Totachi

July 6, 2017

277424Totachi Kougyo Co ltd submitted Israel Trademark Application Number 277424. The Application was in classes 4, 7, 9, 11 and 12 and is shown alongside. The Application is the national phase of an International Trademark under the Madrid Protocol. On 6 December 2016, the mark was allowed and under Section 56vi of the Trademark Ordinance, the International Bureau was notified with details about the deadline for Oppositions.

On 27 March 2017, Total SA filed an Opposition in accordance with Section 24(a) of the Trademark Ordinance 19722 and regulation 35 of the 1940 regulations. Consequently, on 29 March 2017, the International Office was informed, together with the deadline for responding.

The Applicant had two months, until 29 May 2017 to respond to the Opposition. However, until the date of this decision, 18 June 2017, no response was received from the Applicant. On 11 June 2017, the Opposer requested that the Israel Patent and Trademark Office note that the since no timely response was received, the Opposition should be accepted and the mark considered cancelled.

The Adjudicator of Intellectual Property, Ms Shoshani Caspi, accepted this request. Consequently the mark is considered withdrawn and the International Bureau will be duly informed. No costs are awarded.

Decision re Israel Trademark Application 277424 to Totachi Kougyo Co ltd, 18 June 2017


Greenlander

April 30, 2017

greenlander

Israel Trademark Application Number 274365 to Shandong  Longyue Rubber Co., Ltd.  for GREENLANDER is the national phase of Madrid Trademark Application No. 1245051

The Application covers tires for vehicle wheels; airplane tyre; repair outfits for inner tubes, tires solid for vehicle wheels; casings for pneumatic tires; automobile tires; vehicle seats; upholstery for vehicles; brake linings for vehicles; automobile chassis.

On allowance, this published for opposition purposes.

Jaguar Land Rover Limited filed an Opposition and the Israel Patent and Trademark Office sent a copy to WIPO.  Shandong  Longyue Rubber Co., Ltd did not respond so the mark is considered as abandoned.


Israel Trademark No. 268867 to M Yildiz Saadettin Cancelled Following Challenge by the Polo/Lauren Company

January 8, 2017

The Polo/Lauren Company filed a request for an opposition ruling against Israel Trademark No. 268867 in classes 14, 18 and 25. The mark was filed by M Yildiz Saadettin as part of international application number 11451800 which listed Israel as one of the countries covered.

In accordance with Rule 56vi, on 7 July 2016 the Israel Patent Office wrote to the International Office of WIPO to the effect that the mark was accepted, and indicated that there was a three month period for opposition. A similar letter was sent to the Applicant’s representative.

On 5 October 2016 the Polo/Lauren Company submitted  a detailed opposition to the registration in all three classes, under Section 24 of the Trademark Ordinance and Regulations 35 to 466 of the 1940 regulations. Following this, the Israel Patent and Trademark Office informed the applicant that such a proceedings had been initiated, giving them the deadline for responding.   by filing a counter-statement of case. The Applicant had two months, until 4 December 2016 to respond.

Until the time of writing this decision on 25 December 2016, no response was received.


Gentlefile – Trademarking Portmanteau Words

November 2, 2016

Gentlefile is a portmanteau of ‘gentle’ and ‘file’. An Israel trademark application was filed for the GENTLEFILE covering flexible soft dental files. Ill-advisedly, the pending application was then used as the basis for an International application under Madrid.

Medic NRG Ltd filed Israel trademark application No. 255358 for the word Gentlefile. The application covers surgical, medical, dlogoental and veterinary apparatus and instruments; parts and accessories for the aforementioned products; all included in class 10.

The Application was filed on 1 May 2015 and was the basis for subsequent International Application No. 1189965 under the Madrid Protocol in accordance with Section 56(c)(1) of the Trademark Ordinance 1972.

On 17 September 2014 the Trademark Department of the Israel Patent Office refused the Application under Section 8(a) and 11(10) of the Ordinance as lacking inherent distinctiveness and being descriptive of the goods covered. The Examiner considered that the word was a portmanteau of gentle and file, and implied a filing implement that was mild or tender, and consequently the term was descriptive of dental filing apparatus. The Examiner stated that the term implied:

Devices and equipment that are smooth or soft, mild tender to the touch and which deflect on use or gentle touch medical equipment that gives a pleasant and good feeling to patients.

Furthermore, after reviewing the Internet website of the Applicant, the Examiner concluded that since the main activity of the applicant is to provide dental equipment, the term file is descriptive by its nature.

little-shop-of-horrorsThe Applicant claimed that the mark is distinctive and the goods to be protected are not soft, smooth or pleasant dental equipment and so the mark is not descriptive. The Applicant further alleged that a reasonable person would not associate the mark with dental equipment since smooth, soft, mild instruments can be used in a variety of fields, and at the Examiner’s request the Applicant appended examples of usage of the mark in its publicity material and the description of goods accepted on its basis by the United States trademark office on 12 August 2014.

mr-bean-dentistThe Examiner was not convinced and issued a second Office Action. In response the Applicant claimed that the applied for mark had many alternatives meanings and none of them described the goods covered. The Applicant claimed that the word file meant case, computer document, line or rasp, and that the Applicant had developed the mark and used it for years and had now began registering around the world, including the European Community, the United States, China and Russia.

The Examiner dug in her heels and continued to hold the mark non-registerable.  She claimed that the term file was a rasp-like instrument that was used in root canal treatment and the term “gentle file” is descriptive in that it relates to a flexible hand tool. The Examiner provided examples of dentists referring to such a tool as being a file and noted that it only requires one of the meanings to be a generic description to make a mark non-registerable.

oral-proceedingThe Applicant requested a judicial ruling based on the arguments on record and an oral proceeding.

RULING

The Deputy Commissioner Ms Jacqueline Bracha summed up the legal question as whether GENTLEFILE is inherently distinctive, and, if not, whether it can be considered as having acquired distinctiveness.

Section 8 of the Ordinance makes registerability dependent on distinctiveness:

8.—(a) No mark is eligible for registration as a trade mark unless it is adapted to distinguish the goods of the proprietor of the mark from those of other persons (a mark so adapted being hereinafter referred to as a “distinctive mark”).

(b) In determining whether a trade mark is distinctive, the Registrar or the Court may, in the case of a trade mark in actual use, take into consideration the extent to which such use has rendered such trade mark in fact distinctive for goods in respect of which it is registered or intended to be registered.

A trademark having distinctive character enables distinguishing the goods of one company from another. See the Bible Seligsohn “Trademark Laws and Related Legislation” page 20 (1973).

It is generally considered that marks fall into the following categories: generic, descriptive, indicative, randomly selected and made up. There is a continuum from generic marks to made up ones (See 5792/99 Communication and Religious-Jewish Education Family (1997) Ltd “Family” Magazine vs. SBS Advertising, Marketing and Sales Promotion Ltd. “Good Family” Magazine, Supreme Court Ruling 2001(11) 534 (23 May 2001). At the made up mark end are marks with inherent distinctiveness, whereas at the generic end are marks that cannot be registered.

Section 11(10) of the Ordinance determines that marks that describe the goods that they are to label cannot be registered unless they have acquired distinctiveness:

a mark consisting of numerals, letters or words which are in common use in trade to distinguish or describe goods or classes of goods or which bear direct reference to their character or quality, unless the mark has a distinctive character within the meaning of section 8(b) or 9;

The mere fact that a descriptive mark is not in Hebrew does not make it registerable in Israel since the accepted terms should remain in the public domain, even if they are not in Hebrew. (Seligsohn page 35, and 3552/02 Toto Gold Club Ltd vs. The Counsel for Regulating Sports Gambling (26 September 2004).

Thus the general rule is that there is no place to drag descriptive names from common language and to remove them from the public domain and to relate them to specific goods unless they have acquired distinctiveness. 

The degree of descriptiveness of a mark is determined with respect to the intended goods or services and not in a vacuum. (see Appeal 21488-05-11 Eveready Battery Company Inc.  vs. The Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks 8 December 2011. The mark will be considered in its entirety and not analyzed into its components as this is how the consumer regards the mark (see Appeal 5454/02 Tiv Taam  Teva (1988) Tivoli vs. Ambrosia Superhav Pd 57(2) 438).

No-one denies that the marks are intended for medical usage in general and for dentistry in particular. The consumer in this instance is not the general public but rather dentistry practitioners such as dental surgeons, assistants, dental technicians and the like. So the way the mark is regarded has to be considered from their perspective and not from that of others not in the field.

The applied for mark is a combination of two words without a space so that they are viewed as a single word. The portmanteau word comprises file and gentle which mean mild and a tool that is generally steel that has sharp crevices and is used to smooth and flatten surfaces such as human teeth. In dentistry this tool is used to remove plaque from teeth. The word file also means computer document, divisional arrangement and line.

When considering the words in the appropriate context, that is with regards to medical devices for dental applications, the Deputy Commissioner concludes that both ‘gentle’ and ‘file’ are descriptive terms. That the words have other meanings in different contexts to a different audience in no way detracts from them being descriptive in the relevant field, since one has to consider the marks with respect to the services and goods for which they are to be used. The word file has a specific dental meaning and the word gentle is a qualifier that describes a relevant property whose meaning is well understood in this context. As the Examiner concluded, in this instance, we are dealing with flexible tools and it transpires from the Applicant’s own marketing material that it is their softness/gentleness that describes them.

The mark should be considered in its entirety as this is how the target audience perceives it as a trademark. In this context the combination does add something beyond the sum of the parts which increases the likelihood of the mark being considered registerable.

However, it has been determined that merely joining two words together is insufficient to render a mark distinctive unless the combination provides added value. With reference to Page 38 of Seligsohn:

A complex mark of this type cannot over time and through usage lose the plain meaning of the words from which it is comprised, rather a combination has to inherently include something imaginative that the descriptiveness is no longer revealed.

In this regard, reference is made to the Opposition against Israel Trademark Application No. 202424 “MAXIMUMASP” MAXIMUMASP LLC vs. Sky Net Group Ltd (30 June 2010:

The element that Judge Zilberg refers to as “An invention”, and which the European Court calls “Linguistically Unique” is not separate from the second element, that is having acquired a separate meaning from the original one. This means to say, the creativeness is the originality that changes two known and descriptive words into a third phrase which in turn indicates or describes the original meaning, is tested not just in that the phrase adds something, but that the addition provides the phrase with a meaning that is blatant and is the first thing to jump into the viewer’s brain, and which clouds out the original meaning, even were he to think of the original meaning if contemplating the mark. We can already say that the mere combining of two words into one, and even if a letter is thereby deleted, is no proof that the resultant word has the inventiveness required.

The term ‘Gentlefile’ is indeed a portmanteau of two words rolled into one, but it does not appear that the combination creates a new meaning beyond the literal meaning of the combination. In this instance there isn’t even a letter that has been deleted or changed, merely the space between the noun and adjective has been deleted. Thus the combination lacks the essential element of inventiveness that creates an additional meaning beyond the original meaning of gentle file.

Without ruling on whether the combination is too descriptive to be able to acquire distinctiveness through use (2673/04 Appeal Copy to Go marketing (1997 Ltd. vs Israel Shaqued 15 April 2007) the Applicant has not furnished sufficient evidence to persuade that the mark has indeed acquired distinctiveness as required for registration under Section 8(b) of the Ordinance.

Examining acquired distinctiveness of a mark is done with reference to how long the mark is in use, the amount of publicity gained and the resources invested by the Applicant / Owner in creating a linkage between the mark and the goods in the public perception. (see Toto above). Furthermore, one should examine if due to the mark the public connects the goods and services with the mark Applicant/Owner. (see Appeal 18/86 Israel Class Company Venezia vs. Les Verries de Saint Gobain, p.d. 45(3) 224, 238 (1991).

The Applicant did append examples of advertising material from Israel and abroad showing the mark to their responses to the Office Action, and also submitted examples of registrations for the mark from other countries. The Applicant did  not supply details of sales, investment in marketing, the period over which the mark was in use, and the like.

Where marks are far from the imaginative end of the spectrum and are more descriptive-generic, it is more difficult for the Applicant to meet the burden of proof to show acquired distinctiveness. (see Toto paragraph 9). Since the Applicant did not append sufficient evidence to prove this and relied on foreign advertising and registrations, without additional evidence there is no way to ascertain that there is local acquired distinctiveness.

In conclusion, Ms Bracha ruled that the Application be rejected.

Ruling by Deputy Commissioner Ms Jacqueline Bracha on Registerability of Israel Trademark Application No. 255258 Gentlefile, 21 September 2016

COMMENT
Where a mark is arguably descriptive such as in this case, it is not advisable to use a pending application as the basis of a Madrid filing since central attack on the application voids the Madrid trademark registrations.

What I believe the Applicant should have done in this case is to first register the logo that appears above. The mere addition of the graphic element makes this more than a mere combination of words. Using this as a logo without challenges will be good evidence of acquired distinctiveness when subsequently attempting to register the portmanteau word. It is likely that the company sells dental tools worldwide and does not concentrate on the local market which is small since there are only 8.5 million Israelis for dentists to treat. In a small market it is possible to acquire distinctiveness and to become the market leader but this requires strategically deciding to do so. As always, descriptive names should be avoided.

It is difficult to blame the Attorney of record in this case as it is more than likely that they provided good advice and the client went ahead and chose a poor name and tried to protect it. If they didn’t, there would be little work for trademark attorneys.

 


Israel Trademark No. 158991 “פליסקה, PLISKA, ПЛИСКА” (stylized)

September 12, 2016

pliskaIsrael Trademark No. 158991 “פליסקה, PLISKA, ПЛИСКА” (stylized) was registered on 1 September 2014 for alcoholic drinks in class 33. On 24 March 2005 half the ownership was transferred from Capital Food Company ltd. to D.I.L. Trade (Maglan) ltd.

On 2 February 2016, Vinex Preslav Joint-Stock Company filed a request to have the trademark struck from the register due to alleged lack of use during the previous three years. Vinex Preslav Joint-Stock Company is a Bulgarian company that claims to have used the term Pliska for alcoholic beverages since 1994, and has registered the mark worldwide under the Madrid Protocol since 2005. Vonex Preslav claim to have sales in Israel.

Furthermore, Vinex Preslav notes that there is an agreement between the registered owners, Capital Food Company Ltd. and D.I.L. Trade (Maglan) Ltd, that was submitted to the Israel Patent Office, under which D.I.L. Trade (Maglan) Ltd undertook not to use the mark from 1 January 2005 onwards.

On 31 March 2016, Capital Food Company Ltd. submitted their statement of case. They claim that their rights to the Pliska trademark outweigh those of Vinex Preslav, that they have used the mark in recent years and intend to continue using it. Capital Food Company Ltd allege that a cancellation request filed 14 years after a mark was registered is surprising and itself indicates that the mark has a reputation.

On 25 May 2016, Capital Food Company Ltd submitted a request to transfer the mark to Vinex Preslav in accordance with an agreement reached between the parties. However, on 31 May 2016, Vinex Preslav submitted their evidence to have the mark canceled and requested a decision based on the evidence submitted without a hearing.

Vinex Preslav requested that the cancellation ruling be based on a statement by Mr Vadim Farber, the CEO of Carmi International Foods Ltd, who is the distributor in Israel that Vinex Preslav uses. Mr Vadim Farber affirmed the existence and contents of an agreement between Capital Food Company Ltd. and D.I.L. Trade (Maglan) Ltd. under which D.I.L. Trade (Maglan) ltd. were obliged not to use the mark, and he further affirmed that the mark had not been used in Israel over the previous three years.

Vinex Preslav also submitted a statement from Ronen Menashe, an investigator at SML Israel Intelligence Ltd, in which he affirmed that his investigations had yielded no evidence of usage by D.Y.L. Trade (Maglan) Ltd. today or over the past ten years. Mr Menashe had held a conversation with the director of D.I.L. Trade (Maglan) Ltd. who explained that he conducted his affairs via a further company, since D.I.L. Trade (Maglan) ltd.  is no longer active. Furthermore, the new company does not make any usage of Israel Trademark No. 158991 “פליסקה, PLISKA, ПЛИСКА”. Mr Menashe also visited a number of shops spelling wines and spirits but none of them sold products with Israel Trademark No. 158991 “פליסקה, PLISKA, ПЛИСКА” on it, or any other products manufactured by D.I.L. Trade (Maglan) ltd.

On 21 June 2016, Capital Food Company Ltd announced that they no longer had any connection with D.I.L. Trade (Maglan) Ltd, would not be submitting evidence, and requested a ruling based on the material of record.

RULING

Section 41 of the Trademark Ordinance 1972 states:

41. [a] Without prejudice to the generality of the provision of sections 38 to 40, application for the cancellation of the Registration of a trade mark regarding some or all of the goods or classes of goods in respect of which a trade mark is registered (hereinafter – goods regarding which the cancellation is requested) may be made by any person interested on the ground that there was no bona fide intention to use the trade mark in connection with the goods for which it is registered in connection with the goods regarding which there is a request to cancel the registration and that there has in fact been no bona fide use of the trade mark in connection with those goods in connection with the goods regarding which there is a request to cancel the registration, or that there had not been any such use during the three years preceding the application for cancellation.

The purpose of the section is to keep the trademark register clean from non-used marks. See BAGATZ 67/71 “Prem” Ltd. vs Registrar of Trademarks, p.d. 28(1) 802, 811, where, with respect to the previous version of the section it was ruled that:

Section 22 is intended, primarily, if not exclusively, to purify the trademark register of all marks that are not in use and without bona fide intent to use. This is a national issue, so that registers are not weighed down with theoretical marks. It was not incidental that the legislators required bona fide usage after registration.

The requester for cancellation first claimed that the owners had never used the mark in Israel. Following the request to transfer the mark to them by the current owners, there is no need to cancel the mark, but only to transfer ownership and to delete D.I.L. Trade (Maglan) Ltd from the register.

It will be noted that Section 41 of the ordinance allows for full or partial cancellation of a mark by narrowing the list of goods covered.  There is, however, no provision for cancelling some owners whilst leaving others as registered owners.

The request to cancel the mark focuses on a lack of usage by D.I.L. Trade (Maglan) Ltd, and the investigator did not attempt to determine whether or not Capital Food Company Ltd was using the mark. Mr Farber testified that the owners were not using the mark, but Capital Food Company ltd themselves claimed usage in recent years but did not substantiate this with any evidence. Furthermore, Capital Food Company ltd transferred their share in the mark to Vinex Preslav, leaving the fate of the mark with the Commissioner, and without making any demands themselves.

The net effect of this is that the request is really one of correcting the register by deleting D.I.L. Trade (Maglan) Ltd as an owner. Section 38(a) of the ordinance states:

38(a) Subject to the provisions of this Ordinance, any person aggrieved by the non-insertion or omission from the Register without sufficient cause, or by any entry wrongly remaining on the Register, or by any error or defect in any entry in the Register, may make application in the prescribed manner to the Supreme Court or may, at his option, make such application in the first instance to the Registrar. 

The requester for correcting  the register is an aggrieved person and is covered by Section 38a). It has previously been established that an “aggrieved person” is no different from the “interested party” referred to in section 41 of the Ordinance (- see Seligsohn “Trademarks and Related Laws” 1973, page 105. The Supreme Court related to this in Civil Appeal 941/05 Wine Maker’s Cooperative of Rishon l’Zion and Zichron Yaacov  vs. The Kerem Company Ltd. p/d/ 61(3) where it is stated:

The phrase “he that is disadvantaged” is explained liberally in the case-law to include someone who suffers some disadvantage in some manner vis-a-vis some third-party who enjoys a trademark registration that they are not entitled to. This explanation is based on the English phrase “Aggrieved Person” as understood in the English Law that the  Ordinance brings into Israel Law.

 The requester for cancellation fulfils this precondition since, according to his statement, he’s used the mark in his home country for decades, has usage abroad and is interested in using the mark in Israel.

The Commissioner’s has wide authority in this regard, a previous commissioner ruled regarding Israel Trademark No. 66312 “NIPRO” in Abbott laboratories vs. Nissho Corporation 13 July 1999:

Since Section 38 deals with various changes to the register, from cancellation due to lack of distinctiveness and including transfer of rights in a mark from one entity to another, the considerations behind allowing amendments depends on the underlying justification and on the scope of amendment requested. There are cases where a Section 38 amendment will be allowed and others where it will not.

This is demonstrated by the fact that the legislators limited the period under which a mark may be cancelled due to non-registerability, but did not limit the period during which the register could be amended (see section 39(a1) of the Ordinance, and also the words of explanation (published on 27 July 1999 Page 525 in the protocols of the Law for amending Intellectual Property legislation in light of the TRIPS agreement 1999, Book of Laws 1721 from 30 December 1999, Page 48, which resulted in this section being added to the Ordinance.

Nevertheless, when considering a request to amend the register, it is necessary to consider the rights of third parties that could be disadvantaged by the amendment. Such third parties are not merely the parties themselves, but include competitors who if the amendment is not allowed, could file for cancellation of the mark due to lack of use.

Furthermore, the requester of the cancellation wishes to be registered as the user themselves, after testifying that the mark is not actually in use. The correct procedure is to have the non-sued mark cancelled and then to file a new application. The new application is then open to third-party challenges by way of opposition and allows other parties, their say.

Additionally, if the mark is indeed dormant for so long, this increases the likelihood that other parties may be using the mark and assigning the mark in this manner could leave such other parties exposed to infringement actions.

Thus even if the end result is that the requester of the cancellation be registered as the mark owner, this result should be achieved with consideration for the rights of others, and not by devious means.

In light of the above, Deputy Commissioner Ms Jaqueline Bracha rules as follows:

  1. The request to amend the register such that D.Y.L. Trade (Maglan) Ltd is replaced by Vinex Preslav as the owner is not acceptable
  2. If Vinex Preslav wishes to continue with the cancellation request, they have 30 days to show lack of use of both owners. Since Capital Food Company Ltd. have stated that they will not be submitting evidence themselves, the decision will issue based on the submission by Vinex Preslav only
  3. Vinex Preslav may abandon the cancellation request within 30 days; the mark will remain owned by two parties and Vinex Preslav may substitute themselves for Capital Food Company Ltd as the part owner as per the transfer of ownership record that was submitted.

Cancellation or Change of Ownership of Israel Trademark No. 158991 “פליסקה, PLISKA, ПЛИСКА” (stylized) Ms Jaqueline Bracha, 22 August 2016

 

 

 


Sky Lights

February 18, 2016

Skypix

Sky Light (Shen Zhen) LTD filed International Trademark Registration Number 1196460 under Madrid, designating Israel among other countries. The mark is Skypix as shown above. The Israel Application No. is 264078.

The mark, covers computer peripheral devices; portable telephones; scanners (data processing equipment); video recorders; camcorders; cameras (photography); projection apparatus; telescopes; remote control apparatus for domestic use; battery chargers all in Class 9.

On 26 July 2015 the mark was allowed and published for opposition purposes. A notice to that effect was sent to the international Office at WIPO, noting that the deadline for oppositions was 30 October 2015.

On 26 October 2015, Sky International AG opposed the mark and the international Office at WIPO was informed and a copy of Sky International AG’s statement of case was sent to them.

The Applicant had two months, until 26 December 2015, to respond. However, no response or counter-statement was submitted.

Conseequently, under Section 24(e) of the Israel Trademark Ordinance 1972 Sky Light (Shen Zhen) LTD is considered as having abandoned their mark, and as per regulation 37 of the Trademark Ordinances 1940, they are considered as not disagreeing with the allegations made in Adidas’ Statement of Case. The Opposition is accepted and Israel Trademark File No. 264078  is considered closed.

The Israel Patent Office will inform WIPO of this decision.

 


WIPO To Make Two Stops in the Holyland

March 18, 2015

road show

WIPO, the World Intellectual Property Organization that is manages the PCT system for filing International patents and the Madrid Protocol for filing international trademarks has a team of roving lecturers who will be performing lecturing in Israel.

Concerts Seminars are scheduled for 13th April in Beer Sheva and for the 15th April in Haifa.

More details may be found here

The provisional program in Beer Sheva Park Carusso for Science, 79 Atzmaut Street, is as follows:

Monday, April 13, 2015

9.30 a.m. – 9.50 a.m. Opening Session

Welcome addresses by:
Mr. Asa Kling, Director, Israel Patent Office (ILPO)
Local industry\Chief Scientist\Politician TBD
Mr. Yoshiyuki Takagi, Assistant Director General, Global Infrastructure Sector (GIS), WIPO

9.50 a.m. – 10.10 a.m. Topic 1: The ILPO as WIPO’s cooperation partner and service provider for the users of the IP system

Speaker: Mr. Asa Kling, ILPO\

10.10 a.m. – 10.30 a.m. Topic 2: Introduction to WIPO
Development of the International Legal Framework
Major Intellectual Property Economic Studies

Speaker: Mr. Moshe Leimberg, Senior Program Officer, Section for Coordination of Developed countries, Department for Transition and Developed Countries (TDC), WIPO

10.30 a.m. – 10.45 a.m. Topic 3: The Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) –
Introduction and Future Developments

Speaker: Mr. Matthew Bryan, Director, PCT Legal Division, Patents and Technology Sector, (PTS), WIPO

10.45 a.m. – 11.00 a.m. The PCT – The actual practice (questions, experiences, discussion)

Moderator: Mr. Michael Bart, Head, PCT division, ILPO

Speakers: Mr. Matthew Bryan, WIPO

Additional speaker(s) Local practitioner(s) TBD

Questions and Answers

11.00 a.m. – 11.15 a.m. Coffee break

11.15 a.m. – 11.35 a.m. Topic 4: Global Intellectual Property Systems
The Madrid System for the International Registration of Marks
The Hague System for the International Registration of Industrial Designs

Speaker: Mrs. Debbie Roenning, Director, Legal Division, Madrid Registry, Brands and Designs Sector (BDS), WIPO

11.35 a.m. – 11.50 a.m. Global Intellectual Property Systems: The actual practice (questions, experiences, discussion)

Moderator: Ms. Anat Levi-Ne’eman, Head, Trademarks Division, ILPO

Speakers: Ms. Debbie Roenning, WIPO

Additional speaker(s) Local practitioner(s) TBD

Questions and Answers

11.50 a.m. – 12.10 p.m. Topic 5: WIPO’s Arbitration and Mediation Center

Speaker: Mr. Matthew Bryan, WIPO

12.10 p.m. – 12.40 p.m. Topic 6: Global Databases for Intellectual Property Platforms and Tools for the Connected Knowledge Economy, with an emphasis on WIPO Green and WIPO Re:Search

Speaker: Mr. Yoshiyuki Takagi, WIPO

12.40 p.m. – 1.00 p.m. Topic 7: WIPO digital copyright developments

Speaker: Mr. Paolo Lanteri, Legal Officer, Copyright Law Division, Culture and Creative Industries Sector, WIPO

1.00 p.m. – 1.30 p.m. CLOSING SESSION

Questions and Answers

1.30 p.m. – 2.30 p.m. Lunch break with specific Sessions (Patents, Trademarks, Databases, and Copyright)

2.30 p.m. – 3.00 p.m. Ceremony to present the ILPO prize for an academic thesis on various fields of IP

Presenter: Dr. Daniel Ben Oliel, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Haifa University

The Wednesday Program in Haifa will be held on Wednesday, April 15 2015 at the Technion in the Batler Hall, Neeman Centre, Technion:

9.00 a.m. – 9.20 a.m. Opening Session

Welcome addresses by:
Mr. Asa Kling, Director, Israel Patent Office (ILPO)
Local industry\Chief Scientist\Politician TBD
Mr. Yoshiyuki Takagi, Assistant Director General, Global Infrastructure Sector (GIS), WIPO

9.20 a.m. – 9.40 a.m. Topic 1: The ILPO as WIPO’s cooperation partner and service provider for the users of the IP system

Speaker: Mr. Asa Kling, ILPO

9.40 a.m. – 10.00 a.m. Topic 2: Introduction to WIPO
Development of the International Legal Framework
Major Intellectual Property Economic Studies

Speaker: Mr. Moshe Leimberg, Senior Program Officer, Section for Coordination of Developed countries, Department for Transition and Developed Countries (TDC), WIPO

10.00 a.m. – 10.15 a.m. Topic 3: The Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) –
Introduction and Future Developments

Speaker: Mr. Matthew Bryan, Director, PCT Legal Division, Patents and Technology Sector, (PTS), WIPO

10.15 a.m. – 10.35 a.m. The PCT – The actual practice (questions, experiences, discussion)

Moderator: Mr. Michael Bart, Head, PCT division, ILPO

Speakers: Mr. Matthew Bryan, WIPO

Additional speaker(s) Local practitioner(s) TBD

Questions and Answers

10.35 a.m. – 10.50 a.m. Coffee break

10.50 a.m. – 11.10 a.m. Topic 4: Global Intellectual Property Systems
The Madrid System for the International Registration of Marks
The Hague System for the International Registration of Industrial Designs

Speaker: Mrs. Debbie Roenning, Director, Legal Division, Madrid Registry, Brands and Designs Sector (BDS), WIPO

11.10 a.m. – 11.25 a.m. Global Intellectual Property Systems: The actual practice (questions, experiences, discussion)

Moderator: Ms. Anat Levi-Ne’eman, Head, Trademarks Division, ILPO

Speakers: Ms. Debbie Roenning, WIPO

Additional speaker(s) Local practitioner(s) TBD

Questions and Answers

11.25 a.m. – 11.45 a.m. Topic 5: WIPO’s Arbitration and Mediation Center

Speaker: Mr. Matthew Bryan, WIPO

11.45 a.m. – 12.15 p.m. Topic 6: Global Databases for Intellectual Property Platforms and Tools for the Connected Knowledge Economy, with an emphasis on WIPO Green and WIPO Re:Search

Speaker: Mr. Yoshiyuki Takagi, WIPO

12.15 p.m. – 12.35 p.m. Topic 7: WIPO digital copyright developments

Speaker: Mr. Paolo Lanteri, Legal Officer, Copyright Law Division, Culture and Creative Industries Sector, WIPO

12.35 p.m. – 1.00 p.m. CLOSING SESSION

Questions and Answers

1.00 p.m. – 2.00 p.m. Lunch break with specific Sessions (Patents, Trademarks, Databases, and Copyright)

COMMENTS

We suspect that this portends Israel joining the Hague System for the International Registration of Industrial Designs or some other design upheaval.

In general I applaud the idea of not doing every seminar in Tel Aviv or Jerusalem. However, the majority of practitioners to not live in Haifa or Beer Sheva. Why start these events at 9 am? Surely a 10 am kick-off would be more appropriate where people are traveling in?