Does Size Matter? Dun & Bradstreet Publish their Silly Stats Again

1.Does Size Matter

Dun and Bradstreet has published their annual IP rankings once again. See here for the Globes article based on the Dun & Bradstreet 2015 rankings.

As readers of this blog will know, I consider the rankings infantile. D & B ranks based on the number of patent attorneys and this year, Reinhold Cohn with 43 patent attorneys has been knocked off its perch as Israel’s largest IP firm by Pearl Cohen, the new branding of PCZ”L that allegedly employs 46 patent attorneys. It seems that Dun & Bradstreet would fail their matriculation in both Maths and Geography.

The problem is that whereas Reinhold actually employs 37 patent attorneys in Israel and a further several attorneys-in-law that work in Intellectual Property, and these are all bona fide employees or partners and are all licensed, Pearl Cohen does not employ 46 patent attorneys in Israel.

Unfortunately, Pearl Cohen and D&B are somewhat misleading regarding what a patent attorney is, what an Israel licensed patent attorney is, what an Israel firm is, what an employee is and what part of the world may be considered part of Israel.

Allow me to elaborate:

1. There is a confusion between general attorneys-at-law and patent attorneys. The 55,000 odd Israel licensed attorneys-at-law may practice before the Israel patent office, but only a small fraction have any IP competence whatsoever, and a smaller fraction still understand anything about patents.

2. To practice before the USPTO one needs to be an US Patent Agent or a US Patent Attorney.

3. Pearl Cohen has a US office, a Boston office and a UK office. The employees of these offices cannot be considered as being part of an Israel firm, unless, of course, one considers Finnegan, the US’s largest IP firm as being an Israel IP firm by virtue of their Israel office and website. Finnegan has only one attorney, Gerson Panitch, based, part-time in Israel (he is actually based in Washington DC according to Finnegan’s website). If Finnegan is an Israel IP Firm, they are clearly larger than Pearl Cohen. Actually, from his profile, I am not sure that Gerson is a patent attorney licensed to practice before the USPTO, but that’s beside the point. According to the warning previously published on the Israel Patent Office website, it is also illegal for anyone other than Israeli attorneys-at-law and Israel patent attorneys to advise clients in Israel:

הובא לידיעתנו, כי אנשים שאינם עורכי דין או עורכי פטנטים עוסקים לכאורה, בשכר, בפעילות שנתייחדה לעורכי דין ולעורכי פטנטים, ובכלל זה הכנת מסמכים המוגשים לרשם הפטנטים בישראל ובחו”ל, גם אם אינם חותמים על המסמכים בשם הלקוח.כל אדם מהציבור הזקוק לשירותי ייעוץ ורישום בתחום הפטנטים, סימני המסחר והמדגמים מוזהר בזאת שלא לפנות לאותם גורמים הפועלים בצורה בלתי חוקית, שכן הסתייעות באותם גורמים עלולה לגרום להם נזק בלתי הפיך.

This is a rough translation:

Let it be known that people who are not patent attorneys or attorneys at law apparently practice, for payment, services that can only be provided by patent attorneys or attorneys at law, including preparation of documents for submitting to the Israel Patent Office and to foreign patent offices, even if they don’t sign in the name of the client. Any member of the public who needs advice or registration services relating to patents, trademarks and designs is hereby warned not to turn to such illegal practitioners, since doing so may result in irreversible damage.

This is based on Section 20(4) of the Israel Bar Law (Professional Ethics) 1988 which forbids anyone who is not a licensed attorney-at-law in Israel (or an exception, such as a Patent Attorney for IP Law) from giving legal advice. Note, I am not sure that the Israel Patent Office’s interpretation of this law is in accordance with International Obligations, and arguably (as Mr Panitch argues), a US attorney can advise re US law. Even if he is correct, I suspect that the advice will be lacking when it comes from a US attorney not licensed in Israel, as there are Israel tax and other issues that affect the decision making process. Consequently, even when the jurisdiction of interest is the US, China or Europe, an Israel firm is advised to work with foreign counsel via a local practitioner.

The one shop model of a firm with US, Israel and European offices is also, not necessarily in the client’s interest. If a local firm drafts the application and a separate US firm (and not a branch of the same firm) makes a decision regarding whether or not to litigate in the US, it is likely that the additional level of review will avoid the filing of frivolous law suits such as the Source Origin case.

4. An employee is someone who works for a company and receives a salary. Pearl Cohen has a highly dubious arrangement by which attorneys and patent attorneys that work for them are considered as not being employees and new employees are coerced into signing a statement to that effect.  Pearl Cohen’s professional employees are perhaps best considered as being free-lancers. Pearl Cohen does not pay the license fees of these professionals.

5. There are 19 patent attorneys that list their address in the Israel Patent Office database as working for Pearl Cohen in Herzliya. This is a mere 41% of the 46 patent attorneys that Pearl Cohen claims to employ. This list includes Assaf Weiler who is living in the UK according to Pearl Cohen’s website. It also includes Zeev Pearl who according to Pearl Cohen’s website is considered the managing partner working from the New York office. Pearl is licensed in Israel, but is not licensed as a patent attorney in the US.

I can’t opine about the legality of this situation since I am not licensed in the US. For those interested in exploring this further, see New York City : 1st Department, Chief Counsel, First Judicial Department, Departmental Disciplinary Committee, 61 Broadway, 2nd Floor, New York, NY10006, (212) 401-0800, Fax: (212) 287-104, Website: www.courts.state.ny.us/ip/attorneygrievance/complaints.shtml Also see the unauthorized practice of law committee in New York.  Their contact information is as follows: Kathleen Mulligan Baxter, New York State Bar Association, One Elk Street, Albany, NY12207, Tel: 518/463-3200, Fax: 518/487-5694 kbaxter@nysba.org See also ABA Formal Opinion 01-423 Forming Partnerships With Foreign Lawyers (2001). Report 201H (Licensing of Legal Consultant) Report 201J (Temporary Practice by Foreign Lawyers) as presented by the ABA Multijurisdictional Practice Commission and adopted by the ABA House of Delegates in 2003. See Also Report 107C as Amended by the ABA Ethics 20/20 Commission (ABA Model Rule on Pro Hac Vice Admission) that was adopted by the House of Delegates in 2013.

Of course, size isn’t everything. Pearl Cohen’s employment arrangement is not limited to that firm, and some competing firms have similar practices. I consider the model unethical, not least because it is both open to abuse by the ’employer’ and is frequently abused.

Dun and Bradstreet’s table has other problems. For example, Colb does not appear in the table listing the top 12 firms, and I am fairly sure that they are larger in terms of number of Israel Patent Attorneys than some of the firms that are listed.  Despite losing much of his litigation team recently, I think Dr Shlomo Cohen Law Office has enough Lawyers and patent attorneys working in IP to enter the table. There are, of course, also very large Israel law firms that have one or more patent attorney or IP lawyer working for them. Shibboleth and Shin Horowitz come to mind.

What is, of course, of more interest to clients is the competence and track record of the individual attorney who handles their files. Some of Israel’s best patent practitioners in private practice, including patent attorneys work for small firms or are sole practitioners.  This is true of both patent attorneys that draft and prosecute patents, and litigators that fight validity issues. It is also true of trademark attorneys, many of the better ones in Israel work for small firms.

The size of an IP firm can provide depth of knowledge and experience, but this is not necessarily the case. There are few economies of scale in this industry, and Parkinson’s Laws go a long way to explain why the same service from larger firms is more expensive, yet the sole practitioners and partners of smaller firms are usually better off financially than their colleagues in the larger practices.

The lists of IP firms put out by the professional magazines is also skewed towards the larger firms. The more attorneys that club together to form a single shop window, the more and larger clients they are likely to attract. The irony is that the when a successful attorney decides to grow his or her firm, the head attorney does more administration and less legal work, and is likely to take on less competent staff who are less of a threat. The more competent staff tend to break away and form their own firms. The upshot is that the average ability per attorney is generally lower in the bigger firms. A more objective statistic of a firm is the average billing per attorney, or something similar that normalizes absolute values by the number of practitioners.

3 Responses to Does Size Matter? Dun & Bradstreet Publish their Silly Stats Again

  1. Shazam! says:

    I met with Zev Pearl a number of years ago. He had recently taken the New York bar exam. When the list of people who passed the examination was published, his name was not there. Perhaps if he’d bothered to learn the law, his firm could have avoided those nasty sanctions.

  2. Just the Facts says:

    It is very easy to find out if someone is registered at the USPTO. Gerson Panitch is a registered US patent attorney (reg # 33751). Zeev Pearl is a registered US patent agent (reg # 60234). Your arguments might be more compelling if the facts were verified.

    • Zeev Pearl is the head of a US law firm. He is not a qualified US patent attorney. He may well be a patent agent, but that is not the same thing.
      Gerson Panitsch is not licensed in Israel but gives legal advice here.

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