Suspending a Patent Opposition Pending Examination of Divisional Application

August 12, 2018

janssen pharma.jpgApplication for patent IL 253468 to Janssen Pharmaceuticals is a divisional application of IL 206448, filed under Section 24 of the Law. The parent application is being opposed by TEVA.

TEVA has asked that the Opposition against the parent application be frozen for 18 months from when the Opposition was submitted, in accordance with Circular 020/2012 which regulates oppositions to allowed patents where there is a pending divisional application.

The Opposer claims that there is an overlap between the invention claimed in the parent and that claimed in the divisional.  Thus it is reasonable to assume that if an Opposition is filed against the Divisional application, similar factual and legal issues will arise, and the expert witnesses will likely be identical. Consequently, freezing the opposition to the parent application until the examination of the divisional application is completed will contribute to the efficiency of both the current proceeding and the expected future proceeding.

TEVA further claims that if the current opposition is not frozen, the Applicant will obtain an advantage since he can manipulate the prosecution process of the divisional application in response to issues revealed in the Opposition process of the parent.

The Applicant does not consider it appropriate to freeze the procedure. Nevertheless, they agree that conclusions reached in the Opposition to the allowed parent application will apply to the divisional application if the Opposer should file an opposition against it. The Applicant considers that this agreement makes freezing the Opposition unnecessary, since if an opposition is filed against the divisional, the findings of the present opposition will apply to it, and this makes the process efficient.

Discussion

The Commissioner thinks that on the grounds of efficiency, the request to freeze the Opposition proceedings should be accepted. As explained in the ruling concerning the Opposition to IL 195030 Teva Pharmaceuticals ltd vs. Boehringer Ingelheim International GMBH, 28 January 2002, paragraph 3 of the ruling:

The authority of the courts to delay a proceeding whilst a different proceeding occurs, raises similar issues that are not contentious. These issues are authority to do so, and discretion, which are applied to ensure efficiency of the proceeding, efficiency of the legal system, saving time and resources, preventing conflicting decisions from issuing, convenience for the parties, fast resolution, balance of convenience and the like. These are true, not only when the parties in the two proceedings are identical, but also when there are different parties but similar issues, similar legal considerations, and the interests to be considered are identical.

In this instance, the parties concur that there is a similarity between the inventions in question. In this case, if an opposition would eventually be filed against the divisional application, it is indeed likely that the similar issues will be raised, similar witnesses will be required to testify and the prior art will be the same in the two proceedings.

The Applicant’s consent that findings in the parent opposition be applied to the divisional, does not adequately address these issues. From a practical perspective, it is unreasonable to make a determination concerning the parent opposition before an opposition is filed in the divisional.

Such a situation would create a state of affairs wherein it is necessary to manage two proceedings with similar witnesses and experts, and similar issues will be considered, or that either the opposition in the divisional case be suspended until the issues are determined in the parent case, or the opposition in the parent case be suspended until the issues are determined in the divisional case or the cases are combined.

Furthermore, even if even various determinations are made in the parent case, it will be appreciated that the parent and the divisional will not have identical claims, and so uncertainty will arise as to whether conclusions from the parent case can be applied to the divisional, and what is the decision in similar but not identical matters to those raised in the parent case.

The commissioner rejects the Opposer’s claim that freezing the opposition is essential to prevent the applicant from applying lessons from the Opposition to the prosecution of the divisional application. Whilst there is some truth in this, it is insufficient, in and of itself, to justify freezing an opposition proceeding. It will be remembered that the Opposer can oppose the divisional application and in that framework, issues relating to the patentability of the divisional application will be considered.

In light of the above, the Commissioner rules that the Opposition proceeding to the parent application be suspended for 18 months from when it was filed, i.e. until 29 September 2019.

The Secretariat of the Patent Office will ensure that the Examiner of the divisional application is aware that there is an opposition against the parent case, and that the divisional application should ,therefore, be examined in accordance with Circular 020/2012.

No costs are awarded at this stage.

Interim ruling regarding suspension of an Opposition to a parent application pending examination of a divisional application, in re IL 206448 to Jenssen, opposed by Teva, ruling by Commsioner Ofer Alon, 19 June 2018.


Amending the Statement of Case to Hone Arguments

August 8, 2018

This interim ruling addresses the issue of amending the Statement of Case in Opposition proceedings before the Israel Patent Office.

IL 209734 to G Patel titled “A monitoring system based on etching of metals” was allowed and published for Opposition purposes.

Freshpoint Quality Assurance Inc. opposed the patent, and after the Applicant submitted their counter statement, Freshpoint requested permission to amend their statement of case.  They justified this request on the basis of the Applicant adding new details. They further argued that some of the amendments were necessary due to admissions of the Applicant in the counter-statement of case, and some were required to focus issues after the specification was twice amended following submission of the Opposition.

The Applicant considers that allowing Freshpoint to amend their statement of case would allow them to improve their position, and this would be financially difficult for him, as a private individual.  Patel further alleged that the amendment did not result from the additional details that he submitted, which should be considered as part of the proceeding and could be addressed in the evidence stage.

The Opposer related to the case-law and alleged that amendments to the Statement-of-case should be generously and liberally allowed.

In general, the Application relates to a system of control based on etching away metal of a two layer system, to provide an indication of time, temperature, humidity and so on.

The Application is a national phase entry into Israel of a PCT application that claims priority from a number of US provisional applications submitted between 3 June 2008 and 2 May 2009. The Israel application was allowed on published for opposition purposes on 31 May 2016 and the opposition was submitted on 30 August 2016.

After the Opposer submitted their statement of case, the Applicant requested permission to amend the specification. The parties agreed that the amendments should follow Regulation 102vi of the Patent Regulations 1968.

Following this agreement, the Opposer submitted an amended statement of case and the applicant again requested to amend the specification, but this time only amended the dependent claims. The Opposer considered that this amendment was not sufficiently justified and contravened Regulation 95 and should be struck. In a ruling of 28 September 2017, the Deputy Commissioner Ms Jacqueline Bracha rejected the request for the amendment to be canceled and when the Opposer stated that they would not be amending their statement-of-case, she ordered the Applicant to file his counter-statement. The second amendment followed the procedure set out in Regulation 102vi of the regulations.

One the Applicant submitted his statement of case, the Opposer requested that additional details regarding the denial in paragraph 25 of the Applicant’s statement of case. These paragraph related to the Applicant’s response to the  Opposer’s contention that the phrase “destructible barrier layer” that appears in the claims is not supported in the priority applications. The Applicant responded, but the Opposer requested interim costs, and that a schedule be set for submission of the evidence. In an interim ruling of 10 April 2018,  costs were awarded and a date for the Opposer to submit their evidence was set.

Instead of submitting their evidence, the Opposer has requested to amend their statement of case.

Discussion

The guiding principle for amending the statement of case before the Patent Office is that unless there are reasons to refuse the request, amending the statement of Case will be allowed, so long as it focuses the discussion on the issues that the parties disagree on. The reasons for not allowing amendments to the Statement of Case are also given:

This court has the authority to allow amendments to the Statement of Case in cases that the amendments relate to the issues that are really disputed by the parties, and where there is no reason NOT to allow the amendment. Such reasons (for not allowing amendments) include inequitable behavior on behalf of the party requesting the amendment, adversely affecting the rights of the opposing party in a manner that cannot be compensated for by a cost ruling, and tardiness in requesting the amendment (see the Request to cancel patent no. IL 154398 (request to correct the statement of case and evidence) Logo Engineering Development ltd vs. State of Israel, 29 April 2012. Furthermore, when exercising the authority, the court should consider the stage that the proceeding has reached, since the Opposition proceeding itself is a barrier to the Applicant obtaining the patent.

(Opposition to Patent 187923 (request to amend the statement of case) Pimi Aggro Clinic ltd vs. Xeda International, 19 May 2013).

In contradistinction to most of the cases  where amendments to the Statement of Case have been requested, here the Opposer does not wish to rely on additional publications that were missed in the search for prior art prior to filing the original statement of case.

As the Opposer claims, in this instance, the amendments are by way of honing the claims. The Deputy Commissioner, Ms  Jacqueline Bracha does not consider that these sharpening of arguments are necessary at this stage of the proceedings, since the honing and polishing of arguments that are not new arguments, may be done at the evidence stage.

Furthermore, the Deputy Commissioner accepts the Applicant’s arguments that many of the requested amendments are actually a “Response”, as they relate to the Applicant’s statement of case. This is evidenced by the many references in the amended Statement of Case of the Opposer to the Applicant’s Statement of Case. The Statement of Response that the Opposer is entitled to submit under Regulation 61 of the Civil Procedure Regulations 1984 is not the Statement of case that the Opposer is allowed to submit in an Opposition before the Commissioner of Patents. Furthermore, it is clear that there is no place for these amendments, since if the amendment to the Statement of Case is authorized, the  Applicant will have the right to File an Amended Statement of Case in response and previously submitted statement of case will no longer represent the points of contention.

In this instance, the parties concur that the amended Statement of Case does raise issues not previously raised or widens the claims raised in the following instances:

  • The invention does not deserve priority since the element in claim 1 that is “capable of providing an induction period which is measured by a delay in a visual indication of the destruction of the metal or metal alloy indicator” only appears in this format for the first time in the seventh application from 12 May 2009.
  • The claimed invention is directed to a new property of a known product (chapter 7 of the new Statement of Claims.
  • The invention has no utility (chapter 8 of the new statement of claims.

The claim that the invention is not entitled to an earlier priority date was in the previous Statement of Case, but based on a different reason. The current basis is, according to the Opposer, a result of the Statement of Case in Response by the Applicant, which added new subject matter. The Deputy Commissioner accepts the Applicant’s contention that the Opposer forwent his right to amend his Statement of Case following the second amendment to the specification, and so the request to now amend the Statement of Case is tardy. Furthermore, the element that allegedly is not entitled to the priority date, was already part of the claims when the Statement of Case was first amended, and so the Opposer had an earlier opportunity to challenge it.

As to the claim that the invention lacks utility,  this is based on Fig. 39 of the Application which measures the induction period which was found in the Application prior to the amendment. However, according to the Opposer, were the so called “barrier layer” that is shown in Fig. 3 of the first priority document, which the Applicant relates to in their Response to the request for more details, then that period cannot be measured, and so the invention lacks utility. In other words, from the Applicant referring to Fig. 3, the Opposer concludes both that the Application relates to a new property of a known substance, and that it lacks utility.  From here, it appears that there is a connection between the addition of chapters 7 and 8 to the Statement of Case that relates to the utility of the invention, and the determination of the new property of the known material, and the Applicant’s response to the request for additional information.

 

In light of the above, the Deputy Commissioner accepts the Opposer’s contention that these issues could not have reasonably been submitted earlier.

 

In conclusion, parts 7 and 8 of the Statement of Claims result from the response to the request for more information, do focus the discussion on the contended issues and their submission is allowed.

 

The other requests to amend the Specification are refused. The references to “agreement by the Applicant” in the Statement of Case is really a Statement in Response, and so cannot be considered as amendments to the Statement of Case designed to emphasize the points of dispute between the parties. Amendments that are honing of arguments that relate to prior art previously referenced in the Opposer’s Statement of Case, are not necessary to establish the points of contention, and their place is in the evidence and summations. Amendments due to changes in numbering and deletion of claims can help to understand the Statement of Claims and could be submitted, but it should have been done after the second amendment to the specification. Incorporating them at this stage would require the Applicant to amend his Statement of Case and would result in unnecessary expense.

 

In light of the above

 

The Opposer will submit their Statement of Case amended as per above, i.e. with the addition of chapters  7 and 8 only. The amended Statement of Case will be submitted within 7 days.

 

The Applicant will be allowed to amend his Statement of Case by relating to the new Chapters 7 and 8. It is stressed that further amendments to the Statements of Case will only be allowed with explicit authorization, after submitting a detailed requested to amend the Statement of Case. In light of the limited amendment that the Opposer is allowed to make at this time, the Applicant will have 7 days to file their Amended Statement of Case from the submission of the Opposer’s amended Statement of Case.

Any request for extensions that result from Office pressures, festivals, bank holidays, vacations in Israel or abroad or from the need to the coordinate between the various entities, will not be allowed.

 

Since some of the amendments have been allowed and some have been rejected, no costs are awarded at this stage.
Interim ruling re Request to amend the Opposer’s Statement of Case in Israel Patent Application IL 209734 , by Deputy Commissioner Bracha, 11 June 2018.  

 

 


Opposition to IL 190827 to Pfizer – A request to delete paragraphs from Expert Opinion as Widening Front of Attack

August 8, 2018

In evidence submissions, parties can support contentions made in statements of case, but are not allowed to widen their position by introducing new matter. When evidence relating to allegedly new issues is submitted by an Opposer, the Applicant can be expected to oppose the submission. Opposition proceedings are typically characterized by skirmishes regarding the admissibility of evidence, that are discussed in interim rulings. This is one such ruling.

Opposition to IL 190827 to Pfizer

Lyrica

IL 190827 to Pfizer relates to a pharmaceutical composition prescribed for once a day dosage comprising Pregablin and a matrix forming agent of PVP or PVA and CPVP as a swelling agent.

Teva opposed the patent.

This interim ruling relates to a request by Pfizer to remove paragraphs 13-15, 16, 94, 105 and 130 from the Opposer’s Counter-Evidence in Response of Professor Golomb, acting as an expert witness for Teva.

Pfizer claimed that paragraphs 13-15 of the Opposer’s Counter-Evidence in Response stress gelling agents which are not mentioned on the Opposition or in Professor Golomb’s main Opinion. In paragraph 15 of the Opposer’s Counter-Evidence in Response, Professor Golomb alleges that selective reporting on stability, swelling and hardness is arbitrary and they claim that these paragraphs should be struck as they were not submitted in answer to anything in their response.

Pfizer alleged that Paragraph 16 of Teva’s Counter-Evidence in Response raises issues not previously raised: that there is no comparison between the claimed invention and known formulations and no indication of any advantage thereover.
Pfizer requested that paragraph 94 be struck since it makes allegations not found in the original evidence submission. Similarly, paragraphs 105 of the Opposer’s Counter-Evidence in Response relates to Cmin values in the simulation summarized in table 15, and paragraph 130 thereof, are not by way of response and should be struck from the record.
Teva responded that the request to have these paragraphs in their Opposer’s Counter-Evidence in Response cancelled was submitted for improper reasons. Paragraphs 13 and 15 are supported by the patent application itself and do not raise new subject matter. They come in response to paragraph 9 of Dr. Tomber’s opinion. That mentioned in paragraph 15 regarding swelling, stability and harness comes in direct response to Dr. Tomber’s claim that these characteristics are advantageous. The claim that this is an advantage of the claimed invention was first raised in Dr. Tomber’s opinion as expert witness of the Applicant and so the first opportunity for the Opposer to refute this allegation is in their Counter-Evidence in Response.
Teva further submitted that Section 16, when read in context, is a response to Dr. Tomber’s claim that there is an advantage in the claimed formulation of the application. Professor Golomb considers that without comparison to other formulations, one cannot claim the present invention provides an advantage thereover. Similarly that stated in Section 95 of the opinion; that the application does not provide stability data, comes in response to Dr. Tomber’s claims regarding the efficacy of the formulation. The Opposer adds that the application and the Applicant’s claims in the Statement of Case do not relate to any advantage provided by the swelling or the hardness.
Section 105 deals with the Cmin value in table 15 and comes in response to Dr. Tomber’s claim that tablets having a 6 hour release window are not appropriate for once-a-day dosage. Teva claims that when reading this paragraph in the Opposer’s Counter-Evidence in Response together with the previous paragraphs one can only conclude that they come in response to Dr. Tomber’s claim.

As to paragraph 130, the Opposer claims that the expert opinion cited comes in response to the Applicant’s claim that formulation is resistant to the compaction pressure which is based on experimental evidence first submitted by Dr. Tomber.

The Applicant considers that the Opposer’s Counter-Evidence in Response was not a fair response to their counter statement of case and the Opposer allegations that Dr. Tomber’s statements went further than required to respond to the Opposition, whereas the Applicant claims that Professor Golomb simply expanded on statements made in the original Opposition, that could have been made in the original opposition.

Discussion

The parties are in no disagreement regarding the Law, but only in how it should be applied in this instance. Consequently, the relevant case law regarding the application of Regulation 62 is only summarized briefly.

This regulation orders that evidence in response must fulfill one of the following conditions: They should relate to the issues that are specifically denied by the Applicant in their counter-evidence, or are raised for the first time in their counter-evidence. In the response to the Applicant’s evidence, the Opposer may not submit evidence that should have been part of their main submission of evidence (See Opposition to IL 178141 Unipharm vs. Bristol Myers Squibb Company, 12 January 2015 following the ruling of the then Deputy Commissioner in the opposition to IL 127833 Teva vs. Abbott, 12 February 2007 (Oppositions to IL 177724 and 205606, request to delete sections from the Opposer’s Counter-Evidence in Response DSM IP Assets B.V. vs. Refine Technology LLC, 16 March 2015).  

The Deputy Commissioner, Ms Jacqueline Bracha considers that, on examining the paragraphs in question, Pfizer’s request to have them struck from Teva’s Counter-Evidence in Response should be rejected.

In Paragraphs 13 and 14 of the Opposer’s Counter-Evidence in Response, Professor Golomb relates to Dr. Tomber’s examples. Most of the criticism is directed to Dr. Tomber not relating to the fact that the examples include additional ingredients that are not claimed, and which could affect the release of the active ingredients.

In paragraph 15 of the Opposer’s Counter-Evidence in Response, Professor Golomb alleges that there is nothing in Dr. Tomber’s Opinion to explain why examples 24, 25 and 40 of the Application were chosen to show stability, swelling and hardness of the formulations claimed. Professor Golomb further claims that the Opinion does not relate to the other components of the examples, apart from those that are likely to affect the hardness and swelling of the tablets. The additional components are defined in the specification as gelling agents. From this, Professor Golomb deduces that the chosen examples do not exemplify formulations that only include the elements of claim 1.

In these examples, Professor Golomb relates to things mentioned in Dr. Tomber’s opinion. However, this is not a new issue first raised in the Response Opinion. In fact, a similar statement to that of paragraph 15 of the Response Opinion is found in paragraph 81-83 of Professor Golomb’s first opinion where he explains why, in his opinion, none of the Examples of the patent match that claimed. The difference is the switching of the words “additional assistive materials” in the first Opinion, with the phrase “gelling agents” in the second opinion. Professor Golomb also explains in paragraph 15 of the Opinion that the additional materials are defined as “gelling agents” in the patent application itself.

From that stated, it is clear that paragraphs 13-15 of the Response Opinion do not raise any new issue but rather come in response to that said previously, and so the request to delete these paragraphs is rejected.

In paragraph 16 of the Response Opinion, Professor Golomb relates to the claim in Dr. Tomber’s Opinion, that the claimed invention is advantageous in terms of stability, swelling and hardness of the tablets as compared to those formulated by the standard methods for obtaining delayed release in the stomach that is described in example 29. In the Opinion of the expert, the comparative data provided is insufficient to prove this advantage. The Applicant claims that Dr. Tomber did not make this claim and so this response comes to reject a claim not made.

Examination of Dr. Tomber’s Opinion shows that in part 9.4 of his Opinion, the expert relates to example 29 of the Application as a comparative example. Dr. Tomber explains that the release of the active ingredient in example 29 after 12 hours is 65%, compared to 80% for formulations of the invention, and so some of the active ingredient in the formulation of example 29 is wasted. It appears that paragraph 16 of the Opinion is an attempt to respond to this contention of Dr. Tomber and is thus a response to an issue raised by the Applicant. To the extent that the Applicant considers that Dr. Tomber’s opinion was not properly understood by the Opposer, they can relate to the alleged misunderstanding in cross-examination. In light of this, the request to delete paragraph 16 is rejected.

Paragraph 94 of the Opinion in Response by Professor Golomb raised the issue that Examples 15-23 which look at Lactam formation over time does not indicate the efficiency of the claimed formulation. In this paragraph, Professor Golomb responds to Dr. Tomber’s claim that was raised in paragraph 30 of his opinion, that “the results demonstrate the efficacy of the claimed invention.” Dr. Tomber continues that the examples show the efficacy of the invention under various conditions. In Paragraph 95, Professor Golomb adds that the Application lacks stability data for Example 29 which also does not include all the elements of the invention. According to Professor Golomb, without stability data, Example 29 cannot be used for comparative purposes as Dr. Tomber had suggested in Section 9.4 of his Opinion. The Deputy Commissioner does not think that Paragraph 95 goes beyond the issues under discussion, since it specifically relates to Dr. Tomber’s Opinion which related to Professor Golomb’s original Opinion. In light of this, the request to cancel section 95 is refused.

In paragraph 104 of the Expert Opinion in Response, Professor Golomb summarizes that stated in paragraph 32 of Dr. Tomber’s opinion regarding adapting the formulation for once-a-day dosage, with reference to the release duration and the amount of active ingredient in the blood over the period of release by the tablet. In paragraph 105, Professor Golomb explains why he disagrees with that stated by Dr. Tomber in Paragraph 32 of his opinion, and supports this with reference to publications cited in his original Opinion. This is sufficient to show that Paragraph 105 of the Response Opinion relates to matters raised by the Applicant and is in accordance with Regulation 62 of the Patent Regulations.

In paragraph 104 of the Expert Opinion in Response, Professor Golomb summarizes that stated in paragraph 32 of Dr. Tomber’s opinion regarding adapting the formulation for once-a-day dosage, with reference to the release duration and the amount of active ingredient in the blood over the period of release by the tablet. In paragraph 105, Professor Golomb explains why he disagrees with that stated by Dr. Tomber in Paragraph 32 of his opinion, and supports this with reference to publications cited in his original Opinion. This is sufficient to show that Paragraph 105 of the Response Opinion relates to matters raised by the Applicant and is in accordance with Regulation 62 of the Patent Regulations.

In Section 130 of the Response Opinion, Professor Golomb claims that the Application emphasizes the wear data and hardness of the formulation as ways to optimize the release rate of the active ingredient, but he disagrees that the evidence supports this contention. Here again, the Deputy Commissioner accepts the Opposer’s argument that this paragraph comes in response to Dr. Tomber’s statement in paragraph 26 of his Opinion, that CPVP manufacturing provides a significant advantage. In fact, Dr. Tomber dedicated a number of paragraphs to the stability of the tablets, and so the Deputy Commissioner does not consider that Paragraph 130 goes beyond Regulation 62 of the Patent Regulations.

In Section 130 of the Response Opinion, Professor Golomb claims that the Application emphasizes the wear data and hardness of the formulation as ways to optimize the release rate of the active ingredient, but he disagrees that the evidence supports this contention. Here again, the Deputy Commissioner accepts the Opposer’s argument that this paragraph comes in response to Dr. Tomber’s statement in paragraph 26 of his Opinion, that CPVP manufacturing provides a significant advantage. In fact, Dr. Tomber dedicated a number of paragraphs to the stability of the tablets, and so the Deputy Commissioner does not consider that Paragraph 130 goes beyond Regulation 62 of the Patent Regulations.

In light of this, the request to cancel the various paragraphs is refused.

Since the parties informed the Patent Office a few days ago that they are negotiating a way to end this Opposition procedure, no costs are awarded at this time.

Interim ruling re admissibility of various paragraphs in a Response by Opposer to Applicant’s Opinion concerning IL 190827 to Pfizer, opposed by Teva, ruling by Deputy Commissioner Jacqueline Bracha,  6 June 2018.     


The three month Trademark Opposition period is calculated from the day it starts

July 31, 2018

288045

The three month Trademark Opposition period is calculated from the day it starts

On 3rd June 2018, Israel Trademark Number 288045 to R & S Food Import Export published as issued. The mark is shown alongside.

Barilla Ger Fratelli requested that their trademark opposition submitted on 30 May 2018 be considered.

deadlineThe Israel Trademark Department considered that the final date for opposing the mark was 28 May 2018, three months after the mark published for opposition purposes on 28 February 2018. Furthermore, the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks does not have the authority to extend the deadline for filing oppositions. So the Opposition submitted on 30 May 2018 was not considered as being timely filed and was ignored.

BarillaBarilla Ger Fratelli, represented by Dr. Shlomo Cohen Law Offices argued that the deadline for filing the opposition was the end of May, and they had until 31 May 2018, so the opposition was timely filed. To support their contention, Barilla’s representatives referred to Section 10b of the Law of Legal Interpretation 5641 and argued that Patent Office Circular M.G. 46 titled “Calculating Deadlines provided in Months or Years” contradicts the law and adversely affects Barilla’s rights. Barilla’s legal representatives claimed that the Opposition was filed after they had consulted with the trademark department and appended an Affidavit of Adv. Talia Punchick, a former employee of Dr. Shlomo Cohen Law Offices.

Section 24a of the Trademark Ordinance 1972 states:

Within three months of the date of publication, anybody can submit an Opposition to a trademark issuing.

Section 23 states that:

If a trademark application is accepted, whether as filed or with limitations, the Commissioner will publicize in the determined manner, that the mark was accepted and any limitations applied.

The date that the mark published under Section 23 for opposition purposes, was 28 February 2018. Since the period for submitting an Opposition is three months from 28 February 2018, and under the Section reproduced above, the final date for submitting Oppositions is 28 May 2018. This is the date required by Section 10b of the Law of Legal Interpretation which states:

A period provided as a number of months or years after a specific event will end on the final month on the day having the same date as the event, and if that month does not have that day, on the last day of the month.

Barilla’s representative’s claim is surprising, as if this law reduces the period given in the law, since the months provided for the opposition (March, April and May) that were at Barilla’s disposal, are all full months. Barilla chose not to take advantage of this time period.

Beyond that required, it is noted that the final date for submitting the opposition, i.e. 28 May 2018, was noted in the publication of the notice of allowance in the journal and also on the second page of the journal itself.

To remove any doubt, it is noted that Section 10(a) of the Law of Legal Interpretation which states that where a period is provided in days or weeks, the day that the period starts is not included in the calculation is not relevant to the present case, since it relates to days and weeks and not to a number of months, unlike Section 24(a) of the [Trademark] Ordinance. Thus the claim that the number of months starts from the 1 March 2018 (and should therefore finish on 1 June 2018), rather than starting on 28 February and finishing on 28 May is groundless.

This conclusion would be changed if, for example, an allowance was published on 30 November of some year, and thus the final day does not exist since February has only 28 (or 29 days). In such a case, the deadline would be 1 March.

In light of the above, the example given in Circular M.G. 46 is correct, and the final date for publishing an opposition to something that publishes on 28 February is 28 May.

There is no request to extend the Opposition period, which in any event is not within something that the Commissioner of Patents has the authority to do as is evidenced in a long list of Patent Office decisions. Commissioner Ofir Alon’s ruling in the request for extending the Opposition period in re Israel TM Application number 283942 Mindspace ltd vs Merkspace Europe BV from 28 June 2017:

As explained in the Decision of then adjudicator of IP concerning the Opposition to Israel Trademark Application Numbers 182779 and 182780 for stylized marks to Baltika Breweries vs. S & G Intertrade ltd from 5 November 2006:

Retroactive extensions of opposition periods is what Section 7 of the fifth amendment to the Ordinance was designed to prevent, as can be learned from the words of explanation of the Proposed Law 34 from 16 June 2003, on page 492:

It is proposed to cancel the Commissioner’s authority to extend the Opposition period. This step is intended to increase the efficiency of the consideration of the registerability of trademarks.  

Similarly, see for example, the decision regarding the Request to extend the Opposition for Israel Trademark Application Number 245038 Dynasoi Elastomeros, SA de CV bs. SK Global Chemical Co. Ltd, from3 October 2013.

From examination of the Opposition file, it transpires that a notice of the untimely filing of the trademark Opposition was sent to Barilla’s representatives on 30 May 2018, immediately after the opposition was filed. The Adjudicator does not accept that the opposition was submitted after consulting with the Trademark Department. The Affidavit by the attorney states that the matter was told to her to the best of her knowledge. No details of when and how the alleged conversation was supposed to have taken place are provided, the identity of the Examiner who allegedly gave the wrong advice is not provided. Nor are the exact contents of the alleged conversation. Due to this lack of clarity, the Adjudicator is unable to rely on this affidavit to support Barilla’s contention. Anyway, the Law itself over-rides any other guidance. Any attorney, and particularly one with trademark expertise, is expected to refer to and rely on the Law and not on vague guidance to the extent that such existed.

It is noted that Barilla still has legal options, and can request that the mark be cancelled under Sections 38 or 29 of the Ordinance. In such a cancellation proceedings, all their arguments and contentions will be fully considered.

The request for accepting the Opposition as timely filed is refused.

Decision by Ms Yaara Shoshani Caspi re Barilla’s Opposition to Israel Trademark No. 288045 to  to R & S Food Import Export.   

COMMENT

This is not the first time that the Patent Office has ruled that the three month trademark opposition period is not extendible. See here for another example.


Can Non-Israelis be Subpoenaed to testify in Opposition Proceedings?

June 10, 2018

novartis

Israel Patent Application No. 176831 to Novartis is titled “COMPRESSED PHARMACEUTICAL TABLETS OR DIRECT COMPRESSION PHARMACEUTICAL TABLETS COMPRISING DPP-IV INHIBITOR CONTAINING PARTICLES AND PROCESSES FOR THEIR PREPARATION”. It is the national phase entry of PCT/EP2005/000400.

Unipharm

On allowance, Unipharm filed an Opposition to the patent application being granted.  Within the Opposition proceeding, Unipharm, who for this case, have dispensed with the services of Adv. Adi Levit, their legal counsel and have been handling the Opposition unaided by attorneys, have requested that the Israel Patent Office subpoena  John Hutchinson and Mr Kowalski, workers at Novartis to give testimony.

This request follows an earlier request to reveal documentation regarding testing that was appended to the Expert Witness testimony of Professor Davies, Novartis’ expert witness, which was ordered in an earlier interim ruling of 3 January 2018.

Discovery

In response to the discovery request, Novartis submitted an Affidavit with various appended papers. In light of this, Unipharm now alleges that the Affidavit implies that Novartis has not revealed all documents it should have. Unipharm further indicates that the explanation proffered by Hutchinson, who is signed on the Affidavit, “appears to be odd”. Therefore, Unipharm wish to Subpoena him to cross-examine him on this.

lab bookUnipharm further claims that a document titled “Certificate of Authenticity” was included with respect to the laboratory notebook, parts of which were included in the appendices attached to the affidavit. According to Unipharm, Mr Kowalski, who was one of the named inventors, is signed on this document. Consequently, Unipharm requested to cross-examine him as well.

Novartis requests that Unipharm’s request be rejected. They claim that the Commissioner does not have the authority to subpoena witnesses not within the judicial territory of the State of Israel, who are not direct parties in a proceeding. Novartis also notes that Mr Hutchinson’s signature on the Affidavit accompanying the discovery documents was done in the framework of his employment as a patent attorney in the Legal Department of Novartis. Novartis claims that ALL information regarding the management of the proceeding is subject to legal confidentiality and may also be considered as being a trade-secret.

As to Mr Kowalski, he never signed an Affidavit of Evidence in the process and is not a party to it. Similarly Novartis claims that Unipharm has not stated why they need to cross-examine that inventor who was one of three named inventors.

Discussion

The witnesses that the Opposer wished to interrogate are beyond the territorial jurisdiction of Israel and are not parties in the case. Thus the Applicant is correct that Section 163b of the Patent Law 1967 that Unipharm referred to is not a legal basis for their being subpoenaed. The references that Unipharm related to in their request, dealt with witnesses that gave Affidavits or expert witness testimony, and thus could be subpoenaed for cross-examination purposes.

A party that wishes to subpoena a citizen or foreign resident to testify must do so under the International Inter-State Legal Assistance Law 1998. See Appeal 3810/06 Dori and Zacovsky Building and Investments Ltd vs. Shamai Goldstein, paragraph 17, 24 September 2007.

Section 47 of the Legal Assistance Law states:

The Authority is allowed to request from another country, that testimony be collected, including that physical evidence be transferred for display in Israel, if the court allows that the evidence is required to hold the trial in Israel; regarding this law, and where the case is pending, the term court refers to the tribunal that is hearing the case.

From the wording of this Section, it transpires that the court will open a proceeding to summon foreign witnesses to a hearing only if it is convinced that their testimony is necessary to conduct the proceeding. In this instance, the Commissioner considers that there is significant doubt as to whether the presence of the witnesses for cross-examination purposes is really required.

Unipharm has requested to cross-examination Mr Kowalski regarding an Affidavit for discovery that he is signed on. The purpose of the discovery process is to enable the main proceeding to be handled efficiently; legal proceedings with face-up cards where each party knows what documents the other parties hold to prevent surprises at the hearing. By this means, unexpected delays are prevented, allowing the court to reveal the truth. Appeal 4235/05 Bank Mizrachi United vs. Ronit Peletz, 14 August 2015.

Opposite the principle of discovery, there are other interests such as efficiency of the court proceeding, defense of the legitimate interests of the party revealing documents, and preventing damage to the interests of third parties – See Appeal 2534/02 Yehuda Shimshon vs. Bank HaPoalim ltd. p.d. 56(5) 193. So the case-law has ruled more than once that it will not allow cross-examination of affidavits of this kind, if they are properly presented (see Appeal 2376/13 Rami Levy Shikma Marketing Ltd vs. Moshe Dagan 8 July 2014, and Zusman Civil Procedures 7th Edition, page 436.

This general rule has two exceptions: The first is that where reading of the Affidavit alone or with reference to its citations, that the Affidavit is defective, the court can order the party revealing documents to file a further Affidavit. Second, where the issue of confidentiality is used, the court can examine the document and decide if this claim is reasonable (see for example, Appeal 240/73 Baruch Vilker vs. Dov Tishler, 205, 2 December 1971 and Appeal 6823/05 Abraham Roimi vs. Bank Leumi of Israel, 12 January 2016.

In this instance, Unipharm did not append an Affidavit, detail or justify why they considered that the current case is one of these exceptions. Thus the Commissioner cannot rule that this is the case, and so the request is rejected.

As to the evidence of Mr Kowalski, Unipharm did not claim that there was any connection between the documents appended to the Affidavit of the Discovery and to the experiments that were appended to Novartis’ evidence, which was the basis of the original discovery request. Note, Mr Kowalski’s signature is only on the Certificate of Authenticity taken from the lab-book that was appended to some pages therefrom that were submitted in the discovery documents. In these circumstances, it is not clear what value Mr Kowalski’s testimony has, even were he to be subpoenaed.

In light of this, the Commissioner does not consider that the requirements of Section 47 of the Law of Legal Assistance are fulfilled with regard to Mr Hutchinson or Mr Kowalski.

The Request is refused. Unipharm will cover Novartis’ costs and their legal expenses to the tune of 2000 Shekels + VAT. These costs will be paid within 30 days.

Interim Ruling in Opposition to IL 175831 Ofer Alon, 30 April 2018.

Comment

It is possible that Mr Tomer has indeed bitten off more than he can chew by handling legal issues procedural issues such as requesting subpoenaing witnesses without legal counsel. However, the costs ruled against him are trivial when considering the issue in question. The Unipharm’s Expert Witness cannot testify to things that he does not know such as what else was in the lab-book, and in Opposition proceedings there is no assumption of validity of the patent. Thus it would be premature to write this request off as a strategic or even a tactical error.


Shuka – A Trademark Parody

April 22, 2018

Shoka 1Shuka is a fictitious insurance broker used in a long running and highly effective, humorous series of advertisements by IDI, an insurance company offering direct insurance services over the phone by dialing 9,000,000.

I

IDI is an insurance company. They applied for Israel Trademark No. 264302 for the word שוקה (Shuka) covering financial transactions, insurance and life insurance in class 36 on 2 April 2014. The mark was allowed on 16 July 2015.

The Association of Insurance Agents in Israel, which is a non-profit organization representing thousands of licensed insurance brokers, opposed the mark on 11 August 2015, alleging that it was misleading and its registration was contrary to Section 11(6) of the Trademark Ordinance 1972. The grounds of the Opposition were that the Applicants gave the impression that they were licensed insurance brokers and this is not the case.

Shoka 2There was a proceeding between the parties in the Tel Aviv District Court (28223-03-12) in which the Opposer requested that the court issue an injunction against the Applicant to stop their advertising which was alleged to be insulting slander and misleading, and created unjust competition. The District Court partially accepted the Opposer’s claims and forbade the Applicant from using the advertising campaign clips and radio advertisements and various other advertisements.

Shoka 4

On appeal to the Supreme Court, this decision was overturned. In Civil Appeal 3322/16 and 4313/16 IDI Insurance ltd vs. The Association of Insurance Agents in Israel, 30 April 2017, the Supreme Court ruled that the advertisements did not create a tort and the appropriate grounds for the complaint was the Libel and Slander Act. However Section 54 of the Act relates to any community that is not a company, and so the civil case was inappropriate. The Court stated this in Section 31 of the ruling:

However, in this instance we are dealing with humorous advertisements wherein insurance brokers are indirectly represented in jest and parody that is so exaggerated that it is clear that the reasonable viewer will consider the claims accordingly. That as may be, one cannot state that, following the advertisements, a reasonable person would consider that the characteristics ascribed to Shuka in the advertisements, hedonistic, archaic, etc) apply to specific insurance brokers, and there isn’t even a hint of this.

The Supreme Court also ruled that the advertisements were not an insulting description, since the viewer would not consider the advertisements as information imparted to him seriously due to the dominant humorous elements of the advertisements (paragraph 64 of the advertisement.

The Association of Insurance Agents in Israel requested reconsideration.

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Abandoned Patent Opposition Converted into Ex-Partes Procedure

April 20, 2018

Israel Patent Application No. 220476 to Mapi Pharma titled “Long Acting Depot System Comprising a Pharmaceutical Acceptable Salt of Glatiramer” was allowed and published for opposition purposes. Teva filed an opposition under Section 34 of the Law.

glatiramer

The application relates to a dosing regime of Glatiramer and salts thereof. The drug is an immunomodulator medication used to treat multiple sclerosis.

The application is a national stage of a PCT filed on 19 August 2010 which claims priority from an American patent application of 4 January 2010.

The patent was examined and published for opposition purposes on 31 March 2016. On 28 June 2016, Teva filed an opposition. After the parties submitted their statements of case, Teva withdrew their opposition for commercial reasons.

Under Section 34 of the Patent Law 1967, the Commissioner has to decide whether the suspended opposition provides a sufficient basis for the patent to be granted.

In their Statement of Case Teva raised various issues regarding the patentability of the claimed invention. Since no evidence was submitted, the Deputy Commissioner concentrated on the allegation that the publication of WO2005/041933 from 12 May 2005 anticipates the invention and negates novelty.

Claim 1 recites:

“A long acting parenteral pharmaceutical composition comprising a therapeutically effective amount of a pharmaceutically acceptable salt of glatiramer, the composition being in a sustained release depot form which releases a therapeutically effective amount of the pharmaceutically acceptable salt of glatiramer over a period of about one week to about 6 months.”

Paragraph 20 of the Statement of Case which from paragraph 58 of their counter statement, it appears the patentee accepts, construes claim 1 as follows:

  1. A long acting pharmaceutical composition
  2. For parenteral dosing
  3. comprising a therapeutically effective amount of a pharmaceutically acceptable salt of glatiramer,
  4. the composition being in a sustained release depot form
  5. which releases a therapeutically effective amount of the pharmaceutically acceptable salt of glatiramer over a period of about one week to about 6 months.

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