IPR or AIPPI???

February 27, 2018

conferencesI was contacted by a trainee patent attorney who wishes to attend one of the forthcoming IP conferences in Israel but is not sure which one is better value for money.  The firm where she works are prepared to recognize her attendance as a day of work rather than a vacation, but are not prepared to pay for her participation.

ipr-logoThe 6th Annual Best Practices in Intellectual Property is hosted by the IPR and will take place on March 12th and 13th 2018.

 

aippi-israelThe Third International Conference on the Economics of Innovation is hosted by the AIPPI on April 30th-May 1st 2018 which may interfere with participation in International Workers’ Day, but I suspect that few IP practitioners in Israel actually march.

(The big international conferences fall over Jewish festivals this year. INTA is in Seattle, USA, but overlaps Shavuot. The AIPPI 2018 World Conference in Cancun, Mexico is over Suckot).

Although I believe that firms taking on trainees should invest in them and both the IPR and AIPPI Israel conferences include sessions that provide excellent training for the bar exams and/or professional development, clearly the cost of such conferences adds up rapidly for large firms if they send all of their staff. I can also appreciate why an IP firm may not want someone not yet qualified appear to represent them, when wandering around a conference and meeting potential clients and associates or actual clients and associates.

apprentice payNevertheless, on the salary of a trainee, particularly one with family commitments, both conferences are costly. A significant number of trainees are new immigrants that are self-not living with their parents. Those unluckily enough to be on a percentage of salary may not earn a minimum wage and I believe their ‘mentors’ should be struck off. But even those earning a reasonable fixed trainee salary may find that laying out 850 Shekels for a day of training lectures, is difficult to justify, despite the high quality lunch and coffee breaks and the possibility to pick up a couple of pieces of swag from exhibitors.

fair priceThis does not mean that either conference is objectively expensive when considering the standard of the program and the costs involved in hosting such events in expensive hotels, the quality of the refreshments and the cost of such programs abroad. However, I can certainly see why someone paying for himself or herself may not be able to justify for both events.

mingling 2Licensed In-House practitioners may well be able to get their companies to pick up the tab for them to attend both conferences, and unless swamped with urgent work, I can see many IP managers preferring to schmooze with colleagues and to attend lectures rather than sitting in their offices.  I suspect the coffee break refreshments and lunches provided also compare well to the canteen food or lunch voucher allowance of most hi-tech companies.

trainingIP boutiques are, of course, able to evaluate the relevance of the training for their different staff members, and will no-doubt consider this when deciding who to send to which conference.

As with all such conferences, some sessions will be highly relevant to one’s day to day work, but perhaps lacking in material one doesn’t already know. Similarly, some sessions will be focused on IP issues that may be completely irrelevant to one’s day to day practice.  In this regard, apart from keynote lectures, both conferences have parallel sessions, and one is advised to carefully select presentations to attend that are at least one of the adjectives selected from the group comprising: relevant, intellectually stimulating and informative.

bpip 2018The Best Practices in Intellectual Property conference hosted by Kim Lindy and the IPR is perhaps mis-named. Apart from one session on trade-secrets, the entire program is dedicated to patents and the conference is very much focused on practical aspects of patent management. The conference is particularly targeted at In-House counsel in industry and has much to interest independent patent attorneys in private practice, partners and attorneys at IP firms. However, it seems to have little of interest to those who earn their living managing trademark or copyright portfolios. Sadly in my opinion, it also does not address design law which is a rapidly changing field in Israel.

jam packedThere will be little at the “Best Practices in Intellectual Property” conference to interest academics. However, the program is jam-packed with relevant sessions for prosecuting patents and managing patent portfolios which is what very many in-house IP managers do, and also is the bread-and-butter work of most patent attorneys in private practice.

variety packThe AIPPI conference titled “The Economics of Innovation” uses the term innovation very widely and is much broader in scope than the “Best Practices in Intellectual Property” conference In that features sessions on trade-secrets, design law, trademarks, Copyright, traditional knowledge, taxation of IP and Internet & Privacy. Many of the sessions look at the issue of overlapping types of protection.

madagascan periwinkle

Madagascan Periwinkle, used to treat Hodgkin’s Disease

One of the AIPPI sessions is titled “Traditional Medicine – the influence of IP on Commercial Use and Economic Aspects”. This is not the first time the topic of traditional knowledge has been covered in Israel. Back in 2011, I helped
Dr Shlomit Yantizky Ravid of ONO Academic College organize a three-day traditional knowledge conference that brought representatives from a large number of developing countries and sympathetic US academics that was sponsored by WIPO.  Dr Irving Treitel, a patent attorney who deals with life science patents, especially pharmaceuticals (who was then working for me at JMB Factor & Co.) responded on behalf of the profession. Prof. Shuba Ghosh was the keynote speaker then, as now. Despite much advertising in the press, only some 30-40 people participated in the conference – virtually all speakers of foreign delegates. Apart from Dr Treitel and myelf, I don’t recall any other IP practitioners attending that free conference. I applaud the AIPPI bringing IP issues to the attention of local practitioners, but I doubt that this session will attract a large attendance despite the prestigious panelists.

 

taxCertainly patent attorneys, whether in-house or in private practice, should be familiar with the different types of protection available to be able to advise or at least refer clients.  Patent Attorneys should also be aware of tax issues, at least broadly, to be able to refer their clients to accountants where appropriate to do so. There are very many large US firms registered in Delaware that conduct R&D in Israel. There are also many firms that are physically based in Israel, but decide to incorporate in the US for political reasons, and these include start-ups as well as larger firms. I have clients that have fairly small staff but are incorporated as an IP holding company that owns the patents, trademarks, copyrights and designs and a separate manufacturing company that licenses the IP assets. The tax issues are not something that a patent attorney deals with, but attorneys-in-law may practice IP and tax law, and in-house legal counsel may deal with IP and taxation.  Apart from understanding how tax issues affect their own income and how various taxes can be legally avoided and what is considered illegal evasion and criminal, I believe that IP professionals not practicing tax law should nevertheless have a general grasp of the tax issues that face their clients to be able to advise them where they should seek guidance from a tax attorney, accountant of tax-consultant.

In summary, both conferences are value for money. People only having the time or budget to attend one should consider which one to go very carefully, and it is worth working out in advance which sessions to attend.


Copyright in Numerology

December 12, 2017

numerologyNumerology is any belief in the divine, mystical relationship between a number and one or more coinciding events. It is also the study of the numerical value of the letters in words, names and ideas. It is often associated with the paranormal, alongside astrology and similar divinatory arts.

gamatriya chartIn gamatriya, each letter of the Hebrew Alphabet is assigned a corresponding number. the first nine letters are numbered 1 to 9, and the next nine are assigned the numbers 10, 20, 30, etc. The final four letters are assigned the values 100, 200, 300, 400.

The word alphabet comes from the Greek Alpha Beta, and the word gamatriya comes from Gamma – t(h)reeya. That said, the Greek alphabet was based on the Hebrew and Phoenician precedents. The Latin letters were derived from the Greek ones.

The issue in question here, is whether copying sections of verbal lectures and publishing them in writing is considered copyright infringement.

In coming to their verdict, the Supreme Court has reviewed the differences between the onld and new, law, what fixation is required and in what circumstnaes a publisher or distributor can be considered as innocently infringing.

The Case

Sharon Ron is a numerology lecturer. In 2002 Ela Shonia attended his numerology course at the Association for Promoting Awareness in Haifa. At the lectures, handouts and exercises were distributed by Ron. In 2003, Shonia and a fellow student called Sarah Vakhnin attended private lessons given by Ron at his home in Kfar Sava.

Numerology 3rd milleniumIn 2004, Shonia published a book titled “Numerology for the third millenium” which went to three editions, the last one in 2010. In 2010 Shonia published a second book titled Combined Numerology. Both books were published by Astrologue Publishing LTD.

Mishkal Publishing & Distribution LTD received the rights for both books in 2010, in a deal between Shonia, Astrologue and Mishkal dated 03/02/2010 [I am writing the date in numeric form as it may portend something – MF]. Ron sued Shonia, Astrologue and Mishkal in the Tel Aviv District Court in Appeal 8822/15, and counter Appeal 8822/15. [No doubt these file numbers have some mystical significance-MF].

On 20 March 2004 and on 3 February 2010, Shonia signed declarations Read the rest of this entry »


 Appeal Regarding Infanti Baby Seats Virtually identical to those of Fisher Price (Mattel)

September 19, 2017

fisher price swing seatBaby swing-seats that were made in China and are identical to Fisher Price swing seats, down to the image of a lion on the upholstery, were imported and sold in Israel under the brand Infanti. Fisher Price obtained an Anton Pillar injunction and seized 1830 seats from the Importers’ warehouse. However, the Nazareth District Court rejected all attempts to obtain compensation under copyright infringement of the lion design printed on the seat upholstery and in the instruction manual, trademark infringement for the Fisher Price logo shown in the illustrations of the instruction manual, the trade tort of Passing Off, and the catch-all Law Of Unjust Enrichment following A.Sh.I.R. The case was then referred to the High Court.

This ruling by a panel of Israel High Court judges considers whether copyright subsists for a product design or artwork printed on a product where no design was registered for the product and whether there are grounds for sanctions under the trade-law of Passing Off or under the Law of Unjust Enrichment. The legal advisor to the government filed an amicus brief clarifying the position of the government in such issues.

judge elyakim rubinstenThe main ruling was given by Vice President of the High Court, Judge Elyakim Rubinstein who first considered the basic relationship between design law and copyright. Then, he ruled whether part of something that could have been registered as a design is entitled to copyright protection, and if so, whether the lion character is copyright protected even if the swing chair could have been registered as a design. Are the respondents direct or indirect infringers of the Appellant’s copyright? Do they have the defense of being unaware? Does trademark infringement require intent? And finally is there Passing Off or Unjust Enrichment?

Essentially Judge Rubinstein and Fogelman found copyright infringement due to the lion character on the upholstery, and Judge Meltzer also found that there was passing off, due to the products being virtually identical. Judges Rubinstein and Fogelman rejected the claims of passing off since although Fisher Price clearly had a reputation, they did not necessarily have a reputation for the baby swing seat. Infanti’s copies, though virtually identical to those of Fisher Price, were packaged in different boxes and the boxes were clearly labelled Infanti. The product itself was also labeled with the Infanti brand.

The main ruling is given below, followed by additional comments by Judges Fogelman and Meltzer. Since this is an important ruling, I have translated it in full. At the end are some comments and criticisms.

Background

This is an appeal against ruling 39534-02-15 by Nazareth district Court judge, Ben Chamo which was given on 8 January 2015 and in which Fisher Price lost their claim regarding copyright infringement in a child’s swing seat.

The ruling addresses the relationship between copyright and registered design rights. Judge Rubinstein notes that in the modern consumer society, the design of consumer goods has an increasing importance, and that manufacturers invest heavily  Consequently, many goods are some combination of functionality and artistic expression which makes it difficult to classify such goods in a single IP category and raises difficult legal questions. This appeal relates to a list of such questions of which the relationship between design law and copyright is central.

The Appellant, Mattel Inc. is a US Company that owns Fisher Price which makes baby goods, etc. The Respondent, Dvaron Import-Export Co. Ltd, is a company that imports various baby products into Israel. They and their directors and share holders were sued.

infantiMattel / Fisher-Price learned through Sakal which imports their products into Israel, that the respondents have been distributing a baby swing seat manufactured in China and branded as Infanti, which is a copy of the Fisher-Price swing seat.  Read the rest of this entry »


Israel Court Recognizes Copyright and Moral Rights in the Format of a TV Show

April 25, 2017

Background

Copyright protection is available for films, TV programs and other creative endeavors. The problem with TV formats is that ideas and concepts are not protected. The embodiment of the idea is, but a format that is ‘copied’ abroad will inevitably be re-shot and the content will change. A game show is scripted by its players. A quiz could conceivably have the same questions in different jurisdictions but the participants will answer differently. Much of the viewability of a TV program is related to the characters of the participants themselves. Different competitors in a song competition will sing differently. In a cookery program, the participants will cook differently. Different people look and act differently in game-show survival situations.

Until this ruling, it was not clear that formats of TV shows are copyright protected. The fact that they are bought and sold does not mean a court would recognize a rip-off program as being copyright infringing.

Upgrade

Armoza Productions Israel makes formats of TV programs that are successful abroad. Saar Brodsky and two partners created a format called “Upgrade” that was not successful in Israel, but which Armoza Productions managed to market abroad in 30 countries. In a groundbreaking ruling, the Israel District Court recognized copyright as subsiding in the format and thus ruled that the creators’ moral and financial copyright was infringed. It will be noted that the court could have ruled damages under the catch all tort of Unjust Enrichment.

Upgrade is a game show that goes into people’s homes and offers them a chance to upgrade their personal items for brand new ones! Each home can wager their belongings against their trivia skills. If they answer correctly, their homes will be upgraded… but there’s a catch! Wrong answers mean the items they own will be taken away. Are you ready to be left without a dishwasher, TV, or bedroom set?

In each episode the ‘Upgrade’ team will enter 2 households and play the game with them. It can be with a group of young bachelors or a big family in the middle of having their dinner – but no matter what, it is always by surprise and unexpected. Now on air in over 15 territories!

A link to the format that was posted on YouTube may be found here.

Saar Brodsky, Rodrigo Gonzales and Gili Golan created the format in 2008 and made a pilot episode for Israel’s Channel 10 that was eventually scrapped without being broadcast.

The ‘rights’ to the format were sold to ‘Tanin Productions’ which is owned by Golan (Tanin is a crocodile) and these were then transferred to Armoza Productions with a request that the three creators be credited with the concept.

Brodsky claimed that despite the significant worldwide success of the format his name was deleted from the credits in an attempt to prevent him benefiting from the copyright and profits. Judge Avnieli ruled that Armoza acted intentionally in bad faith despite knowing about his contribution to the format. Since Armoza Productions is a limited company with a single owner, the owner is personally responsible in this instance.

Judge Avnieli noted that Armoza claimed that Brodsky merely thought up the idea and discussed it with friends and did nothing to develop it further. She rejects this defense. The entertainment is the result of work by Brodsky, Gonzales and Golan which was embodied in a storyboard and presentation that was prepared for the filming of the pilot program, that was the result of deep contemplation regarding the details, the structure of the episodes, directions to the actors, choice of competitors, preparation of questions, activities and anchors that resulted in the specific end product.

The Judge noted that under cross-examination Armoza was asked to identify the creators of the format and whether the plaintiff was one of them, and Armoza’s response was that they didn’t know and that it wasn’t relevant. This was not compatible with the evidence submitted that clearly showed that Brodsky was the producer of the pilot. Judge Avnieli considers that each time Armoza claimed to be the creators of the format without attributing Brodsky and his partners, they were infringing Brodsksy’s moral rights. The Judge ruled that Brodsky and partners should be credited in each episode, that Armoza should refrain from describing themselves as the creators and fined Armoza 30,000 Shekels in legal expenses.  There is a parallel ongoing case for financial damages of 1.5 million shekels.

Armoza have vowed to appeal the decision.

COMMENT

It is almost embarrassing that Israel is developing a reputation for such programs.


Copyright in Multiple Choice Test Questions

January 20, 2017

multiple-choice-2In Israel, to obtain a driving license, the wannabee driver has to pass both theory and practice exams and then to drive with an experienced driver riding shot-gun.

Periodically, drivers have to do refresher courses, even if they don’t have points on their license for traffic offences.

The system is far from perfect in that annually there are plenty of traffic offences and people killed in traffic accidents. Israel is a Mediterranean country and this affects the attitude of drivers, but I digress.

Borsy is a Publishing House that has a monopolistic license from the government to generate and distribute driving theory multiple choice questions.

Derekh (Way) has a website that teaches driving theory.

multiple-choice-1

Borsy sued Derekh for copyright infringement claiming that it publicized multiple choice questions (known in Israel as American testing) cribbed from Borsy.

A magistrate’s court ruled that Derekh did indeed copy multiple choice questions, sometimes with minor changes in wording, or use of synonyms. It rejected a defense offered by Derekh that they were operating under an agreement with Borsy, and ordered Derekh to pay Borsy 85000 Shekels in compensation.

Comment

  • A few years ago, the Israel Supreme Court overturned a ruling for copyright infringement in grammar text bookscopyright infringement in grammar textbooks.  Frankly, I am not a great fan of either unique government licenses to make up tests of this nature, or to extend copyright to include synonyms and minor changes of wording.  There are a limited number of multiple choice questions that can be based on the highway code. Reproducing road signs may itself be copyright infringement. However, the real question is one of policy. Do we want monopolies in this area?

LES Event on Copyright for Software

January 17, 2017
Inline image
INVITATION TO A LES ISRAEL EVENT
LES Israel is hosting an event on Monday,January 30th, 2017, at IBM Israel Ltd., 94 Derech Em-Hamoshavot Petach-Tikva, at 09:00am.
 
The event will be dedicated to the topic “Rights in Software”
 
The topic will be presented, as follows:
 
Part A: Lectures
  • Ziv Glazberg, Patent Attorney and Advocate (Ziv Glazberg), a Partner atG&A Glazberg, Applebaum & Co., a law and patent firm, will speak on “Patent Protection for Software”;
  • Eran Bareket, Advocate (Eran Bareket), a Senior Partner at Gilat, Bareket & Co. of the Reinhold Cohn Group, a law and patent firm, will speak on “Copyright for Software – Protection and Exceptions”; 
  • Haim Ravia, Advocate (Haim Ravia), a Senior Partner, Chair of the Internet, Cyber & Copyright Group at Pearl Cohen Zedek Latzer Baratz, a law and patent firm, will speak on “Alternative Use of Copyrights in Software and Digital Content”
Part B: Panel
 
Moderator: Suzanne Erez, Patent Attorney and Advocate(Suzanne Erez), IPLaw Counsel, EMEA IPLaw – Israel, Research, IBM;
 
o   Einav Zilber, Patent Attorney and Advocate (Einav Zilber), Director, Global Law Department, Intellectual Property Counsel, Applied Materials Israel and Applied Materials India;
o   Yoav Alkalay, Patent Attorney and Advocate (Yoav Alkalay), Head of IP, Amdocs;
o   Ben Haklai, Advocate (Ben Haklai), Commercial (Legal) Lead, Microsoft Israel;
o   Hananel Kvatinsky, Patent Attorney (Hananel Kvatinsky), Director of Intellectual Property, Orbotech Ltd.;
o   Ori Buberman, Advocate (Ori Buberman), Head of Intellectual Property, Mobileye Ltd.;
 
The event is free to LES Israel members.
Non-members: NIS 50 charge.
 
Registration is by email to les_israel@yahoo.com.
 

Alternative Dispute Resolution Copyright in an Ark Curtain

January 9, 2017

parochet cloth.JPG

Haggit Weingarten is a talented graphic designer. She designed a parochet (curtain for ornamenting the Ark of the Synagogue) where she and her family pray in Petach Tikveh. After finalizing the design with the Synagogue, Ms Weingarten approached a company that did computerized embroidery that specializes in similar ritual items and paid them to fabricate a parochet with her design which is a stylized arrangement of a well known phrase found in Isiah 52:8. The curtain is more modern that the dark velvet or satin curtains that include Stars of David, lions, the Menorah or Ten Commandments that are ultra conservative, but it is not overly modern. The resultant curtain is shown alongside having in her Synagogue. The embroidery company were very complimentary of her design.

parochet-laviSome months later, a member of her community spent a weekend in a Kibbutz Hotel and was surprised to see a curtain with the identical design hanging in the Synagogue of the hotel. Ms Weingarten was rather annoyed about this, and after a little bit of research discovered that the embroidery company was offering the curtain in their catalogue of designs and on their website. Now furious, she got her attorney-in-law husband to write a cease and desist letter requiring that the design be removed from the catalogue and from the website and that the company pay 5000 Shekels compensation.

The company argued that graphic designers made nowhere near that amount for designing embroidery and made a counter-offer of a velvet bag for the husband to store his ritual prayer shawl in.

Dr Ben Spungin who is a patent attorney at IP Factor, prays in the same Syngagogue. The Weingartens contacted him and we decided to help. I was near the Kibbutz one day that summer and took a photograph of the curtain, which by that stage was a three piece suite set including  a cover for the Bima – the central table used for reading from the Torah, and a smaller cloth for the lectern.

The problem was that court proceedings could take 2-3 years and the total award would be unlikely to cover the legal costs which was why the embroidery company could take such a cavalier attitude to their infringement.

We prepared a Statement of Case and noted that under copyright law, the graphic artist was entitled to (up to) 100,000 Shekels compensation for copyright infringement, and a further 100,000 Shekels for infringement of her moral rights to be identified as the artist. In case the embroiderers would argue that this was a design for manufacture and not a work of art, we noted that under the A.Sh.I.R. ruling, the artist was entitled to up to 100,000 Shekels compensation under the Law of Unjust Enrichment.

We sent a copy of the Statement of Case to the embroiderers. Their lawyer got the embroidery company to take the curtain off their website and out of their catalogue, and  then contacted us to negotiate a settlement.

Now whilst the law provides grounds to sue for up to 200,000 Shekels, followers of this blog will note that court rulings vary widely from 2000 Shekels to maybe 50,000 Shekels for copyright infringement of this nature. Ms Weingarten did not include her name as the designer on the original curtain for her Synagogue. Nor would she be expected to. Arguably however, this puts a zero value on her moral rights to be recognized as the artist. More significantly, the original Cease & Desist letter from her husband valued the infringement at 5000 Shekels. Still, the curtain had now gone forth and multiplied into a family of three embroidered cloths. With both lawyers phoning their clients and a little haggling, a settlement was agreed that was more than the Weingartens had originally asked for and even after paying us a small commission, was still more than they would have received.  Justice was served in that the embroiderers ended up paying more than they would have otherwise, not including their own legal expenses. The issue was settled in less than three months.

It should be appreciated that mediation and arbitration are faster alternatives to court proceedings. As this was not a court ruling in the public domain I am not naming the infringing company, but in court rulings, the parties are identified. To avoid adverse publicity it is often in the parties’ interest to avoid going to court.