Panama Jack

April 23, 2017

Panama JackPanama Jack Inc. submitted a cancellation request against registered Israel TM No. 79826 for a Panama Jack pendant which was registered back in 1994 in group 25 by Grupp Internacional SA.

Section 41(a) of the 1972 Tradeamrk Ordinance states that:

Any interested party may request cancellation of a trademark on the grounds that there was never a good faith intention of using the mark and that the mark was not used in good faith within the three year period prior to the cancellation request being submitted.

Registered trademarks are considered property rights in all respects and should not be undermined without due consideration. The requester for cancellation was to show that the mark was not in use. See 476/82 Orloged.vs. Commissioner of Patents p.d. 39 (2) 148. The burden of evidence then bounces back and forth between the parties, and if the challenger provides prima facie evidence that shows that a mark should not be cancelled, the burden of proof then falls on the mark owner to dispute the evidence brought by the challenger and to supply evidence that there was, in fact, use of the mark. Where there remains a doubt, this works for the benefit of the mark owner, and the mark will not be cancelled. BAGATZ 296/89 Philip Morris vs. Moorgate Tobacco Co Ltd. p.d. 41 (1) 485.

Regulation 70 of the 1940 Trademark Regulations state that:

A request to correct a registration or to cancel a registered mark from the register will detail the facts and the requested correction and will be submitted in two copies; one to the Registrar and the other to the owner of the mark.

In this instance no one denies that the mark owner received a copy of the cancellation request.

Section 71 of the regulations state the case should continue as follows:

With submission of a cancellation request with copy to the registered owner, the matter proceeds in accordance with regulations 37 to 46 (opposition regulations) with the appropriate changes.

The mark owner has two months, i.e. until 30 January 2017 to respond. In this instance, he failed to do so and also failed to request an extension of time. In so doing, Section 71(a)a applies:

If the owner of a mark does not submit a response under Sefction 70 within two months, the Commissioner will give the supplicant two months to state their case.

In this instance, as the mark owner has failed to respond, the Supplicant for cancellation has two months to submit their evidence.

Re 79826 Grupp Internacional vs. Panama Jack, Intermediate Ruling Shoshana Yaara Caspi, 13 March 2017


Trademark Cancellations – Jumping on the band wagon

April 23, 2017

the herbsMichael Noy-Meir owns Israel TM No. 106994 for “Supherbs”. He is represented by Chani Rosenberg and Associates.

Ambrosia Supherb LTD filed a cancellation request and Peretz Gan, represented by Chani Roenberg and Associates wishes to join the case as a third-party. Peretz Gan claims to be a partner with Noy-Meir the mark owner for 20 years and that both of them used the mark over a twelve-year period.

The Cancellation request was submitted on 3 November 2016 and on 27 November 2016, Peretz Gan requested that the mark be assigned to him, based on an agreement from 19 September 2016.

On 4 January 2017, Deputy Commissioner Jacqueline Bracha ruled that if the mark survives the cancellation process, it may be assigned, but cannot be assigned whilst under attack.

Ambrosia Supherb LTD object to Peretz Gan being added as a third-party. They claim that there is insufficient evidence that he was rights in the mark as required by Regulation 72 of the 1940 trademark regulations. The Supplicant for Cancellation has also requested that following submission of an Affidavit, a date for a hearing be set.

Regulation 72 states:

Any person other than the registered proprietor who claims to have a benefit in a registered trade mark in respect of which an application has been filed under regulation 70 may apply to the Registrar for permission to allow him to join the proceeding and the Registrar may refuse or grant such permission after hearing the parties concerned and to set the conditions that he shall deem necessary. Before the application is heard in any manner whatsoever, the Registrar may demand that the applicant make an undertaking to pay the same expenses that the Registrar shall award to one of the parties in the circumstances.

The Deputy Commissioner does not see justification to reject the request. Section 72 sets a low bar for adding third parties to cancellation or opposition proceedings. It is adequate for a third-party to declare some interest to be cojoined to the proceeding. The Deputy Commissioner does not consider that the third party has to prove standing and refers to the Patent Office Ruling concerning 216,916 Danny Argon vs. Strauss Culture Factories LTD (11 November 2012):

Where the Third party claims apparent rights to a mark and excluding him from the proceeding would have negative consequences, it seems appropriate to include him in the proceedings as it seems improper to prevent him for stating his case.

A hearing is set for 20 April 2017 at 2 PM and the third-party may submit his supporting affidavit by 6 April 2017.


Patent to Astrazeneca  Successfully Opposed by Teva

April 20, 2017

Rosuvastatin_structure.svgRosuvastatin is a member of the statin class of drugs that is used in combination with exercise, diet, and weight-loss to treat high cholesterol and related conditions, and to prevent cardiovascular disease.

Israel Patent IL 166626 to Astrazeneca is the National Phase of PCT/GB2003/003463 filed in August 2003 and titled ” Process for preparing the calcium salt of rosuvastatin 

The Application was allowed and published for opposition in September 20011 and Teva filed an Opposition. A hearing was held in July 2015, and by June 2016 both sides had finished submitting their summaries and counter summaries.

The patent covers a process for obtaining (E)-7-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-6-isopropyl-2-[methyl(methylsulfonyl)amino]pyrimidin-5-yl](3R,5S)-3,5-dihydroxyhept-6-enoic acid calcium salt. The application included 27 claims of which the first, independent claim is as follows: Read the rest of this entry »


Cancellation Proceedings Against an Israel Patent for a Modular Support Bracket

April 6, 2017

Figs for ACMoshe Lavi registered Israel Patent No. 157035 titled “MODULAR SUPPORT BRACKET”. A competitor, Zach Oz Air Conditioning LTD and Zach Raz filed to have the patent cancelled on grounds of invalidity. They seem to have botched the attempt, but I think that this ruling is a poor one.

Background

In the past, Lavi has tried enforcing the patent against Zach Oz Air Conditioning LTD. (Back then, around 2004, I was engaged as an expert witness by Counsel of the Defence, Soroker Agmon. In my Expert Opinion, I argued what is known as ‘the Gilette Defense’ stating that the correct interpretation of the claims was much narrower than that which Lavi and his lawyers Pearl Cohen Zedek Latzer Bratz (Pearl-Cohen) was using and Zach Oz’ support bracket was not infringing. Furthermore, if one considered that Zach Oz’ brackets were within the ambit of the claims, the patent would not have issued in the light of the myriad of prior art shelf support brackets.  On the day of the trial, Lavi dropped the charges and Zach Oz agreed not to infringe the patent.

It was not the first time that Pearl-Cohen have tried to assert a patent against a competitor that was not infringing. They tried this in the US on behalf of Source Vagabond against Hydropak. In that instance, the New York District Court fined Pearl-Cohen and the lawyers actively handling the case $187,308.65. That ruling was then Appealed to and upheld by the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals).

Frustrated by repeated bullying by Moshe Lavi and Pearl-Cohen, Zach Oz filed a cancellation proceeding against the Israel patent. Confusingly, their Attorney is called Pearl. It is not Zeev Pearl, but another practitioner.

Pearl-Cohen submitted a rather ambitious attempt to have the case thrown out as Zach Oz had not argued invalidity when accused of infringing, and Pearl-Cohen argued that this was a sort of in absentia estoppel since they could have raised the argument back then, and didn’t. The Commissioner threw that argument out, and allowed the cancellation proceeding to proceed.

The cancellation proceeding has now run its course and the following article Read the rest of this entry »


Getting a Handle on Israel Design Registration

March 26, 2017

Furnipart

Although there is a proposed Law in the works, in Israel, design registration follows the somewhat archaic Patent and Design Ordinance 1924 inherited from the British Mandate. Formally, only local novelty is required! In a Circular, Previous Commissioner Dr Meir Noam creatively interpreted the Law such that Internet publication in official Patent Office websites that are acceptable in Israel would be considered as published in Israel. As discussed in this blog, that Circular is arguably ultra-vires in that such a determination arguably requires at least Ministry of Justice regulations if not a change in the Law. The present ruling by Outgoing Commissioner Kling relates to this Circular.

This ruling concerns seven design registrations – 55598 to 55604 – all of which were titled ‘Handle’ and were filed on 20 May 2014 in class 08-06 for handles and hinges by Furnipart.

On 22 March 2015, the Applicant received an Office Action that alleged that the design were lacking in the novelty and originality required by Section 30(1) of the Patent and Design Ordinance 1924 since the designs were identical to those registered in the name of the Applicant in Europe which were registered and published prior to submission of the Applications in Israel.

In addition to the 55602 registration that was submitted to the EPO on 18 October 2013 and which published on 15 November 2014, all the applications were submitted on 21 February 2014 and published on 26 March 2014.

The Applicant failed to respond to the Office Actions in the period specified in Regulation 28 of the Design Regulations, and on 23 June 2015, a reminder was sent warning the Applicant that failure to respond within 30 days with a request for a retroactive extension would lead to the applications being considered abandoned.

On 10 August 2015, the Applicant sent a response in which he claimed that the designs were, indeed registered in Europe, but apart from the publication on the EPO website, there was no publication in Israel. The Applicant claimed that the Israel Application was filed within the six month time frame of the European filings which is within the grace period from the first filing (Denmark) given in Section 52a(1) of the Ordinance.  Consequently, the European filing date should be considered the effective filing date in Israel.

On 13 August 2005, the Applicant was sent a notice that stated that further examination required payment of the extension fee, and which referenced Circular M.N. 69 from 25 December 2008 and to Section 53(2) of the Ordinance, noting that the Applications did not, claim priority.

On 9 September 2015, the Applicant was sent a second Office Action clarifying that under Circular M.N. 69, an Internet publication is considered as a publication that is published in Israel and so the Applications are contrary to Section 30(1) of the Ordinance. Similarly, it was noted that priority was not requested within two months of submission as required by Section 52(2) and so the effective filing date was the actual filing date in Israel.

On 15 December 2015 in light of the rejection of 9 September, the Applicant requested a hearing and this was geld on 18 April 2016.

Prior to the hearing, the Applicant submitted his main pleadings on 11 April 2016., during which he reiterated the above claims. He also alleged that Circular M.N. 69 differentiates between official and commercial publications and the European Patent Office publication was not meant to be published in Israel, even if it is accessible on line from Israel since the Israel design is not in force. Based on this ‘logic’, the Applicant claims that he is within the requirements of Section 52(a)1 of the Ordinance since there is a six month’s grace period.

 The Ruling

Section 30(1) of the Ordinance states:

The registrar may, on the application made in the prescribed form and manner of any person claiming to be the proprietor of any new or original design not previously published in Israel register the design under this Part.

So registration is contingent on no prior publication in Israel.

In Section 6 of Circular M.N. 69 from 24 December 2008, the previous Commissioner ruled that :

One can cite designs that have published on the Internet before the filing date in Israel, since there is evidence of their publication date.

To cite something against novelty of a design, section 7 of M.N. 69 relates explicitly to publications in patent offices abroad.

Use of Internet publications shall be done with the required care and only where the Examiner considers that he can rely on it indeed having published prior to the Israel filing date. For example, publication in databases in the official European patent office website OHIM, the USPTO and WIPO, etc. which publish the publication date of each design.

As far as relying on Internet publication, Examiners have been warned to cite these with due care – see the 51593 and 51594 Tequila Cuervo ruling from 9 June 2013, particularly paragraphs 44 and 45, and the ruling concerning various designs to Naot Shoes (1994) ltd published on 1 June 2016 

The same required care regarding the publication date, content and likelihood of Israel based surfers seeing the publication was considered in paragraph 10 of the 45452 Sejec Vanja ruling published on 28 February 2012: 

The language of Section 30(1) of the Ordinance states ‘… not having published earlier in Israel. This does not require that anyone has actually seen the publication…such was always the interpretation, even prior to the Internet age. The question is whether the publication was accessible. See for example the Appeal 430/67 Sharnoa ltd. et al. vs. Tnuva et al. (1968):

“The law regarding prior publication in a book of this type is based on the book being found in a place accessible to the public, such as a public library is considered sufficient publication, since one can assume that in this manner, the design reaches the public knowledge”.

In light of the above, one cannot accept the Applicant’s allegation that the previous publications are not novelty destroying, since reason that Patent Office Internet accessible databases are considered publications is the ease with which one can verify the publication date. This is certainly the case where the applicant does not deny the trustworthiness of the site and of the listed publication date, only whether Israelis would have access to inspect there.

Priority Date

The Applicant claims that despite the earlier publications that are novelty destroying for the applied for designs, the effective filing date in Israel should be considered as being the actual filing date in Europe.

Section 52(a) states:

If a design owner submits a request to register a design that has previously been filed by himself or by  his predecessors in title, a request to file in one or more friendly states (henceforth priority), he may request that as far as sections 30(a) and 36 are concerned, that the earliest priority date will be considered the filing date in Israel if all the following conditions are met:
(1) The Israel Application is submitted within six months of the earliest priority; and
(2) A priority request is submitted within two months of filing.

Firstly, it is stressed that contrary to the Applicant’s claims, Section 52 that the priority date is determined with reference to Sections 30(1) and 36, i.e. with respect to novelty and earlier publication. This does not mean that where a priority claim is made, that the Israel application automatically is awarded the priority date.

In this instance, the previous applications were filed on 21 February 2014 and then in Israel on 20 May 2014, i.e. within the six months grace period for which I priority request can be made. However, filing within six months of the prior application is insufficient since the second clause requires that the Applicant makes a priority claim within two months of the Israel filing date.

On 21 October 2014, this two month period for requesting priority in Israel passed, the period for which the application can rely on the filing date of earlier applications with respect to Sections 30(1) and 36 passed without Applicant requesting priority.

The Commissioner does not agree with the Applicant that the mere filing of an Application in the period provided for in clause 1 is sufficient since Section 52 requires both conditions to be fulfilled: filing within six months and making a timely request for recognition of the priority date. These conditions are complimentary – section 52(a) states explicitly that it applies if all the following conditions are met. One condition being fulfilled does not waive the other. So there is consensus that merely filing within six months does not result in priority being recognized.

Since the full requirements were only met a year after the two month deadline, the Applicant is not entitled to the priority date.

In the hearing, the Applicant’s representative noted that section 54 gives the Commissioner the discretionary powers to extend deadlines in the regulations even retroactively. The Commissioner considers that this regulation does not give him the power to extend deadlines in the Ordinance itself, including extending the priority claim.

The Application is rejected and the designs will not register.

Ruling concerning Design Numbers 55598 to 55604 “Handles” by Asa Kling, 21 February 2017.

COMMENT

four candles  The classic 1976 Fork Handles sketch may be found here.


Unipharm Successfully Opposes Novartis Patent for Panobinostat Lactate Salts

March 26, 2017

PanobinostatThis ruling relates to an opposition against a patent application by Novartis for Panobinostat  which is a hydroxamic acid  that acts as a non-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor (pan-HDAC inhibitor).  On 23 February 2015 the drug received FDA accelerated approval for use in patients with multiple malignancies, and on 28 August 2015 it was approved by the European Medicines Agency for the same use.

The Opposer claimed that the drug was described in the Applicant’s earlier published PCT application and was thus both anticipated (known) and obvious. The Commissioner rejected the anticipation claim but accepted that in light of the earlier publication, it was obvious and lacked an inventive step.

Due to the ruling being rather interesting but only available in Hebrew, and since these Israeli rulings can and do have an effect on validity of corresponding patents elsewhere, I have translated the decision in full. At the end I have made some general comments.

Background

NovartisNovartis AG filed Israel Patent Application Number 195087 titled “ANHYDROUS LACTATE SALTS OF ANHYDROXY-3-[4-[[[2-(2-METHYL-1HINDOL-3 YL)ETHYL]AMINO]METHYL] PHENYL] – 2E-2-PROPENAMIDE AND PHARMACEUTICAL COMPOSITIONS COMPRISING THE SAME” as a national phase of PCT/US2007/070558 that was filed on 7 June 2006 and claims priority from US 60/804523 and US 60/869993, two US provisional patent applications filed in June and December 2006 respectively. The Israel national phase entry was submitted on 3 November 2008 and, on allowance, published for opposition purposes on 31 October 2012.

UnipharmUnipharm opposed the application on 3 January 2013. Subsequently, on 26 June 2013, Novartis requested to correct the application and, since neither Unipharm nor anyone else opposed this, the application was corrected and this ruling concerns an opposition to the amended application.

The parties submitted their claims and evidence and a hearing was held Read the rest of this entry »


More Coffee!

March 23, 2017

EdenFollowing on the heels of the Izhimis family feud, we now report on a competing marks proceeding between Abu Shukra Import Export and Marketing Ltd and Strauss Coffee B.V.

Again, this relates to Turkish coffee. On 2 May 2013, Abu Shukra filed Israel TM application number 255526 in class 30 shown alongside.

This ruling relates to all over packaging designs being used as trademarks and to branding concepts. To my mind, it also raises issues of monopolies and market abuse, but this is beyond the competence of the adjudicator and commissioner to relate to, although I think judges might see things differently.

22263EliteOn 16 July 2014, but before Abu Shukra’s mark was examined, Strauss filed Israel TM Application No. 266680 for Coffee, roasted coffee, roasted and ground coffee and coffee substitutes, all in class 30, and also Israel TM Application No. 266683 for Turkish coffee, roasted Turkish coffee, roasted and ground Turkish coffee and Turkish coffee substitutes, all in class 30. Strauss Coffee’s marks are shown alongside.

[At this stage we note that Strauss Coffee owns the Elite brand among many others. Strauss employees 14,000 people in 20 countries. The empire was built on their Turkish coffee brand, but they also now own Sabra, the leading hummus brand in the US, are partners with Yotvata dairies and Yad Mordechai Honey – MF]. Read the rest of this entry »