Chipsico – a Competing Marks Proceeding Where Both Marks were Refused

July 11, 2017

267474On 13 August 2014, the New Dubak Natsha ltd filed Israel trademark application no. 267474 in class 29 for chips (potato crisps). The stylized mark is shown alongside, and reads CHIPSICO Batates Modalaah – (Chipsico Crinkle-Cut Potato Chips).

The same day, the Halawani Industrial Company ltd filed two trademark applications for coffee, tea, cocoa, sugar, rice, tapioca, sago, coffee substitute, flour and grain products, bread, wafers, cakes and sweets, honey, treacle, yeast, baking powder, salt, mustard, pepper, vinegar, tomato paste, seasoning mixtures, spices, frozen foods, snacks and crackers. The first application was Israel Trademark No. 267770 CHIPSICO and the second, 267772 was for شيبسيكو, which is Chipsico written in Arabic.

crinkle cutThe trademark department considered the marks as being confusingly similar and the parties failed to reach an agreement, so on 8 May 2016, a competing marks proceeding under Section 29 of the Ordinance was initiated and the parties were invited to present their evidence.

New Dubak Natsha ltd submitted: Read the rest of this entry »


Dilution of a Beverage Mark?

June 14, 2017

267280CT Miami LLC applied to register Israel Trademark Application No. 267280 in classes 9 and 38. The mark in question  is shown alongside.

On 1o May 2016, the mark was allowed and it published for opposition purposes on 31 May 2016. Perhaps not surprisingly,  Blu Israel Drinks ltd opposed the mark under Section 24a of the Trademark Ordinance 1972 and Section 35 of the Trademark Regulations 1940.

blu(Blu Israel drinks makes an energy boosting caffeine supplement drink).

On 9 October 2016, the Applicants requested an extension of time until 9 December 2016, for submitting their Counter-Statement of Claims, but did not actually submit a Counter Statement of Claims by then, or indeed prior to this decision issuing.

In these circumstances, the Applicant may be considered as having abandoned their mark and thus  Adjudicator Ms Shoshani Caspi ruled that the file be closed. Furthermore, applying her discretionary authority under section 69, she ruled reasonable damages for having to manage the Opposition. After weighing up the different considerations, she ruled  that the Applicants should pay 3500 Shekels exc. VAT within 14 days.


Israel Supreme Court Rejects Appeal from Shukha Trademark Infringers

June 9, 2017

shukhaThere are two branches of the Shukha family that market oil and other food stuffs: Sons of George Shukha ltd. and Antoine Shukha and Sons ltd.

Sons of George Shukha ltd, which also imports and distributes rice, have 27 registered trademarks including the name Shukra in English, Hebrew and Arabic.  The earliest registered mark is from 1984 but one mark is for Sons of George Shukra from 1930.

Over a six-year period, the Sons of George Shukha ltd attempted to enforce their marks through the courts with the parties reaching an agreement that allowed Antoine Shukra and Sons to use labels that include the name Shukra in a font size no larger than that for Antoine and Sons and together with a logo. The settlement, though ratified by the court, was not fulfilled and so Sons of George Shukha ltd. appealed to the Supreme Court. Antoine Shukra and Sons submitted various creative arguments arguing that since the size of their oil containers was larger, the agreed size of the label was no longer reasonable. They also claimed that the ruling only related to the name Shukra in Arabic. They submitted that two weeks to recall and remove all infringing products from the shelves was too short a period, and the penalty of 2500 Shekels for every day delay would cripple them.

Supreme Court Judge Amit pointed out that unless the penalty for failing to enforce was crippling, infringing parties would simply continue to prevaricate. He noted that in two of the three counts of continued infringement, Antoine Shukra and Sons acknowledged that they were infringing, and in the third case, where the issues that received court endorsement related to the size used for the name Shukra and to it being used together with a logo, even if there was some grounds to consider the Appeal based on font size, the infringers were not displaying the logo prominently. He refused to reconsider issues ruled on by District Judge but noted that the District Court judge had stated that the Appellants had made various claims in affidavits but withdrew them during the hearing, and had generally acted in bad faith.

Judge Amit noted that with financial penalties for failing to enforce, staying a ruling during Appeal was generally not appropriate since a monetary ruling could rectify any issues. Judge Amit refused to stay the enforcement, but granted a 30 days instead of 14 days for it to be enforced.  By the end of this period, the Appellants have to provide a full record od what was done to recall or relabel the infringing goods. Costs of 5000 Shekels were awarded to Sons of George Shukha ltd.

Appeal 4113/17 Sone of George Shukra ltd. vs. Antoine Shukra and Sons ltd. and various members of the Shukra clan and related companies. 8 June 2017


Costs Award for Drink Point Competing Marks Proceeding

June 9, 2017

Where two parties file confusingly similar or identical trademark applications in Israel, such that both are co-pending, a competing marks proceeding ensues under Section 29 of the Trademark Ordinance 1972. More important that who filed first, are the issues of inequitable behavior and the scope of use.

On 20 May 2012 Assaf Nakdai and Benny Molayof submitted Israel trademark application no. 246704 for DRINK POINT covering business management and business administration; office functions; advertisements; sales promotion; sale of alcoholic beverages; included in class 35.

On the same day Drink Point LTD submitted the identical mark for services for providing food and drink; all included in class 43

250525Then on 9 October 2017, Drink Point LTD submitted an application for the same mark for business management, advertisements and sales promotion (including sale of alcohol); all included in class 35 and on 23 October 2017 Drink Point LTD submitted an application for the stylized mark shown alongside.

On 8 March 2017 Assaf Nakdai and Benny Molayof withdrew their application following a ruling by Judge Cochava Levy of the Tel Aviv – Jaffa Magistrate’s Court. Consequently on 12 March 2017, the Deputy Commissioner terminated the competing marks proceeding and allowed Drink Point’s applications to proceed to examination.

Drink Point LTD requested 14,200 Shekels in costs, alleging inequitable behavior and costs incurred in the corresponding court proceeding.

Ruling

In the ruling, the Deputy Commissioner reiterated the principle that the winning party were entitled to recoup their actual costs. However, she could only consider costs incurred in the competing marks proceeding, not those relating to the court ruling which should be addressed to that court. Furthermore, she was not convinced that Nakdai and Molayof had acted inequitably. The invoices submitted for Drink Point ltd’s lawyer’s fees were not sufficiently detailed to be considered. Therefore, she estimated an appropriate fee for the amount of work performed and ruled 7000 Shekels costs.


3D Vision – virtual-reality reality

June 8, 2017

3dvision3DVision LTD submitted Israel trademark application no. 273325 for “3DVISION” on 25 March 2015. The mark covers Services of design, construction, building and designing websites; design and development services, namely, development services of technological solutions, software development services, web hosting services and content management services, visual communication design, graphic design services; graphic and architectural simulations design services using computer software; computer services, namely, design services and development services of three-dimensional movies, pictures, motion pictures with sound, audio and visual aids; Creative services, namely, design and development of computer software and consulting services related thereto; design of animated websites; design services of websites for marketing and advertising purposes; design services of graphic illustration services for others; design services of customized multimedia products for educational, marketing, training, demonstrational, presentation, architectural, engineering and development purposes; design services of multimedia products in the form of applications of computer graphics and website hosting services for the exchange of graphics, images, text, computer simulations, architectural simulations, marketing and promotional videos between the parties, all in class 42 .

The trademark department considered the mark as indicating three-dimensional perception and lacking distinctiveness for the relevant goods and services. Since other service providers used the term as well, they refused it under Section 8(a) of the Israel Trademark Ordinance 1972, and also considered it as contravening section 11(10) as being descriptive. Although the mark was filed in a specific font, the Examiner considered the san serif font as not having the minimal styling to render the mark registerable.

Furthermore, the mark was considered confusingly similar to Israel trademark number 191734 for D-Vision in class 34, but that mark lapsed on 30 January 2017 due to non-payment of the renewal fee.

On 28 December 2015 the Applicant argued that the mark had acquired distinctiveness through usage and was associated exclusively with the Applicant and thus was registerable under Section 8b of the Ordinance. The Applicant argued that the mark has been in use for 13 years and the public was exposed to it in various media including via the Internet. The Applicant also noted that since 2003 they had been using the identical Internet domain (not stylized) and had similar pages and channels in various social media including Facebook and YouTube for over five years. This exposure, continued usage and marketing investment had resulted in the mark being well-known for virtual reality and animation in the real estate business [MF – Virtual Reality Reality?]. An affidavit by the CEO was submitted to support these claims. Read the rest of this entry »


White Beer brewed by Different Monks Not Confusingly Similar

June 7, 2017

benediktineThe Bitburger Braugruppe GmbH applied for Israel Trademark No. 270167 for beer and non-alcoholic beverages in classes 32 and for education and catering services in class 43. The mark includes the words Benediktiner Weissbier and a picture of a Benedictine monk.

FranciscanBefore the mark was examined, Spaten-Franziskaner-Bräu GmbH applied for Israel Trademark No. 273567 for beer and non-alcoholic beverages in classes 32. The mark includes the words Franziskaner Weissbier and a picture of a Franciscan monk.

The Israel Trademark Department considered the marks as being confusingly similar and instituted a competing marks proceeding under Section 29 of the Trademark Ordinance.

Both sides presented their evidence as to who should prevail, but before a date was fixed for a hearing, they hammered out a coexistence agreement and agreed on steps to be taken to minimize the likelihood of the public being confused.

The Deputy Commissioner, Ms Jacqueline Bracha considered that the agreement was acceptable and the two trademarks could coexist.

The Benedictine beer (not to be confused with the liqueur that was a favorite tipple of the last Lubavicher Rebbe) is brewed in a brewery founded in 1609 and has a special recipe used by the monks. Since introduced into Israel in 2012, six million shekels has been spent on advertising and hundreds of thousands of liters were sold each year.

The Franciscan brewery claims to date back to the 14th century and that its label was designed in Munich in 1935. They have a registered trademark in Israel from 1936, and the applied for trademark has been used since 2008 for hundreds of thousands of liters.

Section 30 of the Trademark Ordinance allows for coexistence of marks for the same or similar goods where the Commissioner considers that marks are applied for in good faith.  Since the marks have coexisted for five years in Israel (and are known worldwide) and there is no grounds to conclude that one side or the other is trying to benefit from the competitor’s reputation.

The names sound very different when pronounced and the images of the monks are well established for beers.

The Deputy Commissioner then related to dove cosmetics and to the biosensor ruling and concluded that there was no likelihood of confusion.

Coexistence of the two marks is allowed.

COMMENT

This is a little like the joke about the Jew who was beaten up for sinking the Titanic… iceberg, Goldberg, what’s the difference?

Anyone with any sensitivity to monk habits would easily differentiate between Benediktine and Franciscan monks. Benedictine, being black friars would not be seen dead in brown habits. Franciscans, eschewing wealth, wear habits of peasant fabric, and being capucians, have distinctive hoods on their habits.

Perhaps more significantly, images of barley are generic for beer, and the term weissbier just means pale ale, or lager. Since beer has been brewed by monks for centuries, the image of a monk or someone holding a tankard is hardly distinctive. Even the most inebriated would realize that all the above simply indicate beer, and the it is specifically the terms Franziskaner and Benediktiner that indicate the flavour. Those unable to tell the difference would probably not care what they are drinking anyway.

Because of shipping costs, improrted beer from Germany is relatively expensive and these beers are considered as premium brands. the volume of sales is similar in each case and though adequate to demonstrate that they are established locally, their combined market sector is only a small fraction of beer sales. The Arab population does not drink beer at all, and those willing and able to purchase these lagers are generally well educated and discerning. Coexistence is a reasonable outcome in the circumstances. Furthermore, since the parties proposed coexistence, it is unlikely that anyone will appeal this decision.

 

 


Aluminium Profile Trademark Ruling Survives Appeal to Supreme Court

June 7, 2017

On 16th November, we reported that the District Court has upheld Deputy Commissioner Ms Bracha’s Decision not to allow registration of Israel trademark application 240319 filed by AL-SHURKAH ALWATANEYA LISENAET AL-ALAMENYOM WALPROFILAT (National Aluminum & Profile Co or NAPCO) following an opposition proceeding by  Extal LTD.

240139

Not content, NAPCO appealed to the Supreme Court and Extal filed a counter-appeal.

Judge Meni Mazuz has upheld the ruling and Appeal. He does not consider the issue of general public interest.

NAPCO lost their mark for failure to pay the renewal fee. Judge Mazuz does not consider that a now non-registered mark has to be a well-known mark to prevent registration of a confusingly similar mark, and that Deputy Commissioner Bracha was acting within her discretion in her ruling to not allow the mark to be registered.

Judge Mazuz did not consider that any fundamental rights were lost by requiring a different extrusion marking to be applied to profiles.