Retroactive Extension Granted for Reporting a Lecture Disclosing a Patent Application Prior to Filing

October 10, 2017

Background

retroactivePatentability requires that a patent is novel, inventive and useful at the priority date, which is the effective filing date.

The Novelty requirement is absolute, but there are three exceptions given in Section 6 of the Israel Patent Law 1967:

  1. A publication of the invention without consent of the patentee is not novelty destroying, provided that patentee files an patent application promptly on learning about the publication;
  2. Display at a exhibition is not novelty destroying, provided a patent application is filed within six months;
  3. A scientific lecture is not novelty destroying, , provided the registrar was given advanced warning and a patent application is filed within six months.

Section 164 gives the Registrar (Commissioner) wide discretionary powers to extend missed deadlines.

In this ruling, the Deputy Commissioner considers whether the advanced warning of Section 6(3) can be extended retroactively under the discretionary powers given by Section 164, i.e. if the Applicant can inform the Commissioner of a scientific lecture post facto and pay extension fees, so that the lecture by the inventor is not considered as novelty destroying prior art.

The Case

Japan flagOn 6 March 2012, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd. filed Israel Patent Application Number 218495 as a National Phase Entry of PCT/JP2010/053032 titled “Therapeutic Agent for Chronic Pain” that was itself filed on 26 February 2010. The PCT application claimed priority from JP 2009-211021 filed on 11 September 2009.

On 27 August 2009, i.e. before the priority date, the “Conference Proceedings of the 69th Tohoku District Meeting of the Japanese Society of Psychosomatic Medicine” were published. One of these was titled  “An example of complete response of ariprazole against refractory head and neck pain associated with depression”.

A significant amount of the scientific work that was the basis of the patent application and of the conference paper was disclosed in a lecture on 12 September 2009. The Patentee claims that the PCT application was filed within six months of the abstract, and claims priority from the priority application and so the PCT application benefits from the grace period under Section 30 of the Japanese Patent Law.

On 22 July 2010, prior to entering the national stage in Israel, the Agent for Applicant requested an extension to the deadline of Section 6(3). The Head of the PCT Department refused this, since the notification of the publication was not provided in advance, and he considered that only time limits given in the Law can be extended.

On 15 August 2010, the Applicant responded that they would file a second request on entering the national stage into Israel and would provide written and verbal arguments justifying an exception, and, on 16 May 2011, a further notice refusing the extension was issued by the patent office.

On subsequently entering the National Phase into Israel, and with reference to Section 48D(a) of the Law, the Applicant noted that, prior to entering the national phase into Israel, they had requested an extension to Section 6(3), and appended the decision of 16 May 2011.

During the Examination, the abstract from 27 August 2009 was cited against the claimed invention as being novelty destroying. Consequently, the Applicant requested a hearing to discuss whether the Section 6(3) deadline is extendible and, if so, whether the circumstances in question justify the Commissioner retroactively extending the deadline under section 164.

Discussion

Sections 6 and 164 are reproduced below:

  1. The right of the owner of an invention to be granted a patent shall not be affected by publication said in section 4—

(1) if it is proved that the matter published was obtained from him the owner of the invention or his predecessor in title and was published without his consent, and if the patent application was filed within a reasonable time after the publication became known to the applicant; or

(2)(a) the publication was by the owner of the invention or his predecessor in title in one of the following ways:

(i) display at an industrial or agricultural exhibition in Israel or at a recognized exhibition in one of the Convention States, of which official notice was given to the Registrar before its opening;

(ii) publication of a description of the invention at the time of a said exhibition;

(iii) use of the invention for the purposes of the exhibition and at the place of the exhibition;

(b) the publication was by use of the invention, even without its owners’ consent, at the time of the exhibition, at the place of the exhibition or outside it, on condition that the patent application was submitted within six months after the exhibition opened;

(3) publication was by way of a lecture by the inventor before a scientific society or by publication of the lecture in official transactions of the society, on condition that the Registrar was given notice of the lecture before it was delivered and that the patent application is filed within six months after the aforesaid publication.

Section 6(3) lists three conditions, that if fulfilled, render the prior publication as not damaging to the patentability of the patent. The first condition relates to the nature of the publication and to the reasons for it happening. In this instance, it relates to a lecture by the inventor before a scientific society or the publication of the lecture in the formal society conference proceedings. There is no doubt that the publication in question fulfills these conditions.

The third condition relates to the period from which the publication occurs and the date of filing of the patent. The proceedings were published on 27 August 2009, and the international publication was on the 26 February 2010. The Applicant claims that one should see the date of filing of the PCT Application designating Israel, as being the date as far as Section 6(3) is concerned. The Deputy Commissioner, Ms Jacqueline Bracha considers that the Applicant is correct in this regard.

Section 48(c) of the Law is an exception to Section 15 that states that a PCT Application designating Israel, receives a date as per the PCT Convention:

48C. The provisions of this Law shall apply to applications addressed to Israel, with the changes specified in this Chapter and with the changes specified below:

(1) the provisions of sections 11, 14, 15, 17(a) and 20 shall not apply;

(2) the provisions of section 16 shall apply to an application, in respect of which the applicant met the conditions prescribed in section 48D;

(3) the date of the application shall be determined in accordance with the provisions of the Convention;

(4) the provisions of section 165(a) shall not apply to information published under the Convention in respect of applications;

(5) notwithstanding the provisions of section 168(a), documents published according to the Convention in respect of applications shall be open for public inspection.

In accordance with Section 11(3) of the PCT Conventions, the filing date of the PCT application is considered as the National Entry Date in all designated states:

(3)  Subject to Article 64(4), any international application fulfilling the requirements listed in items (i) to (iii) of paragraph (1) and accorded an international filing date shall have the effect of a regular national application in each designated State as of the international filing date, which date shall be considered to be the actual filing date in each designated State.”

In light of this, the effective filing date in Israel is the filing date of the PCT Application designating Israel, and so the Applicant has fulfilled Section 6(3) of the Law.

The Applicant does not dispute that he did not fulfill the second condition requiring informing the Commissioner of the lecture before it happened. However, he alleges that it is within the Commissioner’s Authority to extend this deadline using the powers granted to him under Section 164 of the Law.

Patent Deadlines are generally extendible, apart from the deadline for filing an opposition, the deadline at which a patent lapses (but can be restored), the grace period for renewals, and deadlines relating to patent term extensions. Other than these, the Registrar (Commissioner) has wide discretion to grant extensions. This is clear from Section 164 of the Law, repeated below:

164.—(a) The Registrar may, if he sees reasonable cause for doing so, extend any time prescribed by this Law or by regulations under it for the performance of anything at the Office or before the Registrar, except for the times prescribed in sections 30, 56, 57, 61, 64F, 64M; however, for purposes of section 10—

(1) the Registrar shall not extend the time prescribed by subsection (a)(1), unless he is satisfied that the application in Israel was not submitted on time because of circumstances over which the applicant and his representative had no control and which could not be prevented;

(2) the Registrar shall extend the time prescribed by subsection (a)(2) only as long as the application has not yet been accepted and if he is satisfied that a mistake was made innocently.

(3)The Registrar may make the extension of times conditional on conditions as he deems fit.

(c) An application for extension of a time may be submitted within the time or after it.

(d)Notwithstanding the provisions of subsections (a) and (b) and the provisions of any other Law, if the last day of the period prescribed in section 10(a)(1) falls on a .day that is not a work day, then the period shall end on the first work day thereafter; this provisions does not derogate from the power to extend beyond the time prescribed in section 10(a)(1).

The Examiner considered that this condition is not a deadline that can be extended and so the Commissioner does not have jurisdiction under Section 164.

The Deputy Commissioner notes that as far as the publication in question is concerned, the Applicant acted in good faith opposite the Patent Office. Firstly, even before entering the national phase the Applicant requested an extension to inform the patent office, when filing, he noted the request on the Application form and listed the reference in the list of disclosed prior art in accordance with the duty of disclosure under Section 18 of the Law. When discussing the requirement in the hearing, the question arose as to whether the Applicant should have appealed Dr Bart’s ruling. Perhaps the Applicant should have Appealed under Section 161 but the Deputy Commissioner does not consider it too late to discuss the issue substantively, nor does she consider the failure to appeal as being inequitable behavior.

The main issue under discussion, is whether the requirement to provide advanced knowledge of a publication is a deadline that can be retroactively extended under section 161, i.e. whether this is an exception to the rule.

To answer this question, it appears appropriate to consider the underlying purpose of the condition and its source. Section 11 of the Paris Convention for the Protection of Intellectual Property 1883 states that the signatory states should provide temporary protection for a period not exceeding that defined in section 4 of the Convention (grace period) for displaying an invention or design at an official exhibition. Indeed, allowing exhibited goods to be protected was one of the aims of the convention:

“(a) Since lack or inadequacy of protection of industrial property at international exhibitions was one of the reasons which promoted the conclusion of the Convention, it is natural that the principle of such protection should already have been included in the original text of the Convention of 1883. It was then the intention to oblige the member States to take necessary legislative measures to that effect but to leave them free in determining the ways and means of achieving this end.”

GHC Bodenhausen Guide to the Application of the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property, as Revised at Stockholm in 1967 (1968) page 149.

Since the individual states had wide discretion regarding their national legislation and the administrative requirements for obtaining this protection, the basis for the pre-exhibition notice, which is largely unique to Israel, is not part of the convention itself. Additionally, examination of the pre legislative proposed law does not provide an explanation.

The Law in many jurisdictions does not require a pre Exhibition notice of intent to exhibit to be submitted to the patent office. The Japanese Patent Office requires sub mission of the patent application together with a notice within six months of the exhibition. (See Hiroya Kawaguchi “The Essentials of Japanese Patent Law” (2007) p. 31.

A similar requirement for submitting a the notice of an exhibition together with the application is found in Section 55 of the European Patent Convention:

“(1) For the application of Article 54, a disclosure of the invention shall not be taken into consideration if it occurred no earlier than six months preceding the filing of the European patent application and if it was due to, or in consequence of:

(a) an evident abuse in relation to the applicant or his legal predecessor, or

(b) the fact that the applicant or his legal predecessor has displayed the invention at an official, or officially recognized, international exhibition falling within the terms of the Convention on international exhibitions signed at Paris on 22 November 1928 and last revised on 30 November 1972.

(2) In the case of paragraph 1(b), paragraph 1 shall apply only if the applicant states, when filing the European patent application, that the invention has been so displayed and files a supporting certificate within the time limit and under the conditions laid down in the Implementing Regulations.”

In the US, the exhibition of the invention is part of the one year general grace period for inventor disclosures – See §35 US Section 102b of the US Patent Law and Daniel J. Gervais International Intellectual Property: A Handbook of Contemporary Research (2015) p.45.

From here it is clear that the Israel Law is somewhat unique in requiring prior notification. In light of the difference between the Laws and the legislative being silent regarding whether or not this period can be extended, the question of the interest that the Israel Law intended to protect by requiring prior notification of exhibition or lecture becomes important.

There are three possible purposes that come to mind.

  1. One possibility is to protect the inventor who, prior to exhibiting or lecturing, must determine that the exhibit or lecture will not damage his future protection. By providing notification, the Commissioner can obtain the disclosure and will be reminded of the Section 6 exception. If the inventor does not receive the authorization to exhibit, he can quickly file an Application before the publication. This paternalistic rationale, even if a positive thing, is somewhat exceptional on the IP horizon.
  2. Another possible purpose is certainty of the public regarding whether a prior disclosure is legally and not merely factually novelty disclosing or not. In other words, the public wishes to know as early as possible, if an invention is to be patent protected or if it is in the public domain. Even if this is an appropriate aim, it is not achieved by the requirement for earlier registration under section 6(3) of the Law, since such notification is not known to the public prior to the patent application becoming available for public inspection 18 months after filing (and until fairly recently, only on allowance). At the time that the patent file wrapper is available for inspection, it makes no difference if the Patent Office was informed of the exhibition or lecture in advance or after the event. Thus the public reliance on publication is different from the reliance on national phase entry which interested parties can and do follow, see for example, 23511-05-12 Mindcake LLC vs. Israel Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, 17 January 2013:

Thus, the extension of the national phase entry deadline is a matter of significance, since when this date passes, the invention is immediately transferred from the patentee to the public domain, who is allowed to make use of the invention according to their will.

In this instance, we cannot assume that this reliance is relevant since the public learn about the exhibition approval long after it has issued, so long as it is before the patent wrapper itself is open for inspection.

3.A third aim might be to provide the Commissioner with the tools to determine whether a prior art publication is indeed at a scientific or recognized exhibition or not. For such an aim, the Deputy Commissioner does not consider that prior notice makes much difference. The onus is on the patentee to convince the Commissioner, who is not required to make investigations. So in cases where the Applicant is unable to convince the Commissioner that the exhibition should not be novelty destroying, his request will be refused. From here it is clear that any evidentiary problems will work against the Applicant and we therefore return to the first suggestion that the purpose is to protect the Applicant.

This is not the first time that the Court of the Patent Office has considered this issue. In re IL 68447 to Byong Wha Suh (published on 29 February 1984), the Commissioner was petitioned to extend the Section 6 time-frame. After considering the European Patent Law, the Commissioner reasoned that one could indeed extend the deadline for informing the ILPO and reasoned as follows:

“We state immediately that in our Opinion, section 164a of the Israel Patent Law is sufficiently broad to allow the Section 6(2)(a)(1) deadline to be extended.
The Section allows deadlines that are stated in the Patent Law or the Regulations to be extended, and the wording is not limited to procedural deadlines (such as the deadlines for filing and responding in contentious proceedings), but also allows extensions of deadlines that can affect the validity of a patent. This can be learned from the wording of Section 164 which specifically excludes extending deadlines for paying renewal fees for lapsed patents. This teaches that the legislative body did not see fit to prohibit other deadlines being extended at the Commissioner’s discretion.

It is true that there is no positive reference to Section 6(3) in Section 164 of the Law. Section 164 does, however, allow the Commissioner to retroactively allow extensions. The Applicant is correct in his claim that “so long as the Commissioner receives notification of the lecture before it is given” relates to time limits, even if not explicitly. It is also clear that this time passes with the lecture and so any time thereafter misses the stated deadline for the action.

To the extent that the advanced deadline is paternalistic, prohibiting extending the time limit will not enable the intent to be achieved. From here, the Deputy Commissioner deduces that the Commissioner (and by transfer of powers, she herself) has the authorization to extend the time limit.

It is true that the Commissioner has wide discretionary powers under Section 164, the extent of which changes with circumstances. Application of Section 164(a) to give a retroactive extension will be depend on the nature of the process, the specific circumstances, and the weighing up of the Applicant’s interest and the public’s interest. See Appeal 2826/04 Recordati Ireland Ltd vs. Commissioner of Patents, 28 October 2004.

Section 164 of the Law, cited above, that allows the Commissioner to extend deadlines, does not extend to all of the dictates of the Patent Law (for details of the things that the Commissioner does not have discretion to extend deadlines, see Friedman page 172-178). In this instance, the Court of First Instance correctly noted that the Commissioner can extend deadlines before or after they pass, as stated in section 164(c), so long as he sees a reasonable justification for so doing, but the issue is not one of legal authority, but rather of the correct use of that authority. In Appeal 248/95 Fabio Perini S.P.A v. Industrie Meccaniche Alberto Consani S.P.A., Judge Winograd considered the correct interpretation of Section 164 of the Law (in the original version prior to the third amendment). The Court supported the liberal interpretation granting extensions for filing Oppositions, stating that Opposer serves the public interest and the integrity of the Register, and not merely his own interest by filing Oppositions, and the range of things that the Commissioner is allowed to extend is wide.

As ruled in the IL 110548 Opposition Shmuel Sadovski vs. Hugla Kimberly Marketing Ltd. (12 August 2010), the relevant considerations for deciding that a justification is reasonable is the extent of the delay and the explanation for it. The extent of the delay can affect not just the perceived behavior of the Applicant and whether it is reasonable, but also whether the public can be considered to have relied on that behavior.

In this instance, the Applicant first approached the committee with explanations that do not seem unreasonable. The difference between the Israel Patent Law and that in Japan and many other countries goes a long way to justify the mistake made. Indeed, the Applicant made a submission via their attorneys, prior to entering the national phase so as to address the issue as early as possible. As to third parties relying on the delay, it does not seem that this can be construed as being in any way connected to them not contacting the Patent Office prior to the lecture, as explained hereinabove.

Nevertheless, this ruling is given ex-partes at the request of the Applicant, without the public being represented, and at this stage third parties do not have standing. Third party standing will only occur if and when the patent is allowed. In light of the above, the Deputy Commissioner rules that the application can continue to examination without the prior publication in the form of the lecture acting as novelty destroying prior art, using discretion under Section 164 (b) of the law which states “The Commissioner is authorized to extend deadlines as he sees fit”.

Conclusion

The request is accepted and the deadline for informing the patent office is retroactively extended on condition that a fee be paid from the time of the publication of the Application having been filed on 27 August 2009, until the national phase entry into Israel on 6 March 2012. It is noted that the submitted notice that informed the patent office of the prior disclosure was rejected by the Examiner, and the Applicant could have appealed that decision within 30 days, so extension fees would anyway be due.

The retroactive extension is granted contingent on any Oppositions submitted after allowance being considered on their merit, with the issue of this extension being considered legitimate grounds for inter-partes challenge.

Ruling by Ms Jacqueline Bracha re Section 6 publication of IL 218495, 24 September 2017


PCT Filing Fees to Drop in January 2016

December 17, 2015

wipo_pct_logo270

Israel applicants of the PCT can select the USPTO, the EPO or the ILPO for conducting International Searches and preliminary examinations, i.e. for generating the ISR and IPER and chapter 2.

As of January 1, 2016, most of the PCT prices will drop. For example, the International filing fee will drop from $1384 to $1363. That price is good for applications of up to 30 pages including forms and Figures. Additional pages currently cost a further $16, but this will drop $1 a page to $15 a page.

The International Search fees via the EPO will drop from the current $2125 to $2097. Preliminary Examination fees (for the IPER) will drop from $208 to $205 if the USPTO is used. The IPER fee via EPO will drop from 191 Euros to a mere 183 Euros.Backing the trend however, the Israel Patent Office (ILPO) will now charge 794 Shekels instead of 766 Shekels.

Users of PCT Safe save $205 per application, and if they file electronically, the discount is $307.

PC Tea

PC Tea

Extraordinary value for money is our PCTea bags which take away the stress of international filing. These are a blend of organic green tea and organic spearmint (nana) and are worth about $10 a box. Clients using our stress free PCT services are welcome to a free box.


So Israel took his journey with all that he had, and came to Beersheba (Genesis 46)

April 14, 2015

park Carusso

Yesterday I enjoyed a pleasant trip down South to attend the WIPO Roving Seminar in Beer Sheva. The drive was pleasant. Negev is very verdant and the ornithology was good, with a lot of storks and black kites and the odd short-toed eagle in evidence. The event started at 9:30, and, with considerably less congestion getting into Beer Sheva than into Tel Aviv, I arrived at 9:15 am at the Carusso Science Park.

Moshe Lemberg, the Senior Program Officer at WIPO who organized the event introduced himself to me and hoped that I would blog about the refreshments. I thought this was a little surprising as the rogelach and burekas were fairly standard fayre but did make a welcome breakfast. Unfortunately however, the 3 litre hot water urn was inadequate to the task and I was unable to make myself a coffee. That had an adverse affect on my concentration during the first part of the program, and I noted that after Dr Daniel Ben Oliel presented the prize for Excelling Academic thesis in various fields of IP [sic] there were three or four competitors who presented brief talks on their papers for the Israel Patent Office Competition, but have no idea what they talked about. The chairs were too comfortable, I’d left home at 7 am and I was too far away from the screen. My neighbor kept nudging me. I suspect I was snoring a little. I went to the bathroom, washed my face and had a coffee (botz, using water from the now refilled urn), and went back in sitting closer to the front. This was a great improvement and I found the sessions interesting, stimulating and enjoyable.

Those wanting a review of the early sessions are respectfully referred to the IPKAT where the Doyen of IP Bloggers, Professor Jeremy Phillips has some insightful and relevant comments. See here.  For inciteful and irrelevant ones, read on!

Professor Phillips notes that there were 98 registrants. He was sitting in the back corner and was better situated to count heads than I was. I do try to keep tally on these events however, and did a head count on three occasions throughout the day. I noted 60 in the audience. With 5 rovers from WIPO and a large contingent from the patent office, this was less than impressive. I hope that the Haifa event on Tuesday is better attended, and as the program is largely the same, can highly recommend it.

PCT

PC Tea

PC Tea

Mr Matthew Bryan, the director of the PCT Legal Division gave a brief review of the PCT system and recent developments, and the amicable and helpful Dr Michael Bart who heads up the Israel Receiving Office spke about recent changes there. The local Beer Sheva (actually Omer – but who’se counting?) Mukhtar Patent Attorney, Dr Kfir Luzzatto joined Matthew and Michael, and gave some thoughts on the PCT, how Israel joining the system had affected the profession, and how he views International Search Reports from the Israel Patent Office.

Trademarks and Designs

Ms Debbie Roenning, Director of the Legal Division Madrid Register, Brands and Designs Section (BDS) spoke on Madrid system for trademark registration and then on the Hague system for Design Registration.  As well as showing which countries had signed up, she showed which countries were in the process of signing up which was useful. She also had some tips regarding tailoring goods for different jurisdictions, translating the list of goods into Hebrew, adding countries to an existing application and varying classes per country that were very informative.

Ms Anat Levi Sofer spoke briefly about trademarks and Madrid from the perspective of the Israel Patent Office and considered Israel joining Madrid a great success. Ms Ronit Bazik Sofer, head of trademarks at Reinhold Cohn represented the private sector and noted that she had been apprehensive of Israel joining Madrid and indeed, there had been a drop off in work since Israel joined, but with increased prosecution, things had evened out.

Knowing the official figures regarding trademarks filed directly into Israel and via Madrid, and Madrid marks originating in Israel, I think that both Ms Anat Levi Sofer and Ms Ronit Bazik Sofer were being less than objective. (Reinhold Cohn has too large a market segment for their practice not to follow the official statistics). Israel is very good at creating technology, but is less successful at launching international brands. Madrid has not been widely used by Israeli companies. It is possible that with additional prosecution resulting from more trademark applications designating Israel, workers in the trademark office and in private practice feel that they are busy. However, without the lucrative filing and with renewals handled centrally or by bucket shops, the revenues generated are lower that revenues once were. This is true of both patent office revenue and income to IP firms.

There was an opportunity to ask questions. In her first slide, Ms Roenning had shown various recent Israel trademarks filed by Israelis. The slide also included WIPO’s logo. It was tempting to ask why they had chosen what look’s like a roll of toilet paper, but I decided that it would unnecessarily cheapen the event.

Wipe-o

WIPE-O !

WIPO’s Arbitration and Mediation Center

Mr Matthew Bryan gave a presentation regarding WIPO’s arbitration and mediation services.  It was certainly worthwhile reminding those present that there are alternative methods of dispute resolution, and that going to court is not the only option.

Databases

Mr. Yoshiyuki Takagi spoke about WIPO’s databases such as WIPO Green and WIPO Re:Search. This brought some useful online tools to the attention of participants.

Lunch

ravioli

We were pleasantly surprised that WIPO / Patent Office had laid on a sumptuous buffet of ravioli, pizza, macaroni, cheese rolls, garlic bread, quiches, cheeses and salads. Had this been a couple of days after Shavuot (Pentacost) this may have seemed more of the same, but after a week of Pesach, noone passed over the opportunity to dine on hametz.

Copyright 

real life

Mr. Paolo Lanteri, the Legal Officer, Copyright Law Division, Culture and Creative Industries Sector, WIPO spoke about the gaming industry. It seems that I was far from the only participant who wasn’t a gamer. I put this down to a combination of the audience being middle aged nerds.

It was fascinating to learn that the gaming industry is more significant financially than feature films and music combined. Happily people still read.

It seems that protecting IP in games is a complicated issue. The talk was very informative.

Questions were solicited and I made a case for moving over to registration of copyright and shorter periods of protection since I consider the system as broken. Jeremy Phillips took issue with my position and argued that most people in practice can do most of what they want and that the system does give redress for abuses. We continued arguing in the car back to Jerusalem.

Closing session

men in suits

The WIPO representatives and the Commissioner got on stage together as a panel. It was reassuring with INTA coming up, to note that my charcoal suit is apparently in fashion for IP events.

Dr Luzzatto took the opportunity to ask about Arab countries boycotting Israel, giving the example of Jordan that, despite a peace agreement, in practice the legal profession there won’t represent Israelis.

Mr Matthew Bryan first dodged the question by noting that Jordan was not a signatory to the PCT. As Kfir would not let things go at that, he rather sensibly pointed out that WIPO strongly condemns Arab countries discriminating against Israel, and writes strongly worded letters noting that such countries are not living up to their international obligations. He did, however, point out WIPO does not have enforcement police and their influence is very limited.

The Commissioner noted that Israel could theoretically refuse to allow applications originating from countries that don’t accept Israeli trademark or patent applications, but that the Israel Patent Office decided not to adopt this policy.

Retired US patent attorney Bruce Lilling noted that Taiwan, an important industrial nation was kicked out of the PCT mechanism at China’s request.

Recommendation

For those who missed the Beer Sheva event yesterday, I recommend trying to attend the largely parallel but slightly shorter program in Haifa tomorrow. See here.

Gratuitous Political Rambling Digression (its my blog so I can do what I like)

I note that Ms Debbie Roenning (who also wore a trouser suit, but not a tie) is the head of the Brands and Designs Section which shares the unfortunate acronym of BDS, the ‘Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions’ Movement, the allegedly pro Palestinian, but actually notoriously hypocritical and anti-Semitic international movement.

On the way to the conference, I noted Sodastream’s new factory in Beer Sheva. They moved from the Industrial Area by Maale Adumim (a satellite town of Jerusalem on the road towards Jericho) in response to vicious propaganda abroad. In the Maale Adumim factory, Sodastream provided jobs to West Bank Arabs and was a model of co-existence. Forced to relocate, the primary sufferers are the West Bank Arabs.
WIPO is one of the least anti-Israel organs of the UN. I think it might have been very worthwhile for them to have invited Jordanian, Palestinian and Egyptian IP professionals, both government and private, to the event. I am on good terms with professional colleagues in all these jurisdictions, and with others in Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and elsewhere, who read this blog, and chat amicably with me at INTA, AIPPI and other international conferences. Peace is made by trade.

Of course, Israel is not the only country to have been boycotted. To advance U.S. foreign policy and national security objectives, the U.S. maintains laws and regulations that impose economic sanctions against certain countries, individuals, and entities (the “U.S. Sanctions Program”).  31 C.F.R. § 501 et seq.  The Office of Foreign Asset Control (“OFAC”) at the Department of the Treasury manages the U.S. Sanctions Program.  The U.S. Sanctions Program prohibits U.S. nationals and U.S. companies from doing business in embargoed or sanctioned countries and from doing business with individuals or entities subject to U.S. sanctions laws and regulations.  At various times, the US has forbidden their nationals to register trademarks in Cuba and has also failed to uphold Cuban trademarks. Whether or not human rights are more mistreated by Castro’s regime in Cuba or by the US in the Guantanamo Bay prison camp is not clear.


PCT Direct

March 31, 2015

DIrect

The Israel Patent Office has announces an experimental service called “PCT Direct”.

PCT Direct is intended to make the process more efficient and to increase the value of the International Search Report (ISR) and International Preliminary Examination Report (IPER) that the Israel Patent Office produces as a Searching and Examining Authority of the PCT (Patent Convention Treaty).

The service is aimed at PCT applications claiming priority from an Israel Application and the system is designed to help respond to the Notice Prior to Examination of the Priority Application

The Applicant will be able to relate to all issues in the Notice Prior to Examination. The response is, however, not part of the PCT request. It seems that the idea is to file a PCT request as a response to a Notice Prior to Examination, submitting a marked up and clean copy, details of other prior art known to examiner and details of first publication.

If the art cited by the Applicant is of value, half the search fees will be refunded.

The PCT response and interaction will be considered as a response to the prosecution of the priority document if not yet allowed.

Apparently the Israel Patent Office is only the second authority, after the EPO, to offer this exciting new service.

 

COMMENT

I am confused as to the point and purpose of this development.

abbreviation

I have an aversion to abbreviations.  PCT, IPER, ISEA, ISR – at least the Talmudists had the excuse that scribes wrote by hand and parchment was expensive. Nevertheless, WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization) uses them, so I suppose we must conform.

The EPO’s description of the PCT Direct service may be found here.

More substantively, The PCT application should be filed within 12 months of priority. Israel Applications publish automatically at 18 months, so one wonders what first publication is being considered here.

I think that this initiative is designed for applications that are made special and examined immediately, either due to them being green applications that are environmentally friendly, or due to applicant petitioning based on age, suspected infringement and the like. It is possible that this has ramifications for a PCT application claiming priority from an earlier PCT application.

It also seems that the applicant need not actively file PCT responses in the parent file but can rely on the system doing so automatically.

Not too long ago, the search report of the PCT was considered as something of little value and was often ignored by examiners who examined to grant patents.  Then came the Patent Prosecution Highway, and then the Superhighway. I think this further development is designed to demonstrate that the Israel Search and Examining Authority, is willing to grant patents based on their PCT work, as is, apparently, the EPO and to create additional trust in the system. Hopefully this will translate into less duplication and a faster, more efficient, high quality service.

This is, however, speculation.

Readers who can briefly summarize what PCT Direct is all are about are cordially invited to do so.


WIPO To Make Two Stops in the Holyland

March 18, 2015

road show

WIPO, the World Intellectual Property Organization that is manages the PCT system for filing International patents and the Madrid Protocol for filing international trademarks has a team of roving lecturers who will be performing lecturing in Israel.

Concerts Seminars are scheduled for 13th April in Beer Sheva and for the 15th April in Haifa.

More details may be found here

The provisional program in Beer Sheva Park Carusso for Science, 79 Atzmaut Street, is as follows:

Monday, April 13, 2015

9.30 a.m. – 9.50 a.m. Opening Session

Welcome addresses by:
Mr. Asa Kling, Director, Israel Patent Office (ILPO)
Local industry\Chief Scientist\Politician TBD
Mr. Yoshiyuki Takagi, Assistant Director General, Global Infrastructure Sector (GIS), WIPO

9.50 a.m. – 10.10 a.m. Topic 1: The ILPO as WIPO’s cooperation partner and service provider for the users of the IP system

Speaker: Mr. Asa Kling, ILPO\

10.10 a.m. – 10.30 a.m. Topic 2: Introduction to WIPO
Development of the International Legal Framework
Major Intellectual Property Economic Studies

Speaker: Mr. Moshe Leimberg, Senior Program Officer, Section for Coordination of Developed countries, Department for Transition and Developed Countries (TDC), WIPO

10.30 a.m. – 10.45 a.m. Topic 3: The Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) –
Introduction and Future Developments

Speaker: Mr. Matthew Bryan, Director, PCT Legal Division, Patents and Technology Sector, (PTS), WIPO

10.45 a.m. – 11.00 a.m. The PCT – The actual practice (questions, experiences, discussion)

Moderator: Mr. Michael Bart, Head, PCT division, ILPO

Speakers: Mr. Matthew Bryan, WIPO

Additional speaker(s) Local practitioner(s) TBD

Questions and Answers

11.00 a.m. – 11.15 a.m. Coffee break

11.15 a.m. – 11.35 a.m. Topic 4: Global Intellectual Property Systems
The Madrid System for the International Registration of Marks
The Hague System for the International Registration of Industrial Designs

Speaker: Mrs. Debbie Roenning, Director, Legal Division, Madrid Registry, Brands and Designs Sector (BDS), WIPO

11.35 a.m. – 11.50 a.m. Global Intellectual Property Systems: The actual practice (questions, experiences, discussion)

Moderator: Ms. Anat Levi-Ne’eman, Head, Trademarks Division, ILPO

Speakers: Ms. Debbie Roenning, WIPO

Additional speaker(s) Local practitioner(s) TBD

Questions and Answers

11.50 a.m. – 12.10 p.m. Topic 5: WIPO’s Arbitration and Mediation Center

Speaker: Mr. Matthew Bryan, WIPO

12.10 p.m. – 12.40 p.m. Topic 6: Global Databases for Intellectual Property Platforms and Tools for the Connected Knowledge Economy, with an emphasis on WIPO Green and WIPO Re:Search

Speaker: Mr. Yoshiyuki Takagi, WIPO

12.40 p.m. – 1.00 p.m. Topic 7: WIPO digital copyright developments

Speaker: Mr. Paolo Lanteri, Legal Officer, Copyright Law Division, Culture and Creative Industries Sector, WIPO

1.00 p.m. – 1.30 p.m. CLOSING SESSION

Questions and Answers

1.30 p.m. – 2.30 p.m. Lunch break with specific Sessions (Patents, Trademarks, Databases, and Copyright)

2.30 p.m. – 3.00 p.m. Ceremony to present the ILPO prize for an academic thesis on various fields of IP

Presenter: Dr. Daniel Ben Oliel, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Haifa University

The Wednesday Program in Haifa will be held on Wednesday, April 15 2015 at the Technion in the Batler Hall, Neeman Centre, Technion:

9.00 a.m. – 9.20 a.m. Opening Session

Welcome addresses by:
Mr. Asa Kling, Director, Israel Patent Office (ILPO)
Local industry\Chief Scientist\Politician TBD
Mr. Yoshiyuki Takagi, Assistant Director General, Global Infrastructure Sector (GIS), WIPO

9.20 a.m. – 9.40 a.m. Topic 1: The ILPO as WIPO’s cooperation partner and service provider for the users of the IP system

Speaker: Mr. Asa Kling, ILPO

9.40 a.m. – 10.00 a.m. Topic 2: Introduction to WIPO
Development of the International Legal Framework
Major Intellectual Property Economic Studies

Speaker: Mr. Moshe Leimberg, Senior Program Officer, Section for Coordination of Developed countries, Department for Transition and Developed Countries (TDC), WIPO

10.00 a.m. – 10.15 a.m. Topic 3: The Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) –
Introduction and Future Developments

Speaker: Mr. Matthew Bryan, Director, PCT Legal Division, Patents and Technology Sector, (PTS), WIPO

10.15 a.m. – 10.35 a.m. The PCT – The actual practice (questions, experiences, discussion)

Moderator: Mr. Michael Bart, Head, PCT division, ILPO

Speakers: Mr. Matthew Bryan, WIPO

Additional speaker(s) Local practitioner(s) TBD

Questions and Answers

10.35 a.m. – 10.50 a.m. Coffee break

10.50 a.m. – 11.10 a.m. Topic 4: Global Intellectual Property Systems
The Madrid System for the International Registration of Marks
The Hague System for the International Registration of Industrial Designs

Speaker: Mrs. Debbie Roenning, Director, Legal Division, Madrid Registry, Brands and Designs Sector (BDS), WIPO

11.10 a.m. – 11.25 a.m. Global Intellectual Property Systems: The actual practice (questions, experiences, discussion)

Moderator: Ms. Anat Levi-Ne’eman, Head, Trademarks Division, ILPO

Speakers: Ms. Debbie Roenning, WIPO

Additional speaker(s) Local practitioner(s) TBD

Questions and Answers

11.25 a.m. – 11.45 a.m. Topic 5: WIPO’s Arbitration and Mediation Center

Speaker: Mr. Matthew Bryan, WIPO

11.45 a.m. – 12.15 p.m. Topic 6: Global Databases for Intellectual Property Platforms and Tools for the Connected Knowledge Economy, with an emphasis on WIPO Green and WIPO Re:Search

Speaker: Mr. Yoshiyuki Takagi, WIPO

12.15 p.m. – 12.35 p.m. Topic 7: WIPO digital copyright developments

Speaker: Mr. Paolo Lanteri, Legal Officer, Copyright Law Division, Culture and Creative Industries Sector, WIPO

12.35 p.m. – 1.00 p.m. CLOSING SESSION

Questions and Answers

1.00 p.m. – 2.00 p.m. Lunch break with specific Sessions (Patents, Trademarks, Databases, and Copyright)

COMMENTS

We suspect that this portends Israel joining the Hague System for the International Registration of Industrial Designs or some other design upheaval.

In general I applaud the idea of not doing every seminar in Tel Aviv or Jerusalem. However, the majority of practitioners to not live in Haifa or Beer Sheva. Why start these events at 9 am? Surely a 10 am kick-off would be more appropriate where people are traveling in?


PCT Filing Fee Reductions in January 2015

December 14, 2014

wipo_pct_logo270savings

The official fees incurred for filing, prosecuting, registering and renewing patents, designs and trademarks in Israel are linked to the cost of living index. Twice a year, on 1 January and on 1 June, they are adjusted. It seems that living in Israel is ever more expensive, and each adjustment makes each fee a few Shekels more.

WIPO works differently. From time to time their fees for PCT related services are adjusted, but not necessarily upwards.

As of 1 January 2015 the basic international filing fee for a PCT application will drip from $1471 to $1384. Excess page fees will drop from $17 a page to $16 a page.

If one elects the EPO as the international Search and Examination Office, the search will cost $2366 instead of the current $2545.

Using PCT Easy saves $104 per application, and filing electronically as XML or similar saves $208. It is possible to combine these and file electronically using PCT Easy, saving $312.

 

 

 

 


LLM in Patent Law at Haifa finally on its way

December 11, 2014

haifa university law school

Back in June 2009, I reported on the ceremonial launch of Haifa University’s Masters in Law program in Patent Law – see here.

Recently fired Minister of Justice, Tzippy Livni, authorized the Commissioner of Patents to rule on whether such programs would provide a dispensation from patent office exams for would-be patent attorneys. In September of this year, I reported about the standards for obtaining dispensation from the theory exam for patent attorneys. See here and here. Essentially, so long as the degree covers all subject matter, such as trademarks, designs, basic foreign requirements, international treaties and procedural issues, the top 20% graduating will be entitled to a dispensation from the theory exam.

The long awaited Master’s Degree in Patent Law at Haifa University is finally on the Patent Prosecution Highway on its way. The first intake is this January. Some candidates have already signed up, but there are apparently places available.

It occurs to me, that someone interested back when the program was launched has had time to do the prerequisite science or engineering degree, and to have then done two years on the job training (hitmachut). No doubt however, there are some additional wannabe patent attorneys out there who think that this degree is the key to fame and fortune.

We wish the faculty and students every success with this endeavour!