’s own statement under cross-examination, he complained that he wasn’t warned, that he only sells a handful of disks each month and never claimed that they were originals. His lawyer clarified that the intention was to state that his client was unaware that the disks were not real. Meanwhile, the private investigator testified that there were a number of disks with the name of the program marked in permanent ink and that when discussing Playstation 3, the vendor had stated that copying it was problematic. Gever claimed that there weren’t more than 30 disks and that this wasn’t a commercial number. He admitted selling computers for 13 years and that he had sold Playstations for at least a decade, but claimed to sell very little software.
Under cross-examination, Gever claimed to obtain and sell original software on a request basis and to sell a handful of fakes each month. Some his brother supplied, some a friend, not sure from where, some he’d copied himself. He denied selling 60 a year, or 600 over the decade. He considered this non-commercial as he had a limited range of maybe 20 games.
The plaintiff requested to correct the statement of case to request 250,000 Shekels damages, alleging that even at the rate of 5 disks a month, this adds up to hundreds of disks over a decade. (I feel a lawyer joke coming on. It seems that neither the judge, not the attorneys were able to do the calculation).
The defendant objected to the sum being corrected. He also alleged that for sales prior to the new copyright law coming into effect in 2008, the maximum statutory damage is 10,000 Shekels (or 20,000 Shekels for willful infringement.

RULING
Despite Regulation 92 of the Civil Court Procedures 1984 allowing extensive corrections to the statement of case to enable the point of contention to be clarified, correcting the sum after the hearing and before ruling is not allowed as it does nothing to clarify the legal issues and will merely protract the proceedings. The plaintiffs alleged that Gever had sold tens if not hundreds of fakes over a period of years and nothing had changed, so the maximum sum claimed remains 150,000 Shekels.
Judge Weinstein ruled that merely selling fake disks was insufficient to be responsible, but the seller had to be aware that they were fakes. In this instance, some he’d scanned himself, others were supplied from an unknown source so it seems clear that he was aware. Furthermore, a computer seller would be expected to be able to differentiate between originals and fakes. The price of 10 Shekels a game was also a fair indication that they were fake.
The private investigator’s footage showed boxes of 50 or more games, and this was a commercial number. The private investigator’s testimony was sufficient to indicate that the vendor was aware that the goods were fake. However, the issue is moot as during cross-examination he admitted copying some of the programs himself.
The problem, was, as always, the burden of proof required. After humming and hawing about the need to warn others not to copy, the admitted sales of small amounts over time and the evidence of 5 separate games, Ms Weinstein ruled damages of 50,000 Shekels and costs of 10,000 Shekels.
52260-01-14 Sony vs. Gever, Ruling Judge Weinstein 16 March 2015

COMMENT
The disks were sold in Osefiya by Shfaram. In the past, a DVD copying factory was discovered in Kiryat Ata.
Personally, I am inclined to believe that Gever sold very little software. Why should anyone not picky about purchasing originals pay 10 shekels if blank DVDs cost half a shekel and everyone has a disk burner?
Not allowing the sum claimed to be increased is one thing, but I think that on the burden of evidence and not requiring actual damages, but statutory damages, Ms Weinstein had sufficient evidence to rule the 150,000 Shekels damages. Not unreasonable for a sideline operating 10 years.

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