IPR or AIPPI???

February 27, 2018

conferencesI was contacted by a trainee patent attorney who wishes to attend one of the forthcoming IP conferences in Israel but is not sure which one is better value for money.  The firm where she works are prepared to recognize her attendance as a day of work rather than a vacation, but are not prepared to pay for her participation.

ipr-logoThe 6th Annual Best Practices in Intellectual Property is hosted by the IPR and will take place on March 12th and 13th 2018.

 

aippi-israelThe Third International Conference on the Economics of Innovation is hosted by the AIPPI on April 30th-May 1st 2018 which may interfere with participation in International Workers’ Day, but I suspect that few IP practitioners in Israel actually march.

(The big international conferences fall over Jewish festivals this year. INTA is in Seattle, USA, but overlaps Shavuot. The AIPPI 2018 World Conference in Cancun, Mexico is over Suckot).

Although I believe that firms taking on trainees should invest in them and both the IPR and AIPPI Israel conferences include sessions that provide excellent training for the bar exams and/or professional development, clearly the cost of such conferences adds up rapidly for large firms if they send all of their staff. I can also appreciate why an IP firm may not want someone not yet qualified appear to represent them, when wandering around a conference and meeting potential clients and associates or actual clients and associates.

apprentice payNevertheless, on the salary of a trainee, particularly one with family commitments, both conferences are costly. A significant number of trainees are new immigrants that are self-not living with their parents. Those unluckily enough to be on a percentage of salary may not earn a minimum wage and I believe their ‘mentors’ should be struck off. But even those earning a reasonable fixed trainee salary may find that laying out 850 Shekels for a day of training lectures, is difficult to justify, despite the high quality lunch and coffee breaks and the possibility to pick up a couple of pieces of swag from exhibitors.

fair priceThis does not mean that either conference is objectively expensive when considering the standard of the program and the costs involved in hosting such events in expensive hotels, the quality of the refreshments and the cost of such programs abroad. However, I can certainly see why someone paying for himself or herself may not be able to justify for both events.

mingling 2Licensed In-House practitioners may well be able to get their companies to pick up the tab for them to attend both conferences, and unless swamped with urgent work, I can see many IP managers preferring to schmooze with colleagues and to attend lectures rather than sitting in their offices.  I suspect the coffee break refreshments and lunches provided also compare well to the canteen food or lunch voucher allowance of most hi-tech companies.

trainingIP boutiques are, of course, able to evaluate the relevance of the training for their different staff members, and will no-doubt consider this when deciding who to send to which conference.

As with all such conferences, some sessions will be highly relevant to one’s day to day work, but perhaps lacking in material one doesn’t already know. Similarly, some sessions will be focused on IP issues that may be completely irrelevant to one’s day to day practice.  In this regard, apart from keynote lectures, both conferences have parallel sessions, and one is advised to carefully select presentations to attend that are at least one of the adjectives selected from the group comprising: relevant, intellectually stimulating and informative.

bpip 2018The Best Practices in Intellectual Property conference hosted by Kim Lindy and the IPR is perhaps mis-named. Apart from one session on trade-secrets, the entire program is dedicated to patents and the conference is very much focused on practical aspects of patent management. The conference is particularly targeted at In-House counsel in industry and has much to interest independent patent attorneys in private practice, partners and attorneys at IP firms. However, it seems to have little of interest to those who earn their living managing trademark or copyright portfolios. Sadly in my opinion, it also does not address design law which is a rapidly changing field in Israel.

jam packedThere will be little at the “Best Practices in Intellectual Property” conference to interest academics. However, the program is jam-packed with relevant sessions for prosecuting patents and managing patent portfolios which is what very many in-house IP managers do, and also is the bread-and-butter work of most patent attorneys in private practice.

variety packThe AIPPI conference titled “The Economics of Innovation” uses the term innovation very widely and is much broader in scope than the “Best Practices in Intellectual Property” conference In that features sessions on trade-secrets, design law, trademarks, Copyright, traditional knowledge, taxation of IP and Internet & Privacy. Many of the sessions look at the issue of overlapping types of protection.

madagascan periwinkle

Madagascan Periwinkle, used to treat Hodgkin’s Disease

One of the AIPPI sessions is titled “Traditional Medicine – the influence of IP on Commercial Use and Economic Aspects”. This is not the first time the topic of traditional knowledge has been covered in Israel. Back in 2011, I helped
Dr Shlomit Yantizky Ravid of ONO Academic College organize a three-day traditional knowledge conference that brought representatives from a large number of developing countries and sympathetic US academics that was sponsored by WIPO.  Dr Irving Treitel, a patent attorney who deals with life science patents, especially pharmaceuticals (who was then working for me at JMB Factor & Co.) responded on behalf of the profession. Prof. Shuba Ghosh was the keynote speaker then, as now. Despite much advertising in the press, only some 30-40 people participated in the conference – virtually all speakers of foreign delegates. Apart from Dr Treitel and myelf, I don’t recall any other IP practitioners attending that free conference. I applaud the AIPPI bringing IP issues to the attention of local practitioners, but I doubt that this session will attract a large attendance despite the prestigious panelists.

 

taxCertainly patent attorneys, whether in-house or in private practice, should be familiar with the different types of protection available to be able to advise or at least refer clients.  Patent Attorneys should also be aware of tax issues, at least broadly, to be able to refer their clients to accountants where appropriate to do so. There are very many large US firms registered in Delaware that conduct R&D in Israel. There are also many firms that are physically based in Israel, but decide to incorporate in the US for political reasons, and these include start-ups as well as larger firms. I have clients that have fairly small staff but are incorporated as an IP holding company that owns the patents, trademarks, copyrights and designs and a separate manufacturing company that licenses the IP assets. The tax issues are not something that a patent attorney deals with, but attorneys-in-law may practice IP and tax law, and in-house legal counsel may deal with IP and taxation.  Apart from understanding how tax issues affect their own income and how various taxes can be legally avoided and what is considered illegal evasion and criminal, I believe that IP professionals not practicing tax law should nevertheless have a general grasp of the tax issues that face their clients to be able to advise them where they should seek guidance from a tax attorney, accountant of tax-consultant.

In summary, both conferences are value for money. People only having the time or budget to attend one should consider which one to go very carefully, and it is worth working out in advance which sessions to attend.


Repeated Requests for Reconsideration Smashed

February 22, 2018

smash batmanBack in May 2017 we reported that Talber Pop LTD owns Israel trademark number 240598 “SMASH” for Notebooks, stationery, diaries, binders; gift wrapping paper, paper gift wrapping bows, paper cake decorations, paper party bags, loot bags, cello bags, paper party decorations, paper party hats, paper tables cloths, paper napkins, banner made of paper and/or cardboards; all included in class 16, and Backpacks, sidepacks, back bags, side bags, sport bags, tote bags, book bags, school bags, food bags, pencil cases sold empty, wallets, waist packs, briefcases, bike bags, toiletry cases sold empty, fanny packs, suitcases, umbrellas, umbrella covers; all included in class 18. They also own a second Israel trademark number 241238 for SMASH in class 14 covering watches, chronometers and their parts, and that Smash Enterprises Pty LTD submitted a request to cancel the Talber Pop LTD marks or to allow their marks to be co-registered.

The parties were interested in coexisting, but MS Shoshani Caspi considered it against the public interest in view of the likelihood of confusion. See here.

Ms Shoshani related to the request, but first detailed the conditions for reconsideration.  The correct way to attack a judicial ruling is by Appealing to a higher court, and not by way of reconsideration. See Appeal 5012/01 Jacobovitz vs. Lerner 11 July 2001 where the following is stated:

Parties that argue and return over again to the court cannot expect an advantage. If the party considers that there was a mistake in the ruling, they should timely file an appeal.

Nevertheless, the case-law allows reconsideration in two instances: where there has been a significant change in circumstances that justifies reconsideration, and where there was a technical error in the ruling. See Appeal 7869/17 E.R.M. Properties vs.Daniel Ohr, 23 November 2017 where Judge Minz of the Supreme Court ruled that:

The rulings of this court recognize two circumstances where a ruling can be reconsidered in a reconsideration, other than interim injunctions which are explicitly legislated in regulation 368 of the Civil Procedure Regulations. The first instance is where there has been a significant change of circumstances, and the second case is where the court made a serious and clear technical error – see Appeal 1474/11 Strauss Marketing vs. Orman, paragraph 13, 14 July 2011; 3604/02 OKO vs Shemi p.d. 56(4) 505, 508 (2002), and Tami bin Nun and Tal Habakin “Civil Appears p. 427 edition 3, 2012.

Over the years there has been a worry that parties would make improper use of the opportunity of interim procedures to request reconsideration (see for example, 8420/96 Margaliyot vs. Mishkan Bank HaPoalim for Mortgages LTD (31 July 1997). So it was established that courts can simply throw out such requests on the grounds of improper use of the court proceedings, particularly where the party requests reconsideration over and over. That written in 5168/01 Reuveni vs. Ben Harush 28 Oct 2001 is relevant here:

RepeatFiling repeat requests that are minor improvements of the original request puts an unreasonable burden on the courts. Requesting reconsideration as a routine event is burdensome, and prevents the court providing a service for all its users.

In re Jakobovitz, then registrar of the Supreme Court Boaz Okan noted that:

The creative multiplication of proceedings, notices, reconsiderations and the like, are symptomatic of loose and unravelling systems (Appeal 502/00 Airport Authority vs. Epkon. There is no place to create cross-species rulings that damage the finality of the Court’s decision and may cause the legal proceedings to drag on forever., by misusing the civil procedures and wasting legal resources.

On 30 December 2015, Smash Enterprises Pty LTD requested to cancel the Talber Pop LTD’s marks for SMASH in classes 16 and 18.

The request for cancellation followed Smash Enterprises Pty LTDs attempt to register SMASH as a trademark in class 21 that was refused under Section 11(9).

Smash Enterprises Pty LTDs  application no 274301 is for Containers for household or kitchen use; household or kitchen utensils; containers for beverages; containers for food; heat insulated containers for beverages; heat retaining containers for food and drink; insulated containers; lunch boxes; isothermic bags; bottles including water bottles (containers); beverage coolers (containers); drinking containers; portable coolers; ice containers; ice packs; plastic containers (household utensils); lids for household or kitchen containers; tableware, including plates, dishes, drinking glasses, bowls, cups, saucers, mugs and jugs, all being of plastic materials; cooking utensils for use with domestic barbecues; storage boxes, baskets and containers for household use; household rubbish containers (bins); glassware for domestic use; ceramic tableware; baking trays; storage jars; cooler bags; thermally insulated bags for food and drink. In class 21.

Talber Pop LTD’s mark 24059 is for Watches of all kinds; chronometers and part thereof and accessories; all included in class 14, for Notebooks, stationery, diaries, binders; gift wrapping paper, paper gift wrapping bows, paper cake decorations, paper party bags, loot bags, cello bags, paper party decorations, paper party hats, paper tables cloths, paper napkins, banner made of paper and/or cardboards; all included in class 16, and for Backpacks, sidepacks, back bags, side bags, sport bags, tote bags, book bags, school bags, food bags, pencil cases sold empty, wallets, waist packs, briefcases, bike bags, toiletry cases sold empty, fanny packs, suitcases, umbrellas, umbrella covers; all included in class 18.

coexistOn 26 January 2017, the parties jointly requested coexistence following a mediation proceeding connected to a civil complaint filed by Smash Enterprises Pty LTD against Talber Pop LTD (Civil Complaint 65168-12-16). The request for coexistence under Section 30 was submitted with a copy of the agreement between the parties.

On 26 April 2017, Ms Shoshani Caspi explained in detail why she considered coexistence to be inappropriate as follows:

Thus the Arbitrator Ms Shoshani Caspi finds herself considering two identical marks for the word SMASH for two different entities that cover inter alia the same goods which creates a strong risk of confusion.

As part of their joint submission. the parties should have provided a detailed explanation why TM 274301 in class 21 should be registerable together with TM 240598 in class 18. This wasn’t done, and the parties have provided no explanation as to how to avoid confusion. The request for coexistence is refused. The parties have until 1 June 2017 to inform whether they wish to conduct a cancellation proceeding.

On 16 October 2017 a first request for reconsideration of the decision of 26 April  was received.  In that framework, the party who had requested cancellation noted that they were abandoning the 274302 and 274158 marks for SMASH in classes 18 and 16, despite the fact that the coexistence agreement didn’t relate to those marks. Additionally, the mark owner noted that they were prepared to strike the term ‘food boxes’ from the list of goods of Israel TM 240598.

On the same day, the Adjudicator Ms Shoshani Caspi again rejected the coexistence agreement stating:

There is before me a request for reconsideration of coexistence of the marks based on the agreement reached by the parties, following my rejecting this possibility in my ruling of 24 April 2017. The parties chose to ignore the significant obstacles that prevent coexistence that were stated in paragraphs 18, 21 and 24 of my previous decision. So the petition is rejected.

On 22 October 2017, the parties again requested reconsideration for a second time, restating their positions and claiming that their agreement does not leave room for confusion between the marks. On 25 October 2017, a detained ruling was issued that again rejected the coexistence stating:

I have not found that an error occurred in my ruling of 26 April 2016 (or indeed of that of 16 October 2017). The parties return and make exactly the same claims a third time. Consequently I do not find that there has been a change in circumstances from those under which the original decision and the appeals were given that justifies further reconsideration. Although unnecessary to do so, I note, again, that we are talking about an attempt to register exactly the same mark for goods having a similar commercial nature, without the appropriate and fitting difference between them. Consequently, the petition[ for coexistence]  is rejected a third time.

nagOn 11 January 2018, the parties submitted a third request for reconsideration of the 25 October 2017 ruling, raising the same arguments. Additionally this time the mark owner requested to remove the term “cases (files) of..”

The Deputy Commissioner does NOT consider this amendment as being a “Significant change in circumstances or a technical error that warrants reconsideration of the ruling of 26 April 2017.

The third request for reconsideration is rejected. The Adjudicator is not happy with attempts to negotiate with the court of the Israel Patent and Trademark Office by unsupported requests for reconsideration. She considers these requests adds to the workload of the patent office staff and requires detailed responses and is inappropriate. She considers it would be appropriate to rule costs against the parties to be paid into the public fund but will refrain from doing so this time.

Ms Shoshani Caspi’s problem is that sports bags and school bags may be in different categories from food storage bags and flasks but the requested mark is for words and school bags and sports bags do sometimes have pockets for food, so she considers that different suppliers cannot use the same word mark for these goods, despite registering in different classes (19 and 21). Indeed, in absence of evidence to the contrary, the goods can be considered as complimentary  goods in the same broad category that are often used together, such that the reasonably consumer will assume a common source. See the HRA Laboratoire Pharma vs. Fr Shapira Eyal ltd ruling of 28 December 2017:

With respect to complimentary goods, one has to consider if there is a tight relationship between them, that one is required or significant to the other, or that the consumer is likely to consider that the provision of the goods is the responsibility of the same supplier.

The parties have still not provided any evidence that undermines the Adjudicator’s conclusions regarding a commercial link between the goods, and have only made unsupported statements to the effect that the food packaging supplied by the requester for cancellation is not sold in the same stores as the bags of the mark owner.

Thus, as determined more than once in this proceeding, the certain similarity between the goods listed in issued mark no. 240598 in section 18 and those in application 274301 in class 21, and the identical nature of the two marks (both word marks for SMASH), leaves a high likelihood of similarity which may result in consumer confusion.

As to the obligation undertaken in the coexistence agreement by the mark owners not to use a stylize graphic rendering of SMASH, this was discussed in the 26 April 2017 ruling, and can simply be recited: “it is difficult to ignore the situation where the patent and trademark registrar allows the parties to make use of the word in any style they see fit, merely because of a narrow contractual agreement between the parties, and the trademark register does not faithfully match the trade situation.”

The parties repetitively made shallow claims that the District Court endorsed the coexistence agreement and gave it the status of a court ruling. Examination of the agreement, sections 3 and 4 thereof, indicate that the mark owner obliged himself not to object to the registration of the word “SMASH” by the requester for cancellation in classes 16 and 18, and the requester for cancellation obligated himself to cancel the requests for cancellation.  It is assumed that the learned legal representatives (Eitan Mehulal for Smash Enterprises and Eyal Plum for Talber Pop) did not intend to accidentally claim that this can be interpreted as the court endorsing the right for the Smash Enterprises mark to be registered, since it is known that the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks has the sole authority to register marks under Section 17(a) of the Ordinance. Thus one has to assume that the court endorsement of the coexistent agreement only obliges the parties themselves.

As we are dealing with the authority of the Israel Patent and Trademark Office, it should be noted that Section 30a allows and does not obligate the commissioner to allow coexistence of identical or confusingly similar marks. Furthermore, in the court ruling 48837-03-14 Biosensors Europe SA  vs the Patent Office 22 February 2015 it was stated that “the burden of proof that there is no confusing similarity is on the companies interested in parallel usage, to show that they have been using the mark in parallel for many years and it has not caused the public to be confused”. For more discussion, see here and here. As stated above, in this instance the parties have not met this burden.

not a rubber stampThus it is ruled that the parties legal representatives (Eitan Mehulal for Smash Enterprises and Eyal Plum for Talber Pop) failed to submit appropriate evidence to support their request for coexistence under Section 30a of the Ordinance, and merely supported their request with the in personam coexistence agreement. The Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks is NOT a rubber-stamp that endorses agreements between warring parties and though allowed to, is not obliged to consider them. The main obligation of the Commissioner is to maintain the integrity of the trademark register and this includes ensuring that there is no likelihood of misleading the public. This forum has established many times that a request for coexistence by the parties does not exert much influence on deciding whether or not to allow such coexistence under section 30a, and is at best an indication that coexistence may be possible that has to be considered with all the considerations, see Supreme Court ruling 1611/07 Micha Danziger cs. Shmuel Mor, 23 August 2012. 

On 3 January 2018, the Adjudicator gave the parties 14 days to submit their evidence, i.e., until 17 January 2018, or the cancellation proceeding would be closed.  The parties have failed to provide such evidence and have also failed to request an extension. The Adjudicator has not ignored the request from the parties to provide guidance for how to restrict the lists of goods to allow coexistence, but she is not clear why this is necessary in light of all the decisions referenced, and does not intend to provide such guidance.

Conclusion – since the Requester for Cancellation has not provided evidence to support his case as asked to, and since no request for extensions of time were submitted, the cancellation proceedings against Israel Trademarks 240598 and 241238 are closed. The Requester for Cancellation is not prevented from filing a new trademark cancellation request if it will be conducted in accordance with the timeframe.

Israel Trademarks 240598 and 241238 “SMASH”, Decision to reject Cancellation Request by Ms Yaara Shoshani Caspi,  18 January 2018.   

 

 


Cobra

August 22, 2017

COBRA.pngKnipex-Werk and C Gustav Putsch KG opposed Israel trademark application nos. 279193 and 283268 in classes class 7 and 8 respectively, which were both filed by Ohev Zion LTD (Ohev Zion, means Love of Zion). The marks are fr the stylized word COBRA shown alongside.

Furthermore, Knipex-Werk and C Gustav Putsch KG themselves filed Israel trademark application no. 289408 in class 8 for the word COBRA, for water pump pliers and pipe wrenches.

On 25 June 2017, the parties submitted a notification to the effect that after long and continuous negotiation, they had reached a coexistence agreement regarding the registration and usage of the marks in Israel, with intent to prevent misleading or confusing Israeli consumers, and the Opposition was thus closed with both parties agreeing to pay their own costs. A copy of the coexistence agreement was appended to the notification.

The parties stated that they were unaware of any actual events of confusion resulted by their usage of the marks in Israel, and that endorsement of the coexistence agreement would protect the public interest, prevent confusion and misleading the public and protect the interests of both parties, acquired through use of their marks in Israel.

cobrasIn the framework of the agreement, the Applicant and the Opposer agree to a number of conditions, designed to protect the Israeli consumers. In addition to restricting the range of goods in the Applications, as detailed below, the Applicant will only use the stylized COBRA mark, and not the word alone. The Opposer will not use the stylized mark. Both parties undertake not to use their marks with respect to goods that the other party has applied for, and thus there is no likelihood of customer confusion.

In accordance with the agreement, the parties have requested that Application number 279193 be restricted to “electric, electro-mechanical or chargeable pliers, wrenches and pipe  wrenches”, and that Application no 284368 will actively disclaim “pliers, wrenches and pipe wrenches”.

The parties request that opposed Israel trademark application nos. 289408 in class 8 for  “water pump pliers and pipe wrenches” be immediately examined and allowed and the Opposition be considered dropped only on publication of the 289408 application as allowed. Should any of this agreement not be acceptable to the Registrar, the parties requested that a hearing to be attended by their legal representatives be scheduled as soon as possible.

RULING

There are three trademark applications. The Applied for marks are stylized and the Opposer’s mark is a simple word mark.

In light of the agreement before her, the Adjudicator, Ms Yaara Shoshani Caspi does not consider that it is sufficient for the Opposer to agree to refrain from using the Applicant’s stylized mark. Also it is insufficient for both parties to refrain from applying for Cobra marks for goods that the other party sells. The Adjudicator considers this insufficient to create the desired difference between the two Cobra marks.

As to correcting the list of goods, the Adjudicator is only partially satisfied.

The list of goods of Israel trademark application no. 279193 in class 7 is as follows:

“Machines and electric and chargeable hand tools, such as electric drills and electric saws; electric and motorized gardening tools, such as choppers, fence trimmers, leaves blowers; air compressors; vacuum cleaners; welding machines; water-pressure washing machines; and electric machines and machine tools for making, processing and cooking food and beverages, namely food processors, meat grinders,  blenders, juice press, vegetable peeling and slicing apparatus; coffee grinders; kneading machines, devices for grinding, milling, crushing and chopping food; electric can openers, electric meat grinders, garbage disposals; vacuum-cleaners; water pressure cleaning devices, steam cleaning devices; and parts and accessories for all the above; all the aforementioned goods excluding electric, electromechanical or chargeable pliers, wrenches and pipe wrenches; all included in class 7.”

The Adjudicator was willing to allow the suggested restriction which disclaims the articles listed by the other party in Israel trademark application no. 289408. However, the agreed list of goods for Israel trademark application no. 284368 in class 8 is not acceptable. That list is as follows:

“Manual hand tools, namely drills, hammers, screws, pinchers, corner nibblers, table nibblers, saws, nibble wheels, razors, electric and non- electric hair clippers and beard, trimmers, scissors to trim hair, nail clippers, electric irons and steam irons, electric hair stylers; parts and accessories for all the above; all the aforementioned goods excluding pliers, wrenches and pipe wrenches; all included in Class 8.”

This is unacceptable since Israel trademark application no. 289408 also includes: “Manual hand tools, namely drills, hammers, screws, pinchers, corner nibblers, table nibblers, saws, nibble wheels”, so the amendment to Israel trademark application no. 284368 is not acceptable.

If, however, Israel trademark application no. 284368 is amended to exclude “Manual hand tools, namely drills, hammers, screws, pinchers, corner nibblers, table nibblers, saws, nibble wheels”, the marks will be considered allowable and the coexistence agreement will be endorsed. The parties have until 19 July 2017 to accept this. There does not seem to be a point in holding a hearing whilst the parties are negotiating, and if the parties fail to come to an agreement, the Opposer should submit their evidence within two months, i.e. by 5 September 2017, with the appropriate fees.

Interim Ruling by Ms Yaara Shoshani Caspi re coexistence of COBRA trademark applications, 6 July 2017.

 


White Beer brewed by Different Monks Not Confusingly Similar

June 7, 2017

benediktineThe Bitburger Braugruppe GmbH applied for Israel Trademark No. 270167 for beer and non-alcoholic beverages in classes 32 and for education and catering services in class 43. The mark includes the words Benediktiner Weissbier and a picture of a Benedictine monk.

FranciscanBefore the mark was examined, Spaten-Franziskaner-Bräu GmbH applied for Israel Trademark No. 273567 for beer and non-alcoholic beverages in classes 32. The mark includes the words Franziskaner Weissbier and a picture of a Franciscan monk.

The Israel Trademark Department considered the marks as being confusingly similar and instituted a competing marks proceeding under Section 29 of the Trademark Ordinance.

Both sides presented their evidence as to who should prevail, but before a date was fixed for a hearing, they hammered out a coexistence agreement and agreed on steps to be taken to minimize the likelihood of the public being confused.

The Deputy Commissioner, Ms Jacqueline Bracha considered that the agreement was acceptable and the two trademarks could coexist.

The Benedictine beer (not to be confused with the liqueur that was a favorite tipple of the last Lubavicher Rebbe) is brewed in a brewery founded in 1609 and has a special recipe used by the monks. Since introduced into Israel in 2012, six million shekels has been spent on advertising and hundreds of thousands of liters were sold each year.

The Franciscan brewery claims to date back to the 14th century and that its label was designed in Munich in 1935. They have a registered trademark in Israel from 1936, and the applied for trademark has been used since 2008 for hundreds of thousands of liters.

Section 30 of the Trademark Ordinance allows for coexistence of marks for the same or similar goods where the Commissioner considers that marks are applied for in good faith.  Since the marks have coexisted for five years in Israel (and are known worldwide) and there is no grounds to conclude that one side or the other is trying to benefit from the competitor’s reputation.

The names sound very different when pronounced and the images of the monks are well established for beers.

The Deputy Commissioner then related to dove cosmetics and to the biosensor ruling and concluded that there was no likelihood of confusion.

Coexistence of the two marks is allowed.

COMMENT

This is a little like the joke about the Jew who was beaten up for sinking the Titanic… iceberg, Goldberg, what’s the difference?

Anyone with any sensitivity to monk habits would easily differentiate between Benediktine and Franciscan monks. Benedictine, being black friars would not be seen dead in brown habits. Franciscans, eschewing wealth, wear habits of peasant fabric, and being capucians, have distinctive hoods on their habits.

Perhaps more significantly, images of barley are generic for beer, and the term weissbier just means pale ale, or lager. Since beer has been brewed by monks for centuries, the image of a monk or someone holding a tankard is hardly distinctive. Even the most inebriated would realize that all the above simply indicate beer, and the it is specifically the terms Franziskaner and Benediktiner that indicate the flavour. Those unable to tell the difference would probably not care what they are drinking anyway.

Because of shipping costs, improrted beer from Germany is relatively expensive and these beers are considered as premium brands. the volume of sales is similar in each case and though adequate to demonstrate that they are established locally, their combined market sector is only a small fraction of beer sales. The Arab population does not drink beer at all, and those willing and able to purchase these lagers are generally well educated and discerning. Coexistence is a reasonable outcome in the circumstances. Furthermore, since the parties proposed coexistence, it is unlikely that anyone will appeal this decision.

 

 


Freshly Squeezed

April 19, 2017

שחוטThis ruling concerns a cancellation request by the originator of a mark against a registered owner who bought the mark with other assets from a company that the originator had sold his business to that had subsequently gone bankrupt.

The grounds for cancellation request were alleged lack of use.

Israel Trademark No. 220623 is for a stylized logo including the phrase “סחוט טרי” transliterated as ‘Schut Tari’ which means freshly squeezed. The mark is owned by Schut Tari 2007 ltd and was registered for nonalcoholic drinks in Class 32.

 

Background

The manager of the Applicant for Cancellation, Mr Ohad Harsonsky set up a factory in the 1990s for producing fruit juices that were marketed under the Schut Tari brand.

orange jewsApproximately in the year 2000, Harsonsky set up the Shut Tari company that continued the activities of the factory. At the beginning of 2005, Harsonsky decided to sell the company and the factory to Pri-fer Natural Marketing and Distribution (2005) ltd. [MF – Pri is Hebrew for fruit. The name is a pun on prefer] which was established by MR Erez Rifkin to make the purchase. Mr Rifkin established Prifer Natural ltd, a company active in the fruit juice industry, in the early 21st Century.

phones-blackberry-orange-phone-fruit-demotivational-posters-1295112418Blackberry on Orange sketch.

After the purchase was concluded, Pri-fer changed their name to ‘Schut Tari Mitz’ Tivi ltd. (Natural Freshly Squeezed Juice ltd), and Schut Tari changed their name to Multi-Pri ltd. The Pri-fer Group started producing freshly squeezed juices and Multi-pri stopped all activities. The Pri-fer Group did not succeed in absorbing all of Schut Tari’s activities, and Pri-fer was late paying the sale price. A business disagreement developed and the Pri-fer Group and Multi-pri agreed to mediation in March 2006. A mediated agreement was given the status of a court ruling by the Ramallah Magistrate’s Court. The mediator was Haim Sodkovitz who represents Eco Alpha, the Applicant for Cancellation.

orange juice squeezerPri-fer and Mr Rifkin were unable to meet the negotiated payment terms that were agreed to in the mediation. Consequently, on 7 March 2007, Harsonsky and Multi-Pri used legal collection means. However, since Rifkin started bankruptcy proceedings and the Pri-fer Group is being disbanded, the bailiffs were unable to collect the debt. Read the rest of this entry »


A Storm in a Coffee Cup

March 20, 2017

This ruling relates to competing rights of different relatives to register and use trademarks for a family business that eventually split up. The marks were registered by a cousin living in Ramallah, and cousins living in East Jerusalem applied to have the marks cancelled on various grounds including passing off, misleading marks, inequitable behavior and lack of use.

234876 LOGOChain Stores of Izhiman Coffee Company own two trademarks: Israel Trademark No. 234876 for the logo shown alongside, and 234877 for the Arabic and English word mark
بن ازحيمان IZHIMAN’S COFFEE.

Maazen and Shapik Izhimian applied to have the marks canceled under Section 39 of the Trademark Ordinance 1972, and further under Section 41 for lack of use.

The marks were first applied for by Muhammad Musa H’alad Izhiman in January 2011, and after examination, were registered on 2 May 2012 for “coffee and coffee spices in class 30.” On 27 February 2014, the marks was assigned to Chain Stores of Izhiman Coffee Company, a Palestinian Company based in Ramallah that was owned by Muhammad Musa H’alad Izhiman and his two sons Kassam and Nasser.

On 5 March 2014, the brothers Maazen and Shapik Izhimian who own a Jerusalem based business in Bet HaBad Street, for marketing and trading in coffee and spices under the name “Izhiman’s Coffee” and who are cousins of Muhammad, submitted a cancellation request. In July 2014, the owners Chain Stores of Izhiman Coffee Company submitted their response.

The Background

EnjoyMuhammad, his three brothers and the Applicants for cancellation are all members of the same clan, that were involved in the family business established by Musa, Muhammad’s father, together with Mahmud, the father of Maazen and Shapik in the 1980s. The company had three addresses, the Ramallah address, the Jerusalem address now run by Maazen and Shapik, and a third branch in Abu Dis.

In 1994, Muhammad fell out with his brothers and nephews and received sole ownership of the Ramallah store. His three brothers and the nephews shared the Abu Dis and the Bet HaBad Jerusalem shops and opened a further outlet themselves in Ramallah. In 2000 the applicants for cancellation and Muhammad’s three brothers opened a fourth branch in Salah Shabati Salahadin Street in East Jerusalem. In 2008, these partners ceased to cooperate, and Maazen and Shapik were left with the Jerusalem Store in Bet HaBad Street.

love.jpgMaazen and Shapik submitted an affidavit written by Maazen and a second one from Riyadh Ghazi Halaq, the owner of a coffee shop near the Bet HaBad address that buys his raw coffee from them. The mark owners responded with an Affidavit by Nasser Muhammad Musa Izhiman, Partner and authorized signatory. At the end of September 2016, the Adjudicator of IP, Ms Yaara Shoshani Caspi held a hearing and the witnesses were cross-examined.
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Coexistence Agreement Rejected and Attorney Accused of Conflict of Interest

August 17, 2016

Kennedy Electricity and Assets Ltd filed Israel Trademark Application Number 246560 for “Belissima”.

Belissima

The application was filed on 15 May 2012 in class 8 for “hair straighteners, hair removers and hair curlers, electrical tongs, shavers et al.” and for hair dryers in class 11. The original application was for a somewhat wider range of goods, but this was narrowed in response to an office action on 31 July 2014.

Bellisima ImetecBefore this mark was registered, the Tenacta Group S.p.A. filed Israel Trademark Application Number 251952 for “Belissima Imetec”. The application was filed on 26 July 2012 under International Application Number 1140345 claiming priority from European trademark number 011073319, and was submitted for “Electric and electronic apparatus and instruments for curling, cutting, waving, straightening, styling, trimming hair; electric epilators; electric pulsed light epilators; electric razors; electric and non-electric apparatus for cutting nails; manicure sets, pedicure sets; electric apparatus for removing, softening nails, corns, bunions ; in class 10 for Ultrasound electric apparatus for medical purposes for cleaning the face and reducing wrinkles; electric radio-frequency apparatus for medical purposes for reducing wrinkles and toning the skin; electric apparatus for the care of skin and acne; electric apparatus for medical purposes which vibrates or rotates for the cleaning of the face, body and for massaging the body; electric apparatus for medical purposes for microdermabrasion and electrostimulators for toning the body”; in class 11 for “hair drying apparatus, electric; heated or LED apparatus for reducing blemishes or imperfections on the skin; electric apparatus for drying nail polish or for decorating the nails; steam facial apparatus (saunas)” and in class 21 for “Electric and non-electric apparatus for removing make-up; brushes and sponges for body care; combs”.

On 7 September 2015 the Trademark Department at the Israel Patent Office informed the applicants that in view of their not reaching agreement, a competing marks procedure would ensue under section 29 of the Trademark Ordinance 1972. On 21 September 2015 the parties submitted a joint statement to the effect that they did not consider the marks confusingly similar and would cooperate to prevent confusion and mistakes by the public. On the basis of this agreement the parties requested that the Section 29 objection be removed.

On 22 October 2015, the Examiner refused to retract the competing marks assessment and to allow coexistence, resulting in the case being transferred to the Commissioner for judicial review.

edward scissorhands

On 9 November 2015 the parties submitted their coexistence agreement to the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks. The parties agreed between themselves that the marks could be registered in parallel. The Tenacta Group undertook to only use the term Belissima in conjunction with either Imetec or Italia to differentiate between the marks. The parties stated that the term Imetec is a trademark that is associated with  the Tenacta Group. Furthermore, the parties undertook to clarify any confusion, should it occur.

In her decision of 18 November 2015, the Deputy Commissioner Ms Jacqueline Bracha rejected the coexistence agreement. In that decision she ruled that:

From the agreement it transpires that not only is there no difference in the goods sold under the two marks, but that the first applicant (Kennedy Electricity and Assets ltd.) would be the distributor of the Tenacta Group’s products.

So the parties were invited to state their claims.

sweeneytoddOn 2 March 2016 the parties submitted a joint notice that the first applicant (Kennedy) will remove all goods in classes 8 and 11 from their application, and the Patent Office was asked to reconsider its ruling in light of this development.

In her ruling of 3 March 2016, Ms Bracha stated:

“After reviewing the details of the goods covered by the two marks it is possible to accept the coexistence agreement on condition that ‘combs’ are removed from the list of goods in class 21 for the 251952 mark and that the 246560 mark be combined with Kennedy’s logo and only used therewith. These conditions are intended to protect the public from confusion since the relevant public and the distribution channels are identical.”

Following this decision, the parties submitted additional notices. On 10 March 2015, the Tenacta group announced that its application was only for the stylized mark shown above that includes the term INTETEC and that its mark was for registration in classes 10 and 21 only, and that Kennedy was not attempting to register its mark for goods in those classes. Consequently there was no reason not to allow coexistence. However, Kennedy claimed in a notice of 13 March 2016 that it was not prepared to limit its application to goods carrying the Kennedy logo together with the stylized Belissima mark since it was not marketing the Belissima brand under the Kennedy logo, and they requested reinstatement of the competing marks procedure.

Following Kennedy’s submission, Ms Bracha gave the parties two months to submit their evidence. Some days later, the Tenacta Group again requested coexistence of the marks. On 18 April 2016 Ms Bracha again requested that the parties submit their evidence. On 19 April 2016, the Tenacta Group restated that the parties had reached agreement and that the marks could coexist. On 20 April 2016 Ms Bracha ordered the Tenacta Group to clarify how their notice fulfilled her request. In the same decision it was clarified that this clarification did not extend the deadline for submission of evidence. On 2 May 2016, the Tenacta Group detailed why coexistence was in order. Read the rest of this entry »