November 8, 2017


LES Israel and IPAA invite you to an event on Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 09:00-
12:30 at ZOA House (אמריקה ציוני בית ,(26 Ibn Gabirol St. (corner of Daniel Frisch St.), Tel
Aviv (The presentations will start at 9:30).
The event will be dedicated to the topic:
Patent Term Extension Peculiarities
Israel and Europe
The topic will be presented by distinguished speakers, as follows:
 Mr. Liad Whatstein (Liad Whatstein, Adv.), Founding Partner of the Israeli law firm Liad
Whatstein & Co.:
Patent Term Extensions under Israeli law – The Eccentricities of The Local System
 Mr. Tjibbe Douma (Tjibbe Douma, Adv.), Senior Associate at the law firm of De Brauw
Blackstone Westbroek NV, The Netherlands; and
Ms. Tessa Malamud-Cohen (Tessa Malamud-Cohen, European and Israeli Patent Attorney),
Director, Patents, Global Intellectual Property of Ferring Pharmaceuticals/Bio-Technology
General (Israel) Ltd.:

SPC Squatting: SPCs Based on Third Party Marketing Authorization
 Mr. Tal Band (Tal Band, Adv.), Head of the IP Practice Group in the Israeli law
firm S. Horowitz & Co.:
Patent Term Extensions in Israel – When is it “Game Over”?

We will allocate some time at the end of the event for discussion and welcome comments
from the audience.
The event is free to LES Israel and IPAA members.
Non-members: NIS 70 charge.

Kindly confirm your participation by return email to les_israel@yahoo.com.

COMMENTS

The speakers are considered distinguished by IPAA and LES. I’ve cut and pasted their notification verbatim. I do not disagree, but merely wish to note, that the adjective is not one I chose. The speaker list is balanced in that Tal represents TEVA who usually are generics opposing patent term extensions (although recently trying to reinvent Copaxone to keep it evergreen). Liad works for the patent developers who try to obtain patent term extensions, and Tessa works in-house in the industry. I do not remember meeting Mr. Tjibbe Douma and suspect with a name like that, I would.

counting-sheepMy extensive practice has not involved patent term extensions since I split with Jeremy Ben-David, whose father, Dr Stanley Davis, drafted the Neurim patents for Circadin, whose UK Patent Term Extension went to the European Court of Justice, see here, here, here, etc, so the event has little interest to me personally, although is clearly important for the pharma crowd. Perhaps we should let sleeping sheep lie.


An Attempt to Cancel Patent For Breaking GSM Standard Algorithm

September 27, 2017

GSM logoDr Elad Barkan invented or discovered a cryptology method for breaking GSM coded communications and filed a patent application on 30 April 2003 titled “Cryptanalysis Method and System”, which was awarded Israel Patent No. IL 155671 in June 2005. The method was based on the discovery of a fundamental coding flaw in the GSM protocol which caused quite a stir among both telecommunication experts and the cryptology community.

DiscoveryOn 23 June 2015, Rontal Engineering Applications 2001 Ltd applied to have the patent cancelled on various grounds including that it was a discovery and not an invention; that the supplementary tests of inventiveness were met so that there was no inventive step, and that the patent was never implemented. In a long and detailed decision, Deputy Commissioner Ms Jacqueline Bracha considered the various allegations and ruled on the validity of the patent registration.

After the statements of case and the evidence were submitted, a three-day hearing was scheduled in December 2016, and the parties then submitted written summations.

Complicating matters, during the summation stage, the Opposer, Rontal Engineering Applications 2000 Ltd, filed for bankruptcy. Dr Barkan submitted a request that Rontal Engineering post a bond for 200,000 Shekels, to pay his legal fees should he prevail against them. The Deputy Commissioner agreed with his request and a bond was posted duly on 15 July 2017.

Somewhat unusually, the ruling starts with a list of definitions of various words relating to the GSM protocol. Then the decision goes on to rule if the invention relates to patentable subject matter.  In a 46 page ruling with 165 paragraphs, the Deputy Commissioner found that the invention is patentable per se. Furthermore, the invention described is substantially different to the closest prior art so the patent was upheld.

In my conclusions at the end of this article, I conclude that the Opposers could probably have successfully obtained their real objective by negotiating a claim restriction to exclude brute force attacks which were never intended to be covered by the claims anyway.

A summary of the Decision follows.

Glossary

The patent relates to GSM encryption, and to understand the case, a number of terms need to be defined.

GSM NETWORKGSM is an acronym for Global System for Mobile Communications. It is a standard for cellular phone networks developed in 1987 and available since 1992. The standard was published before the priority date. The standard is a digital telecommunication standard and voice is digitized, transmitted and then converted back into sound. GSM is encrypted to prevent third parties from eavesdropping. The communication takes place via base stations.

Read the rest of this entry »


Exams for Wannabee Israel Patent Attorneys

September 13, 2017

The Israel Patent Office has announced the dates of the qualification exams for Israel Patent Attorneys.

Oral Bagrut PicUnless given a dispensation from one, the other, or both, each candidate has to pass a written exam that tests calligraphy and scribal errors patent drafting skills and langauge skills, and an oral exam that tests dental hygiene knowledge of IP Law, particularly but not exclusively, Israeli law.

exam paperThere are two sessions for the written exams. Those wishing to take an examination relating to computer, mechanical or electronic technologies are invited to come on Monday 27 of November 2017. Those wishing to try their hand at biology or chemistry are invited to come on Tuesday 28 November 2017.

The oral exams will be held on 20th and 21st November and candidates will be assigned specific times on registration.

The deadline for registering is one month in advance.


Filing Baseless Patent Infringement Complaints in the US Can be Expensive

August 30, 2017

Octane fitnessIcon Health and Fitness sued Octane Fitness for patent infringement in 2009, saying that Octane’s high-end elliptical machines infringed US Patent No. 6,019,710, which describes an elliptical machine that allows for adjustments to accommodate individual strides. After two years of litigation, a district court judge found that Octane’s machines didn’t infringe. Octane asked for an award of legal fees, but in 2011, a judge rejected the company’s bid. That decision was upheld on appeal.

It is very rare for US courts to rule costs. This has resulted in the so-called patent troll phenomenon, wherein companies sue for patent infringement on very shaky grounds assuming that they have little to lose.

In this instance, Octane Fitness appealed to the Supreme Court, which heard oral arguments on the case in 2014. In 9-0 vote, the court issued an opinion (PDF) making it much easier to get attorney’s fees. Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote the opinion, holding that patent laws call for awarding fees in an “exceptional” case, which is “simply one that stands out from others with respect to the substantive strength of a party’s litigating position… or the unreasonable manner in which the case was litigated.”

With that, the case was kicked back down to the lower courts. Under the new standard, the district court judge awarded $1.6 million to Octane over the objections of Icon lawyers.

On Friday, the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit upheld (PDF) that award in its entirety. The district court found that Icon’s claim construction arguments were “wholly at odds with the patent text, prosecution history, and inventor testimony,” The court also found that Icon included Nellie’s Fitness, an equipment distributor, as a defendant for the purpose increasing Octane’s legal costs.

The appeals judges found “no clear error in its analysis” and upheld the district court’s award. The panel dismissed a cross-appeal by Octane asking for a larger award, which would also cover litigation over the fees.

COMMENT

trollThe case is reminiscent of a frivolous law suit brought by Pearl Cohen on behalf of Vagabond Source, where the courts ruled that Source’s counsel (i.e. Pearl Cohen Zedek Latzer pay $187,308.65 in partial attorney’s fees, but that Source not be sanctioned. Pearl Cohen appealed that ruling, and lost again in the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals.

We think that such cost rulings are in order to prevent abuse of the system.

 


Employee Inventions

August 14, 2017

termination of employment 2Earlier this month, three decisions were published by the tribunal for establishing compensation for employee inventions. The tribunal consists of a judge, the Commissioner and an academic.

The legal basis for the tribunal providing compensation is Section 134 of the Israel Patent Law which states:

In the absence of an agreement that determines whether the inventor is entitled to compensation and what the compensation should be, appropriate compensation will be determined by the Committee for Compensation established under Section VI.

The three decisions follow a Supreme Court Appeal of a decision of this nature  Supreme Court 4353/14 Barzani vs. Isscar Ltd, from 8 July 2015 which makes clear that the committee’s powers are non-cognitive and the parties can come to alternative contractual arrangements. The rulings provide a good indication of how the committee sees its responsibilities, but are censored of details that could reveal the employee or the company but some general guidelines can still be drawn:

  1. If there is an agreement in place, including one for token compensation or for no compensation at all, the committee has no standing.
  2. Registering the application in the name of the company and the inventor filing assignments of the corresponding patent abroad, including for a nominal sum such as one US dollar, is not considered as an agreement and does not disqualify the inventor from receiving compensation from the committee.
  3. Clauses in the employment contract or an NDA signed by the employee whilst a consultant before starting to work on a salary basis, that state that any invention by the employee will be the property of the company do not mean that the committee has no standing and the employee will not be entitled to compensation ruled by the committee.
  4. A termination agreement signed by the employee in which he states that he does not have and will not have any claims against the company is considered a waiver of compensation.
    Unlike labour law where the labour court assumes powers to delete or amend clauses in a contract that contravene standard labour law, the compensation to inventors is dispositive and can be waived. Furthermore, the committee does not have the power to amend agreements. Once it determines that there is an agreement in place, whatever its terms, the committee no longer has any standing.
  5. Union negotiated general contracts are considered binding on the employee.
  6. Efficiency proposals and valuable discoveries are probably not service inventions

The three rulings may be found here, here  and here.

 


A Ruling Concerning Service Invention Compensation by a Worker of a Unionized Industry

August 10, 2017

This is the third decision on employee compensation that issued this month.

In this case, the employee inventor requested that the committee for discussing employee compensation for service inventions rule compensation under Section 134 of the Israel Patent Law. On 22 July 2014, the Company responded by requested three interim rulings:

  1. That the case be thrown out due to the Statute of Limitations.
  2. That the case be thrown out due to tardiness or the employee having given up on receiving compensation
  3. (in absence of above) that the committee set a timetable for the proceeding.

The parties filed responses and further submissions and attended a hearing on 24 December 2015, and the committee decided that the parties should concentrate on the issue of whether or not the committee had standing in this instance.

The Applicant (inventor) submitted his summation on 12 April 2016 and the respondent (company) submitted their summation on 13 December 2016, and a counter response was submitted on 1 March 2017.

The Applicant submitted an affidavit as did Mrs. XXXX (job description not given) and Mr. YYYYY, the head of the patent committee of the respondent.

The facts (censored)

The Applicant started working for the company in 1993 and was employed to_________. In the scope of his duties, he suggested some efficiency improvements and inventions as detailed below.

The company is_____________________.

The applicant detailed eight suggestions that he submitted: Read the rest of this entry »


A second ruling on employee compensation under Section 134

August 8, 2017

This is a second employee invention where the inventor has referred the case to the relevant committee under Section 134 of the Israel Patent Law 1967. The company countered that the case should be thrown out.

Here are the details:

On 25 June 2013, Mr. XXXX, henceforth Ploni (see Ruth 4:1) requested a compensation ruling under Section 134 of the Patent Law for his employee invention, made during his employment at YYYY Ltd, henceforth the company where he worked over the years____________.

On 13 February 2014, the company requested three interim rulings:

  1. That the case be thrown out due to the Statute of Limitations.
  2. That the case be thrown out due to tardiness or the employee having given up on receiving compensation
  3. (in absence of above) that the committee set a timetable for the proceeding.

On 11 March 2014, the Employee Inventor responded to the request for a timetable and on 5 June 2014, requested a timetable himself.

In an interim decision from 15 June 2014 the committee ruled:

After reviewing the documents mentioned above, and also the response of 11 March 2014, the committee with relate to the issue of the employee having apparently given up on compensation in light of the correspondence between the parties. Thus Ploni is given 30 days to respond to the question of giving up of rights within 30 days.

Before a hearing was held, on 4 August 2014, the committee suspended the proceeding pending the Supreme Court’s ruling on Bagatz 4353/14 Barzani vs. Isscar Ltd, regarding the cogent nature of the compensation under section 134.

In that case, the Supreme Court affirmed that the Section 134 compensation was dispositive and on 21 September 2015 the committee ruled that the hearing would focus on whether or not Ploni had given up on rights under Section 134.

Applicant’s claims

Ploni is a mechanic engineer that was employed by the company in the capacity of ___________. The company specializes in ______________.  Ploni claims that during his employment with the company he invented ___________. Ploni considers that he is entitled to compensation for his work in developing the invention which resulted in patent applications in Israel and abroad.

Ploni claims that during his employment, he recognized the need for using ___ with special characteristics_____________. Ploni claims to have taken the initiative of approaching the company to develop these solutions. He claims that he received support and the blessing of the CEO, Mr. YYYYY, and from the head of R&D Mr. ZZZZZZZZ and this resulted in a new research area at the company.

Ploni claims to have developed the _________ with original characteristics_____________ and a patent application was filed on _____________. He claimed that the early development was done at home in his own time, and only later was his boss, WWWW informed.

Ploni claimed that the Company had not developed _________until then, but applied the invention to other areas which were successful. Consequently Ploni claims that due to his development of the invention he is entitled to compensation.

Ploni denies being party to any waiver agreement with the company that relates to his inventions as an employee of the company.

The Company’s Claim

The company claims that Ploni signed a secrecy agreement (NDA) that stated that all inventions would be the sole property of the company. On termination of his employment, Ploni signed a statement to the effect that he had and would not have any monetary claims against the company. Furthermore, Ploni signed assignments of the invention to the company.

Discussion

The legal basis of the committee is defined in Section 134 of the Law as follows:

In the absence of an agreement that determines whether the inventor is entitled to compensation and what the compensation should be, appropriate compensation will be determined by the Committee for Compensation established under Section VI.

The Section opens with the words “in the absence of an agreement…”, thus when there is an agreement for employee compensation, its amount and conditions, the committee does not have authority to relate to the case.

Both parties accept that this was a service invention.

In the Committee ruling concerning Barzani vs. Isscar Ltd from 4 May 2014, which withstood an Appeal to the Supreme Court 4353/14 Barzani vs. Isscar Ltd, from 8 July 2015, it was determined that Section 134 is non-cognitive (dispositive) in that the parties can come to some other arrangement.

“The committee came to the conclusion that Section 134 is not a cogent right and is not employment law that, as socialist rights has special protection. On the face of things, and in line with the wording of the Law, it appears that the committee was correct (the Article states ‘where there is no agreement that sets employee compensation’). That as may be, with the limited right to meddle with committee decisions, the court does not see fit to interfere in this instance.

 The Supreme Court upheld this finding in 4353/14 Barzani vs. Isscar 8 July 2015.

Was there a Waiver of Rights by the Inventor?

Re Barzani ruled that the parties can make their own arrangements regarding compensation, and so the question is whether the contractual employment arrangement agreed to by the parties included or serves as a waiver of inventor compensation.

Prior to commencing employment, on 19 May 1996 Ploni signed a non-compete non-disclosure agreement. Paragraph 7 of this states that:

I hereby declare that all developments, innovations, inventions or improvements of products, materials, machines, equipment processes or manufacturing processes which I will be party to by way of my employment or which I will become aware of through my employment, are the property of the company and I have no rights in them.

We note immediately that as ruled in the Actelis vs. Yishai Ilani rejection of 3 February 2010, this wording is not in and of itself a waiver of section 134 rights.

termination of employment 2At the end of his employment, on 11 November 1999, Ploni signed a further document that was titled “Secrecy Agreement” and  paragraph 4 thereof is written in a similar style to paragraph 7 of the non-compete non-disclosure agreement from 1996:

The end of employment document is titled “Declaration” and states:

I declare in this, that with termination of my employment with the company _______ Ltd, and after being released from obligations to the company _______ Ltd, I am entitled to the social benefits of the workers and the pension rights and deposited by the company and I do not have and will not have any claims for damages or other claims.

In patent applications filed in the US, Canada, UK,  Japan and Hungary, assignments of the patent were made. By way of illustration, in the US, the assignment states:

“in consideration of the sum of One Dollar…we, the said ASSIGNORS, have sold, assigned transferred and set over… unto the ASSIGNEE…our entire right, title and interest in…

The Applicant claims that his signature was forged but the committee does not have the authority to examine such claims.

The Company is relying on three separate documents as the basis of their claim that Ploni has waived his rights:

  1. Engagement terms
  2. End of employment terms
  3. Assignments of the various foreign patent applications

In re Barzani the committee ruled that the end of employment terms are those that should be used to ascertain whether or not there is a waiving of rights:

With respect to the first and third documents we believe, as stated in re Ilani, that these are waiving of rights to the patent in favour of the company and do not constitute a waiver of compensation for the invention. The question of a waiver for compensation is found in the document that relates to the termination of employment. In this regard, it is noted that Ilani did not relate to termination of employment documentation.

Ploni claims that the termination of engagement document relates to rights until that time since the collective work agreements related to freeing of pension funds anyway. However, the committee was not prepared to consider this document as meaningless.

The general nature of the end of engagement document does not exclude service inventions, see re Barzani paragraph 44:

The wording of the end of employment document is clear and unambivalent. The Applicant has no and will not have any claims whatsoever. This wording is general and does not exclude employee inventor rights. The nature of this document is to separate the employee from the company and to terminate all obligations between the parties and that withheld benefits and redundancy payments are released to the worker. This document reflects the joint interest of the parties that there will be no future claims against the employer.

The understanding of the employer regarding what rights are included in the waiving of claims in the termination agreement are not relevant to the current issue. The waiver is a general waiver and is forward looking as discussed in re Barzani:

The committee must consider the intentions of the sides as reflected in the concrete agreements that are before them, and where the parties’ intention was to end their relationship and to prevent future legal issues, their agreement should be recognized. The Applicant claimed that he was unaware of rights under Section 134 of the Patent Law, and so the general waiver cannot include this. This claim is not acceptable. The waiver is general in wording and forward looking “there will not be…” “I will not have…”. So even rights that have not yet materialized, and so there is no specific awareness about them, are considered as included in the general waiver. This includes the right to compensation which is likely to materialize in the future.

This implies that Ploni waived all rights.

 

termination of employmentPloni claims that even if there is a general waiver, it should be voided as being boiler plate text in a standard contract and thus not binding. See Section 3 of the Law of Standard Contracts 1982.

 

 

In re Barzani paragraph 48 it is stated that the committee for compensation and remuneration does not have the right to void individual paragraphs of agreements if there is such an agreement.

In our opinion, the respondent (company) is correct. Although in Rothem vs Teva Medical Ltd 25, July 2005, we ruled that the committee can rule regarding whether it has authority or not, and whether a specific invention is considered an employee service invention, and whether or not there is an agreement regarding compensation. The Court authority found in Section 3 of the Standard Contract Law is not merely declarative, but is constitutive. The court does not consider whether sections of the contract are void or not, but rather actively cancels them or changes them. This committee does not have these powers. As soon as the committee recognizes the existence of an agreement between the parties, its job is done and it is not authorized to interpret or cancel clauses. Furthermore, since Section 134 allows compensation to be rejected there is logic in concluding that section 23(a)2 of the Law of Standard Contracts does apply. See Appeal 825/88 Israel Footballer’s Association vs. The Israel Football Association p.d. 48(5) 89, page 102-103, and paragraph 8(v) of Appeal 1291/03 Shlomo Naomi vs. Mister Mani Ltd, 20 December 2006.

The respondent claims that the statute of limitations applies, but since Ploni is considered as having waived his rights, this is moot.

Under section 134 the committee rules that the Applicant has waived his rights. Considering the relative assets of the parties, each party will bear their own costs.

Ruling by Prof Englehard, Then commissioner Kling and Professor Michael Talinker, 20 April 2017.